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Author (up) Abdi, R.D.; Agga, G.E.; Aregawi, W.G.; Bekana, M.; Van Leeuwen, T.; Delespaux, V.; Duchateau, L. doi  openurl
  Title A systematic review and meta-analysis of trypanosome prevalence in tsetse flies Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication BMC Veterinary Research Abbreviated Journal BMC Vet Res  
  Volume 13 Issue 1 Pages 100  
  Keywords Trypanosoma; Tsetse Flies  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: The optimisation of trypanosomosis control programs warrants a good knowledge of the main vector of animal and human trypanosomes in sub-Saharan Africa, the tsetse fly. An important aspect of the tsetse fly population is its trypanosome infection prevalence, as it determines the intensity of the transmission of the parasite by the vector. We therefore conducted a systematic review of published studies documenting trypanosome infection prevalence from field surveys or from laboratory experiments under controlled conditions. Publications were screened in the Web of Science, PubMed and Google Scholar databases. Using the four-stage (identification, screening, eligibility and inclusion) process in the PRISMA statement the initial screened total of 605 studies were reduced to 72 studies. The microscopic examination of dissected flies (dissection method) remains the most used method to detect trypanosomes and thus constituted the main focus of this analysis. Meta-regression was performed to identify factors responsible for high trypanosome prevalence in the vectors and a random effects meta-analysis was used to report the sensitivity of molecular and serological tests using the dissection method as gold standard. RESULTS: The overall pooled prevalence was 10.3% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 8.1%, 12.4%) and 31.0% (95% CI = 20.0%, 42.0%) for the field survey and laboratory experiment data respectively. The country and the year of publication were found to be significantly factors associated with the prevalence of trypanosome infection in tsetse flies. The alternative diagnostic tools applied to dissection positive samples were characterised by low sensitivity, and no information on the specificity was available at all. CONCLUSION: Both temporal and spatial variation in trypanosome infection prevalence of field collected tsetse flies exists, but further investigation on real risk factors is needed how this variation can be explained. Improving the sensitivity and determining the specificity of these alternative diagnostic tools should be a priority and will allow to estimate the prevalence of trypanosome infection in tsetse flies in high-throughput.  
  Address Department of Clinical studies, College of Veterinary Medicine and Agriculture, Addis Ababa University, Bishoftu, Oromia, Ethiopia. retaduguma@gmail.com. Department of Animal Science, Institute of Agriculture, University of Tennessee, 2506 River Drive, Knoxville, USA. retaduguma@gmail.com. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Food Animal Environmental Systems Research Unit, Bowling Green, Kentucky, USA. Werer Agricultural Research Center, Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research, Afar, Ethiopia. Department of Clinical studies, College of Veterinary Medicine and Agriculture, Addis Ababa University, Bishoftu, Oromia, Ethiopia. Department of Crop Protection, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Gent University, Ghent, Belgium. Faculty of Sciences and Bioengineering Sciences, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium. Department of Comparative Physiology and Biometrics, Faculty of Veterinary Sciences, Gent University, Ghent, Belgium.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2017/04/14  
  ISSN 1746-6148 (Electronic) 1746-6148 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Web of Science, PubMed and Google Schola Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1446 Serial 2903  
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Author (up) Abell, K.M.; Theurer, M.E.; Larson, R.L.; White, B.J.; Apley, M. doi  openurl
  Title A mixed treatment comparison meta-analysis of metaphylaxis treatments for bovine respiratory disease in beef cattle Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Animal Science Abbreviated Journal J Anim Sci  
  Volume 95 Issue 2 Pages 626-635  
  Keywords Cattle: Cows; Calves; Bovine; Respiratory diseases; Antimicrobials  
  Abstract The objective of this project was to evaluate the effects of antimicrobials approved for parenteral metaphylactic use in feeder and stocker calves on morbidity and mortality for bovine respiratory disease with the use of a mixed treatment comparison meta-analysis. An initial literature review was conducted in April 2016 through Pubmed, Agricola, and CAB (Commonwealth Agricultural Bureau) for randomized controlled trials for metaphylaxis antimicrobial administered parentally to incoming feedlot or stocker calves within 48 h of arrival. The final list of publications included 29 studies, with a total of 37 trials. There were 8 different metaphylactic antimicrobials. Final event outcomes were categorized into bovine respiratory disease (BRD) morbidity cumulative incidence d 1 to </= 60 of the feeding period, BRD morbidity cumulative incidence d 1 to closeout of the feeding period, BRD mortality cumulative incidence d 1 to closeout of the feeding period, and BRD retreatment cumulative incidence morbidity d 1 to closeout of the feeding period. Network meta-analysis combined direct and indirect evidence for all the event outcomes to determine mean odds ratio (OR) with 95% credibility intervals (CrIs) for all metaphylactic antimicrobial comparisons. The “upper tier” treatment arms for morbidity d 1 to </= 60 included tulathromycin, gamithromycin, and tilmicosin. For BRD mortality cumulative incidence d 1 to closeout and BRD retreatment morbidity d 1 to closeout, classifying the treatment arms into tiers was not possible due to overlapping 95% CrIs. The results of this project accurately identified differences between metaphylactic antimicrobials, and metaphylactic antimicrobial options appear to offer different outcomes on BRD morbidity and mortality odds in feedlot cattle.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2017/04/06  
  ISSN 1525-3163 (Electronic) 0021-8812 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Pubmed, Agricola, and CAB searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1448 Serial 2904  
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Author (up) Afanador-Villamizar, A.; Gomez-Romero, C.; Diaz, A.; Ruiz-Saenz, J. doi  openurl
