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Author (up) Brooks, H.L.; Rushton, K.; Lovell, K.; Bee, P.; Walker, L.; Grant, L.; Rogers, A. doi  openurl
  Title The power of support from companion animals for people living with mental health problems: a systematic review and narrative synthesis of the evidence Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication BMC Psychiatry Abbreviated Journal BMC Psychiatry  
  Volume 18 Issue 1 Pages 31  
  Keywords Comapnion animals; Pets; Cats; Dogs; Canine; Feline; Mental health; Support  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: There is increasing recognition of the therapeutic function pets can play in relation to mental health. However, there has been no systematic review of the evidence related to the comprehensive role of companion animals and how pets might contribute to the work associated with managing a long-term mental health condition. The aim of this study was to explore the extent, nature and quality of the evidence implicating the role and utility of pet ownership for people living with a mental health condition. METHODS: A systematic search for studies exploring the role of companion animals in the management of mental health conditions was undertaken by searching 9 databases and undertaking a scoping review of grey literature from the earliest record until March 2017. To be eligible for inclusion, studies had to be published in English and report on primary data related to the relationship between domestic animal ownership and the management of diagnosable mental health conditions. Synthesis of qualitative and quantitative data was undertaken in parallel using a narrative synthesis informed by an illness work theoretical framework. RESULTS: A total of 17 studies were included in the review. Quantitative evidence relating to the benefits of pet ownership was mixed with included studies demonstrating positive, negative and neutral impacts of pet ownership. Qualitative studies illuminated the intensiveness of connectivity people with companion animals reported, and the multi-faceted ways in which pets contributed to the work associated with managing a mental health condition, particularly in times of crisis. The negative aspects of pet ownership were also highlighted, including the practical and emotional burden of pet ownership and the psychological impact that losing a pet has. CONCLUSION: This review suggests that pets provide benefits to those with mental health conditions. Further research is required to test the nature and extent of this relationship, incorporating outcomes that cover the range of roles and types of support pets confer in relation to mental health and the means by which these can be incorporated into the mainstay of support for people experiencing a mental health problem.  
  Address Psychology of Healthcare Research Group, Department of Psychological Sciences, Institute of Psychology, Health and Society, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. Helen.brooks@liverpool.ac.uk. Mental Health Research Group, Division of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work, Faculty of Biology, Medicine and Health, School of Health Sciences, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK. University of Manchester, Manchester, UK. NIHR CLAHRC Wessex, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2018/02/07  
  ISSN 1471-244X (Electronic) 1471-244X (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes ASSIA, CINAHL Plus, Embase, International Bibliography of the Social Sciences, Medline, PsychInfo, Social Science Full Text, Sociological Abstracts, Web of Science and Grey literature sites (OpenGrey, Index to Theses, Electronic Theses Online Services, The Health and Social Care Information Centre Website and the Association of Health Observatories Website) searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1680 Serial 2935  
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Author (up) Charalambous, M.; Pakozdy, A.; Bhatti, S.F.M.; Volk, H.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Systematic review of antiepileptic drugs' safety and effectiveness in feline epilepsy Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication BMC Veterinary Research Abbreviated Journal BMC Vet Res  
  Volume 14 Issue 1 Pages 64  
  Keywords cats; feline; epilepsy; adverse effects; treatment  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Understanding the efficacy and safety profile of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in feline epilepsy is a crucial consideration for managing this important brain disease. However, there is a lack of information about the treatment of feline epilepsy and therefore a systematic review was constructed to assess current evidence for the AEDs' efficacy and tolerability in cats. The methods and materials of our former systematic reviews in canine epilepsy were mostly mirrored for the current systematic review in cats. Databases of PubMed, CAB Direct and Google scholar were searched to detect peer-reviewed studies reporting efficacy and/or adverse effects of AEDs in cats. The studies were assessed with regards to their quality of evidence, i.e. study design, study population, diagnostic criteria and overall risk of bias and the outcome measures reported, i.e. prevalence and 95% confidence interval of the successful and affected population in each study and in total. RESULTS: Forty studies describing clinical outcomes of AEDs' efficacy and safety were included. Only two studies were classified as “blinded randomised controlled trials”. The majority of the studies offered high overall risk of bias and described low feline populations with unclear diagnostic criteria and short treatment or follow-up periods. Individual AED assessments of efficacy and safety profile showed that phenobarbital might currently be considered as the first choice AED followed by levetiracetam and imepitoin. Only imepitoin's safety profile was supported by strong level of evidence. Imepitoin's efficacy as well as remaining AEDs' efficacy and safety profile were supported by weak level of evidence. CONCLUSIONS: This systematic review reflects an evidence-based assessment of the published data on the AEDs' efficacy and safety for feline epilepsy. Currently, phenobarbital is likely to be the first-line for feline epileptic patients followed by levetiracetam and imepitoin. It is essential that clinicians evaluate both AEDs' effectiveness and tolerability before tailoring AED to the individual patient. Further studies in feline epilepsy treatment are by far crucial in order to establish definite guidelines for AEDs' efficacy and safety.  
  Address Small Animal Department, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ghent University, Merelbeke, Belgium. marios.charalambous@ugent.be. Clinical Unit of Internal Medicine Small Animals, University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna, Austria. Small Animal Department, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ghent University, Merelbeke, Belgium. Department of Clinical Science and Services, Royal Veterinary College, Hawkshead Lane, Brookmans Park, UK.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2018/03/04  
  ISSN 1746-6148 (Electronic) 1746-6148 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, CAB Direct and Google scholar searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1670 Serial 2925  
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Author (up) Chatziprodromidou, I.P.; Arvanitidou, M.; Guitian, J.; Apostolou, T.; Vantarakis, G.; Vantarakis, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Global avian influenza outbreaks 2010-2016: a systematic review of their distribution, avian species and virus subtype Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Abbreviated Journal Syst Rev  
  Volume 7 Issue 1 Pages 17  
  Keywords Avian flu; Chickens; Poulty; Outbreak; Wild birds  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: We conducted a systematic review to investigate avian influenza outbreaks and to explore their distribution, upon avian influenza subtype, country, avian species and other relating details as no comprehensive epidemiological analysis of global avian influenza outbreaks from 2010 to 2016 exists. METHODS: Data was collated from four databases (Scopus, Web of Science Core Correlation, PubMed and SpringerLink electronic journal) and a global electronic reporting system (ProMED mail), using PRISMA and ORION systematic approaches. One hundred seventy three avian influenza virus outbreaks were identified and included in this review, alongside 198 ProMED mail reports. RESULTS: Our research identified that the majority of the reported outbreaks occurred in 2016 (22.2%). These outbreaks were located in China (13.6%) and referred to commercial poultry farms (56.1%). The most common subtype reported in these outbreaks was H5N1 (38.2%), while almost 82.5% of the subtypes were highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses. There were differences noticed between ProMED mail and the scientific literature screened. CONCLUSIONS: Avian influenza virus has been proved to be able to contaminate all types of avian species, including commercial poultry farms, wild birds, backyard domestic animals, live poultry, game birds and mixed poultry. The study focused on wet markets, slaughterhouses, wild habitats, zoos and natural parks, in both developed and developing countries. The impact of avian influenza virus seems disproportionate and could potentially burden the already existing disparities in the public health domain. Therefore, a collaboration between all the involved health sectors is considered to be more than necessary.  
  Address Department of Public Health, School of Medicine, University of Patras, Patras, Greece. ioannachatzi@med.upatras.gr. Department of Hygiene and Epidemiology, School of Medicine, University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece. Royal Veterinary College, London, UK. Department of Physiotherapy, School of Health Professionals, Alexander Technological Educational Institute of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece. Prefecture of Western Greece, Patras, Greece. Department of Public Health, School of Medicine, University of Patras, Patras, Greece.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2018/01/26  
  ISSN 2046-4053 (Electronic) 2046-4053 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Scopus, Web of Science Core Correlation, PubMed, SpringerLink electronic journal and a global electronic reporting system (ProMED mail) searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1468 Serial 2923  
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Author (up) Chidumayo, N.N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Epidemiology of canine gastrointestinal helminths in sub-Saharan Africa Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Parasites and Vectors Abbreviated Journal Parasit Vectors  
  Volume 11 Issue 1 Pages 100  
  Keywords Dogs; Canines; Canine; Prevalence; Zoonosis; Parasites; Africa  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Dogs have a close association with humans providing companionship, security and a source of dietary protein. However, dogs are also potential carriers of zoonotic pathogens. Dogs, therefore, pose a public health risk and a good understanding of canine diseases is important for planning and implementing control measures. The aim of this study was to characterise canine helminthiasis in sub-Saharan Africa using a systematic approach. METHODS: Pubmed and Google Scholar were searched for relevant primary studies published from 2000. Forty-one eligible studies were included in the meta-analysis. Pooled prevalences were estimated using the quality effects model. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Twenty-six genera of enteric helminths were reported and the pooled estimate of canine helminthiasis was 71% (95% CI: 63-79%). Species of Ancylostoma and Toxocara, causative agents of larva migrans in humans, were the most frequently reported helminths with pooled estimated prevalences of 41% (95% CI: 32-50%) and 22% (95% CI: 16-29%), respectively. Dipylidium caninum and Taenia spp. were the most frequently reported cestodes with pooled estimated prevalences of 20% (95% CI: 12-29%) and 9% (95% CI: 5-15%), respectively. Trematodes were rarely reported. There was a high level of heterogeneity in most pooled estimates (I(2) > 80%). The results of this study show that canine helminthiasis is highly prevalent in sub-Saharan Africa and there is need for regular deworming programmes to improve the health status of the dogs and minimise the potential health risk to humans.  
  Address Clinical Studies Department, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Zambia, P. O. Box 32379, Lusaka, Zambia. nozyechic@yahoo.com.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2018/02/21  
  ISSN 1756-3305 (Electronic) 1756-3305 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Pubmed and Google Scholar searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1675 Serial 2930  
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Author (up) Cox, K.; Brennan, L.P.; Gerwing, T.G.; Dudas, S.E.; Juanes, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Sound the alarm: A meta-analysis on the effect of aquatic noise on fish behavior and physiology Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Global Change Biology Abbreviated Journal Glob Chang Biol  
  Volume Epublication ahead of print Issue Pages  
  Keywords Fish; Behaviour; Physiology; Global change; Noise pollution  
  Abstract The aquatic environment is increasingly bombarded by a wide variety of noise pollutants whose range and intensity are increasing with each passing decade. Yet, little is known about how aquatic noise affects marine communities. To determine the implications that changes to the soundscape may have on fishes, a meta-analysis was conducted focusing on the ramifications of noise on fish behavior and physiology. Our meta-analysis identified 42 studies that produced 2,354 data points, which in turn indicated that anthropogenic noise negatively affects fish behavior and physiology. The most predominate responses occurred within foraging ability, predation risk, and reproductive success. Additionally, anthropogenic noise was shown to increase the hearing thresholds and cortisol levels of numerous species while tones, biological, and environmental noise were most likely to affect complex movements and swimming abilities. These findings suggest that the majority of fish species are sensitive to changes in the aquatic soundscape, and depending on the noise source, species responses may have extreme and negative fitness consequences. As such, this global synthesis should serve as a warning of the potentially dire consequences facing marine ecosystems if alterations to aquatic soundscapes continue on their current trajectory.  
  Address Department of Biology, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada. Hakai Institute, Calvert Island, BC, Canada. Department of Biology, Vancouver Island University, Nanaimo, BC, Canada. Ecosystem Science and Management Program, University of Northern British Columbia, Prince George, BC, Canada.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2018/02/25  
  ISSN 1365-2486 (Electronic) 1354-1013 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Web of Science, ScienceDirect and JSTOR searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1674 Serial 2929  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Ducrotoy, M.J.; Munoz, P.M.; Conde-Alvarez, R.; Blasco, J.M.; Moriyon, I. doi  openurl
  Title A systematic review of current immunological tests for the diagnosis of cattle brucellosis Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Preventative Veterinary Medicine Abbreviated Journal Prev Vet Med  
  Volume 151 Issue Pages 57-72  
  Keywords Brucellosis; Cattle; Diagnosis; Vaccination; Immunology  
  Abstract Brucellosis is a worldwide extended zoonosis with a heavy economic and public health impact. Cattle, sheep and goats are infected by smooth Brucella abortus and Brucella melitensis, and represent a common source of the human disease. Brucellosis diagnosis in these animals is largely based on detection of a specific immunoresponse. We review here the immunological tests used for the diagnosis of cattle brucellosis. First, we discuss how the diagnostic sensitivity (DSe) and specificity (DSp), balance should be adjusted for brucellosis diagnosis, and the difficulties that brucellosis tests specifically present for the estimation of DSe/DSp in frequentistic (gold standard) and Bayesian analyses. Then, we present a systematic review (PubMed, GoogleScholar and CABdirect) of works (154 out of 991; years 1960-August 2017) identified (by title and Abstract content) as DSe and DSp studies of smooth lipopolysaccharide, O-polysaccharide-core, native hapten and protein diagnostic tests. We summarize data of gold standard studies (n=23) complying with strict inclusion and exclusion criteria with regards to test methodology and definition of the animals studied (infected and S19 or RB51 vaccinated cattle, and Brucella-free cattle affected or not by false positive serological reactions). We also discuss some studies (smooth lipopolysaccharide tests, protein antibody and delayed type hypersensitivity [skin] tests) that do not meet the criteria and yet fill some of the gaps in information. We review Bayesian studies (n=5) and report that in most cases priors and assumptions on conditional dependence/independence are not coherent with the variable serological picture of the disease in different epidemiological scenarios and the bases (antigen, isotype and immunoglobulin properties involved) of brucellosis tests, practical experience and the results of gold standard studies. We conclude that very useful lipopolysaccharide (buffered plate antigen and indirect ELISA) and native hapten polysaccharide and soluble protein tests exist, provided they are applied taking into account the means available and the epidemiological contexts of this disease: i) mass vaccination; ii) elimination based on vaccination combined with test-and-slaughter; and iii) surveillance and existence of false positive serological reactions. We also conclude that the insistence in recent literature on the lack of usefulness of all smooth lipopolysaccharide or native hapten polysaccharide tests in areas where S19 vaccination is implemented is a misinterpretation that overlooks scientific and practical evidence.  
  Address Division of Infection and Pathway Medicine, School of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine & Veterinary Medicine The University of Edinburgh, Chancellor's Building, 49 Little France Crescent, Edinburgh, EH16 4SB, UK. Electronic address: marie.ducrotoy@gmail.com. Unidad de Tecnologia en Produccion y Sanidad Animal, IA2 CITA/Universidad de Zaragoza, Avenida de Montanana 930, 50059, Zaragoza, Spain. Electronic address: pmmunnoz@cita-aragon.es. Instituto de Salud Tropical (ISTUN), Instituto de Investigacion Sanitaria de Navarra (IdISNA) y Depto. Microbiologia y Parasitologia, Universidad de Navarra, Edificio de Investigacion, c/Irunlarrea 1, 31008, Pamplona, Spain. Electronic address: rconde@unav.es. Unidad de Tecnologia en Produccion y Sanidad Animal, IA2 CITA/Universidad de Zaragoza, Avenida de Montanana 930, 50059, Zaragoza, Spain. Electronic address: jblasco@unizar.es. Instituto de Salud Tropical (ISTUN), Instituto de Investigacion Sanitaria de Navarra (IdISNA) y Depto. Microbiologia y Parasitologia, Universidad de Navarra, Edificio de Investigacion, c/Irunlarrea 1, 31008, Pamplona, Spain. Electronic address: imoriyon@unav.es.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2018/03/03  
  ISSN 1873-1716 (Electronic) 0167-5877 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, GoogleScholar and CABdirect searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1671 Serial 2926  
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Author (up) Dutton-Regester, K.J.; Barnes, T.S.; Wright, J.D.; Alawneh, J.I.; Rabiee, A.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A systematic review of tests for the detection and diagnosis of foot lesions causing lameness in dairy cows Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Preventive Veterinary Medicine Abbreviated Journal Prev Vet Med  
  Volume 149 Issue Pages 53-66  
  Keywords Dairy cows; Lameness; DCows; Cattle; Bovines  
  Abstract Foot lesions causing lameness in dairy cows are important economic and welfare issues. Prompt and correct detection and diagnosis are critical for improving economic and welfare outcomes. Few tests are currently available to aid the dairy farmer in the detection and diagnosis of foot lesions. The objectives of this systematic review were to identify those tests that have been investigated for the detection and diagnosis of foot lesions causing lameness in dairy cows, evaluate the methodological quality of the studies investigating the identified tests, compare the accuracy of the identified test, and determine which tests can be recommended for implementation on the farm based on accuracy and practicality for use by dairy farmers. A comprehensive literature search resulted in 2137 papers. After removing duplicates and performing relevance screening, 12 papers with 20 studies met the inclusion criteria. Pertinent data from each study were extracted using a standardised form. Eligible studies were grouped based on the objective of the test under investigation, resulting in the following groups of disorders: lameness, foot lesions, sole ulcer, and digital dermatitis. Methodological quality was assessed using the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (QUADAS-2) tool which includes four domains: animal selection, index test, reference test and flow and timing. Incomplete reporting in the studies limited the assessment of methodological quality. The animal selection domain was particularly poorly reported. No single study could be classified as being at low risk of bias across all domains of the QUADAS-2 tool. One automated test was identified, while all others were manually operated. No studies reported the cost of the test in question and only two studies reported the time taken to carry out the procedures involved with using the test in question. It was not possible to compare the accuracy of these tests or recommend which tests are suitable for implementation on the farm. This was due to incomplete reporting of information and significant risk of bias in all studies.  
  Address The University of Queensland, School of Veterinary Science, Gatton, Queensland, 4343, Australia. Electronic address: katejanedr@gmail.com. The University of Queensland, School of Veterinary Science, Gatton, Queensland, 4343, Australia; The University of Queensland, Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation, Gatton, Queensland, 4343, Australia. Electronic address: t.barnes@uq.edu.au. The University of Queensland, School of Veterinary Science, Gatton, Queensland, 4343, Australia. Electronic address: j.wright2@uq.edu.au. The University of Queensland, School of Veterinary Science, Gatton, Queensland, 4343, Australia. CSA Analytics, Horsley, NSW, 2530, Australia. Electronic address: ahmadr@csaanalytics.com.au.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Enlgish Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2018/01/02  
  ISSN 1873-1716 (Electronic) 0167-5877 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, using medical subject headings (MeSH) (1951-February 2015); Web of Science, Core Collection, advanced search (1990-February 2015); and Agricola, advanced search in both the Article Citation Database and National Agricultural Library (NAL) catalogue (1970-February 2015) searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1685 Serial 2938  
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Author (up) Glennon, E.E.; Restif, O.; Sbarbaro, S.R.; Garnier, R.; Cunningham, A.A.; Suu-Ire, R.D.; Osei-Amponsah, R.; Wood, J.L.N.; Peel, A.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Domesticated animals as hosts of henipaviruses and filoviruses: A systematic review Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication The Veterinary Journal Abbreviated Journal Vet J  
  Volume 233 Issue Pages 25-34  
  Keywords Bats; Humans; Dogs; Bat-borne viruses; Zoonsis; Filoviruses Henipaviruses  
  Abstract Bat-borne viruses carry undeniable risks to the health of human beings and animals, and there is growing recognition of the need for a 'One Health' approach to understand their frequently complex spill-over routes. While domesticated animals can play central roles in major spill-over events of zoonotic bat-borne viruses, for example during the pig-amplified Malaysian Nipah virus outbreak of 1998-1999, the extent of their potential to act as bridging or amplifying species for these viruses has not been characterised systematically. This review aims to compile current knowledge on the role of domesticated animals as hosts of two types of bat-borne viruses, henipaviruses and filoviruses. A systematic literature search of these virus-host interactions in domesticated animals identified 72 relevant studies, which were categorised by year, location, design and type of evidence generated. The review then focusses on Africa as a case study, comparing research efforts in domesticated animals and bats with the distributions of documented human cases. Major gaps remain in our knowledge of the potential ability of domesticated animals to contract or spread these zoonoses. Closing these gaps will be necessary to fully evaluate and mitigate spill-over risks of these viruses, especially with global agricultural intensification.  
  Address Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK. Electronic address: eeg31@cam.ac.uk. Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK. Institute of Zoology, Zoological Society of London, Regent's Park, London, UK. Accra National Zoo, Accra, Ghana. Department of Animal Science, University of Ghana, Accra, Ghana. Environmental Futures Research Institute, Griffith University, Nathan, Australia.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2018/03/01  
  ISSN 1532-2971 (Electronic) 1090-0233 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Web of Knowledge searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1672 Serial 2927  
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Author (up) Legatti, S.A.M.; El Dib, R.; Legatti, E.; Botan, A.G.; Camargo, S.E.A.; Agarwal, A.; Barretti, P.; Paes, A.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acute kidney injury in cats and dogs: A proportional meta-analysis of case series studies Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication PLoS One Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 13 Issue 1 Pages e0190772  
  Keywords Acute Kidney Injury; Cats; Dogs; AKI; mortality  
  Abstract INTRODUCTION: Risk of mortality in the setting of acute kidney injury (AKI) in cats and dogs remains unclear. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the incidence of mortality in cats and dogs with AKI based on etiology (i.e. infectious versus non-infectious; receiving dialysis versus conservative treatment). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ovid Medline, EMBASE, and LILACS were searched up to July 2016. Articles were deemed eligible if they were case series studies evaluating the incidence of all-cause mortality in cats and dogs with AKI, regardless of etiology or the nature of treatment. RESULTS: Eighteen case series involving 1,201animalsproved eligible. The pooled proportions for overall mortality were: cats53.1% [95% CI 0.475, 0.586; I2 = 11,9%, p = 0.3352]; dogs 45.0% [95% CI 0.33, 0.58; I2 = 91.5%, P < 0.0001]. A non-significant increase in overall mortality risk was found among dialysed animals relative to those managed with conservative treatment, independent of animal type and the etiology of their AKI. The pooled proportions for overall mortality according to etiology, regardless of treatment type, were: AKI due infectious etiology for cats and dogs, 19.2% [95% CI 0.134, 0.258; I2 = 37.7%, P = 0.0982]; AKI due non-infectious etiology for cats and dogs, 59.9% [95% CI 0.532, 0.663; I2 = 51.0%, P = 0.0211]. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest higher rates of overall mortality in cats and dogs with AKI due to non-infectious etiologies relative to infectious etiologies, and showed non-significant differences in terms of higher rates associated with dialysis compared to conservative management. Further investigations regarding optimal time to initiate dialysis and the development of clinical models to prognosticate the course of disease and guide optimal treatment initiation for less severe cases of AKI in cats and dogs is warranted.  
  Address Department of Veterinary Hygiene and Public Health, School of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, Unesp – Univ Estadual Paulista, Botucatu, Sao Paulo, Brazil. Department of Anaesthesiology, Botucatu Medical School, Unesp – Univ Estadual Paulista, Botucatu, Sao Paulo, Brazil. McMaster Institute of Urology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. School of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, Unesp – Univ Estadual Paulista, Botucatu, Sao Paulo, Brazil. Institute of Science and Technology, Department of Biosciences and Oral Diagnosis, Unesp – Univ Estadual Paulista, Sao Jose dos Campos, Sao Paulo, Brazil. Schoolof Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. Department of Internal Medicine, Botucatu Medical School, Unesp – Univ Estadual Paulista, Botucatu, Sao Paulo, Brazil.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2018/01/26  
  ISSN 1932-6203 (Electronic) 1932-6203 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Ovid Medline, EMBASE, and LILACS searched Approved no  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1467 Serial 2922  
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Author (up) Losada-Espinosa, N.; Villarroel, M.; Maria, G.A.; Miranda-de la Lama, G.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Pre-slaughter cattle welfare indicators for use in commercial abattoirs with voluntary monitoring systems: A systematic review Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Meat Science Abbreviated Journal Meat Sci  
  Volume 138 Issue Pages 34-48  
  Keywords Abattoir Cattle; Meat quality; Pre-slaughter stress; Voluntary monitoring systems  
  Abstract Animal welfare has become an important subject of public, economic and political concern, leading to the need to validate indicators that are feasible to use at abattoirs. A systematic review was carried out, which identified 72 cattle welfare indicators (CWI) that were classified into four categories (physiological, morphometric, behavioral and meat quality). Their validity and feasibility for use in abattoirs were evaluated as potential measures of cattle welfare during transportation to the abattoir and at the abattoir itself. Several highly valid indicators were identified that are useful to assess welfare at abattoirs, including body condition score, human-animal interactions, vocalizations, falling, carcass bruising, and meat pH. In addition, some intermediate valid indicators are useful and should be investigated further. Information along the food chain could be used systematically to provide a basis for a more-risk-based meat inspection. An integrated system based on the use of key indicators defined for each inspection step with the setting of alarm thresholds could be implemented.  
  Address Graduate Program in Sciences of Animal Health and Production, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, National Autonomous University of Mexico, UNAM, Mexico. Department of Animal Science, E.T.S.I.A. Polytechnic University of Madrid, Madrid, Spain. Department of Animal Production & Food Science, AgriFood Institute of Aragon (IA2), University of Zaragoza, Zaragoza, Spain. Department of Food Science, Metropolitan Autonomous University, UAM, Lerma, State of Mexico, Mexico. Electronic address: g.miranda@correo.ler.uam.mx.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2018/01/02  
  ISSN 1873-4138 (Electronic) 0309-1740 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, ScienceDirect, Scopus and Scielo searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1469 Serial 2924  
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Author (up) Pratt, N.; Rajeev, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Leptospira seroprevalence in animals in the Caribbean region: A systematic review Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Acta Tropica Abbreviated Journal Acta Trop  
  Volume 182 Issue Pages 34-42  
  Keywords Dogs; Canines; Rodents; Amphibians; Cattle; Bovines; Sheep; Ovines; Goats; Caprines; Humans; Caribbean; Leptospirosis; Seroprevalence  
  Abstract This systematic review summarises the data published on the Leptospira seroprevalence, serovar diversity and distribution among animal species in the Caribbean region. Following Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) guidelines, and checklist, relevant articles were identified and data were extracted and recorded. The review provided Leptospira seroprevalence data from 16 Caribbean islands (Barbados, Trinidad, Grenada, Puerto Rico, Saint Croix, St. Kitts and Nevis, Jamaica, Antigua, Carriacou, Dominica, Guadalupe, Martinique, Monserrat, St. Lucia, St. Maarten, and St. Vincent) in a variety of animal species. Reviewing the literature highlighted the limited amount of data available from limited number of islands. Many of the studies conducted have recorded seroprevalences based on variable and small samples sizes. Besides, serovar panels used for MAT were not consistent between studies. The review indicates that the Leptospira exposure in a given geographic location may change with time and climatic and environmental conditions, and highlights the need to conduct continual surveillance in tropical countries where the climate supports the survival of Leptospira in the environment. Specific attention must be given to standardization of MAT panels and protocols and providing training across laboratories involved in testing. Further, animal and environment testing to isolate and identify circulating Leptospira spp. in a geographic region must actively be pursued. This knowledge is important to implement geographically specific control programs, as risk factors of Leptospira transmission is favoured by various factors such as change in climatic conditions, urbanization, encroachment of wildlife inhabitation, import/export of animals, increase in adventure travel, and water related recreational activities.  
  Address Department of Biomedical Sciences, Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine, PO Box 334, Basseterre, Saint. Kitts, West Indies. Electronic address: njpratt@hotmail.co.uk. Department of Biomedical Sciences, Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine, PO Box 334, Basseterre, Saint. Kitts, West Indies. Electronic address: srajeev@rossvet.edu.kn.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2018/02/20  
  ISSN 1873-6254 (Electronic) 0001-706X (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes EBSCOhost, Wiley-Blackwell, Springer Link, Science Direct, Wiley Online and PubMed Central searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1676 Serial 2931  
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Author (up) Sarvi, S.; Daryani, A.; Sharif, M.; Rahimi, M.T.; Kohansal, M.H.; Mirshafiee, S.; Siyadatpanah, A.; Hosseini, S.A.; Gholami, S. url  openurl
  Title Zoonotic intestinal parasites of carnivores: A systematic review in Iran Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Veterinary World Abbreviated Journal Vet World  
  Volume 11 Issue 1 Pages 58-65  
  Keywords Dogs; Foxes; Jackals; Cats; Canines; Felines; Endoparasites; Zoonosis  
  Abstract Aim: Parasitic infections, especially of the zoonotic-parasitic type, are the most important health, economic, and social problems in developing countries, including Iran. The aim of this study was to review systematically the available data on gastrointestinal parasites of carnivores in Iran and their ability to infect humans. Materials and Methods: Studies reporting intestinal parasites of carnivores were systematically collected from nine electronic English and Persian databases and Proceedings of Iranian parasitology and veterinary congresses published between 1997 and 2015. A total of 26 studies issued from 1997 to 2015 met the eligibility criteria. Results: The pooled proportion of intestinal parasites of carnivores was estimated as 80.4% (95% confidence interval=70.2-88.8%). The overall prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites in dogs, cats, foxes, and jackals were 57.89%, 90.62%, 89.17%, and 97.32%, respectively. Dipylidium caninum (20.45%), Toxocara spp. (18.81%), Taenia hydatigena (15.28%), Mesocestoides lineatus (11.83%), Echinococcus granulosus (10%), and Toxascaris leonina (8.69%) were the most frequently observed parasites. Conclusion: High prevalence rates of zoonotic intestinal parasites of carnivores particularly Echinococcus spp. and Toxocara spp. increase the risk of acquiring zoonotic infections such as cystic hydatid, alveolar cysts, and visceral or ocular larva migrants in Iranian people. Therefore, it is essential for public health centers to develop more effective control strategies to decrease infections rates in carnivores' populations.  
  Address Department of Parasitology and Mycology, Toxoplasmosis Research Center, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari, Iran. Department of Parasitology, School of Medicine, Shahroud University of Medical Sciences, Shahroud, Iran. Department of Parasitology and Mycology, School of Medicine, Zanjan University of Medical Sciences, Zanjan, Iran. Department of Husbandry, Qaemshahr branch of Islamic Azad University, Mazandaran, Iran. Department of Parasitology and Mycology, School of Medicine, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari, Iran.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2018/02/27  
  ISSN 0972-8988 (Print) 0972-8988 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, Scopus, Science Direct, Web of Science (ISI), Google Scholar, Magiran, Scientific Information Database, Iran Medex, and Iran Doc searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1673 Serial 2928  
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Author (up) Totton, S.C.; Cullen, J.N.; Sargeant, J.M.; O'Connor, A.M. doi  openurl
  Title The reporting characteristics of bovine respiratory disease clinical intervention trials published prior to and following publication of the REFLECT statement Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Preventative Veterinary Medicine Abbreviated Journal Prev Vet Med  
  Volume 150 Issue Pages 117-125  
  Keywords Bovine respiratory disease; Cattle; Cows; Bovines; Randomised Controlled Trials; REFLECT Controlled trial Standards  
  Abstract The goal of the REFLECT Statement (Reporting guidElines For randomized controLled trials in livEstoCk and food safeTy) (published in 2010) was to provide the veterinary research community with reporting guidelines tailored for randomized controlled trials for livestock and food safety. Our objective was to determine the prevalence of REFLECT Statement reporting of items 1-19 in controlled trials published in journals between 1970 and 2017 examining the comparative efficacy of FDA-registered antimicrobials against naturally acquired BRD (bovine respiratory disease) in weaned beef calves in Canada or the USA, and to compare the prevalence of reporting before and after 2010, when REFLECT was published. We divided REFLECT Statement, items 3, 5, 10, and 11 into subitems, because each dealt with multiple elements requiring separate assessment. As a result, 28 different items or subitems were evaluated independently. We searched MEDLINE((R)) and CABI (CAB Abstracts((R)) and Global Health((R))) (Web of Science) in April 2017 and screened 2327 references. Two reviewers independently assessed the reporting of each item and subitem. Ninety-five references were eligible for the study. The reporting of the REFLECT items showed a point estimate for the prevalence ratio >1 (i.e. a higher proportion of studies published post-2010 reported this item compared to studies published pre-2010), apart from items 10.3, i.e., item 10, subitem 3 (who assigned study units to the interventions), 13 (the flow of study units through the study), 16 (number of study units in analysis), 18 (multiplicity), and 19 (adverse effects). Fifty-three (79%) of 67 studies published before 2010 and all 28 (100%) papers published after 2010 reported using a random allocation method in either the title, abstract, or methods (Prevalence ratio=1.25; 95% CI (1.09,1.43)). However, 8 studies published prior to 2010 and 7 studies published post-2010 reported the term “systematic randomization” or variations of this term (which is not true randomization) to describe the allocation procedure. Fifty-five percent (37/67) of studies published pre-2010 reported blinding status (blinded/not blinded) of outcome assessors, compared to 24/28 (86%) of studies published post-2010 (Prevalence ratio=1.5, 95% CI (1.19, 2.02)). The reporting of recommended items in journal articles in this body of work is generally improving; however, there is also evidence of confusion about what constitutes a random allocation procedure, and this suggests an educational need. As this study is observational, this precludes concluding that the publication of the REFLECT Statement was the cause of this trend.  
  Address 63 College Avenue West, Guelph, Ontario, N1G 1S1, Canada. Electronic address: sarah.totton@gmail.com. Department of Veterinary Diagnostic and Production Animal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, 50011-3619, USA. Department of Population Medicine, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, 50 Stone Road East, Guelph, Ontario, N1G 2W1, Canada; Centre for Public Health and Zoonoses, University of Guelph, 50 Stone Road East, Guelph, Ontario, N1G 2W1, Canada; Arrell Food Institute, University of Guelph ,50 Stone Road East, Guelph, Ontario, N1G 2W1, Canada.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2018/02/07  
  ISSN 1873-1716 (Electronic) 0167-5877 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes MEDLINE and CABI searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1679 Serial 2934  
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Author (up) Wolf, J.C.; Wheeler, J.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A critical review of histopathological findings associated with endocrine and non-endocrine hepatic toxicity in fish models Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Aquatic Toxicology Abbreviated Journal Aquat Toxicol  
  Volume 197 Issue Pages 60-78  
  Keywords Fish; Toxicoloy; Endocrine; Liver  
  Abstract Although frequently examined as a target organ for non-endocrine toxicity, histopathological evaluation of the liver is becoming a routine component of endocrine disruption studies that utilize various fish species as test subjects. However, the interpretation of microscopic liver findings can be challenging, especially when attempting to distinguish adverse changes associated with endocrine disrupting substances from those caused by systemic or direct hepatic toxicity. The purpose of this project was to conduct a critical assessment of the available peer-reviewed and grey literature concerning the histopathologic effects of reproductive endocrine active substances (EAS) and non-endocrine acting substances in the livers of fish models, and to determine if liver histopathology can be used to reliably distinguish endocrine from non-endocrine etiologies. The results of this review suggest that few compound-specific histopathologic liver effects have been identified, among which are estrogen agonist-induced increases in hepatocyte basophilia and proteinaceous intravascular fluid in adult male teleosts, and potentially, decreased hepatocyte basophilia in female fish exposed to substances that possess androgenic, anti-estrogenic, or aromatase inhibitory activity. This review also used published standardized methodology to assess the credibility of the histopathology data in each of the 117 articles that reported liver effects of treatment, and consequently it was determined that in only 37% of those papers were the data considered either highly credible or credible. The outcome of this work highlights the value of histopathologic liver evaluation as an investigative tool for EAS studies, and provides information that may have implications for EAS hazard assessment.  
  Address Experimental Pathology Laboratories, Inc., 45600 Terminal Drive, Sterling, VA, 20166, USA. Electronic address: jwolf@epl-inc.com. Dow AgroSciences, 3 B Park Square, Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxfordshire, OK14 4RN, UK. Electronic address: jrwheeler@dow.com.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2018/02/16  
  ISSN 1879-1514 (Electronic) 0166-445X (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed database and Google Scholar searched Approved no  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1677 Serial 2932  
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Author (up) Yakimicki, M.L.; Edwards, N.E.; Richards, E.; Beck, A.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Animal-Assisted Intervention and Dementia: A Systematic Review Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Clinical Nursing Research Abbreviated Journal Clin Nurs Res  
  Volume Issue Pages 1054773818756987  
  Keywords Animal-assisted therapy; Dogs; Canines; Dementia  
  Abstract This review discusses the relationship between animal-assisted interventions (AAI) and behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD). A systematic search was conducted within CINAHL, Web of Science CAB Abstracts, PubMed, Abstracts in Social Gerontology, Google Scholar, and PsycINFO for primary research articles. A total of 32 studies were included in the final review. Variation was noted in study designs and in study setting. Twenty-seven of 32 studies used dogs as the intervention. Agitation/aggression showed a significant decrease in nine of 15 studies. Eleven of 12 studies demonstrated increased social interaction with AAI. Mood had mixed results in nine studies. Quality of life was increased in three of four studies. Resident activity and nutritional intake were each increased in two studies. Animal assisted activities/interventions showed a strong positive effect on social behaviors, physical activity, and dietary intake in dementia patients and a positive effect on agitation/aggression and quality of life.  
  Address 1 Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, USA.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2018/02/15  
  ISSN 1552-3799 (Electronic) 1054-7738 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes CINAHL, Web of Science CAB Abstracts, PubMed, Abstracts in Social Gerontology, Google Scholar, and PsycINFO searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1678 Serial 2933  
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