  Title Avian influenza in Latin America: A systematic review of serological and molecular studies from 2000-2015 Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 12 Issue 6 Pages e0179573  
  Keywords Birds: Avian; Avian influenza; Virus; Poultry  
  Abstract Avian influenza or bird flu is a highly contagious acute viral disease that can occur in epidemics and cross-border forms in poultry and wild birds. The characteristics of avian influenza viruses (AIVs) allow the emergence of new viral variants, some with zoonotic and pandemic potential. AIVs have been identified in Latin America; however, there is a lack of understanding of these viruses at the regional level. We performed a systematic literature review on serological or molecular evidence of AIVs circulation in Latin America. Methods were designed based on the PRISMA and STROME guidelines. Only peer-reviewed studies published between 2000 to 2015 and data was analysed based on country, viral subtype, avian species, and phylogenetic origins. From 271 studies initially found only twenty-six met our inclusion criteria. Evidence of AIVs infection was found in most Latin American countries, with Mexico as the country with the largest number of conducted studies and reported cases during the period analysed, followed by Chile and Argentina. Most of the AIVs were early reported through surveillance systems and at least 14 different subtypes of influenza viruses were reported in birds, and the presence of both low (92.9%) and high (7.1%) pathogenic AIVs was shown in Latin America. Of the reported AIVs in Latin America, 43.7% belong to migratory birds, 28.1% to local wild birds, and 28.1% to poultry. The migratory bird population mainly comprises families belonging to the orders Anseriformes and Charadriformes. We highlight the importance of epidemiological surveillance systems and the possible role of different migratory birds in the transmission of AIVs within the Americas. Our findings demonstrate the limited information on AIVs in Latin America and highlight the need of more studies on AIVs at the regional level, particularly those focused on identifying the endemic subtypes in regional wild birds.  
  Address Semillero de Investigacion en enfermedades Infecciosas – InfeKto, Universidad Cooperativa de Colombia, Bucaramanga, Colombia. PIC – Pig Improvement Company LATAM, Queretaro, Mexico. Grupo de Investigacion en Ciencias Animales GRICA, Universidad Cooperativa de Colombia, Bucaramanga, Colombia.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2017/06/21  
  ISSN 1932-6203 (Electronic) 1932-6203 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes MedLine/PubMed and SciELO-Scientific Electronic Library Online searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1432 Serial 2887  
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Author (up) Ariza, J.M.; Relun, A.; Bareille, N.; Oberle, K.; Guatteo, R. doi  openurl
  Title Effectiveness of collective treatments in the prevention and treatment of bovine digital dermatitis lesions: A systematic review Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Dairy Science Abbreviated Journal J Dairy Sci  
  Volume Epublication ahead of print Issue Pages  
  Keywords Cows; Cattle; Bovine digital dermatitis; Dairy Cow; Collective Treatment  
  Abstract The collective treatment (CT) of an affected herd is commonly advised to control bovine digital dermatitis (DD). Several CT are commercialized, frequently without major evidence supporting their effectiveness. The objective of this systematic review was to evaluate the published evidence that supports CT in the treatment and prevention of DD lesions in dairy herds. Across the evidence, the main limitations in the studies design were identified and the possible sources of inconsistency were investigated. An extensive literature search of publications through electronic databases and gray literature was conducted between July 2015 and January 2016. Studies that did not include an untreated or placebo control group were excluded from the review. The literature search and screening process identified 13 publications with 24 treatment trial comparisons and 18 prevention trial comparisons. The published evidence included studies mostly considered to have a low or unclear risk of bias. Descriptive analyses were performed according to the prevention and treatment outcomes, and case and success definitions were identified for each study and summarized in odds ratios (OR). Pairwise meta-analyses were conducted according to the prevention and treatment outcomes, comparing directly the intervention used in each study, and ignoring any other differences in the intervention characteristics. The results of the meta-analyses indicated a low degree of heterogeneity across the evidence for the prevention outcome [I2 = 0%, 95% CI: 0 to 37.2%, 95% prediction interval (PI): 0.72 to 1.74)] and a moderate degree for the treatment outcome (I2 = 25.3%, 95% CI: 0 to 63%, 95% PI: 0.39 to 3.73). Similarly, appraisal of the graphical L'Abbe plot suggested a considerable degree of heterogeneity across the evidence for the treatment outcome. For both outcomes, the frequent small sample sizes of the trials indicate imprecision across the included studies. Additionally, for the treatment and prevention outcomes, an asymmetric funnel plot suggested possible publication bias. The overall quality of the evidence, for both outcomes (prevention and treatment), was therefore considered to be low, indicating that the true effect of CT may be substantially different from that estimated across the included studies. Consequently, this review and meta-analysis does not support an association between the CT considered in the review and a beneficial effect in the prevention and treatment of DD lesions. The effectiveness of CT therefore remains uncertain, and the epidemiological circumstances in which it can be useful must be investigated. These findings highlight the importance of developing high quality, controlled trials to evaluate the effectiveness of CT for DD control.  
  Address BIOEPAR, INRA, Oniris, La Chantrerie, 44307 Nantes, France; Qalian, Neovia, Segre 49500, France. Electronic address: juan-manuel.ariza@oniris-nantes.fr. BIOEPAR, INRA, Oniris, La Chantrerie, 44307 Nantes, France. Qalian, Neovia, Segre 49500, France.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2017/07/03  
  ISSN 1525-3198 (Electronic) 0022-0302 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, CAB, and Web of Science searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1429 Serial 2888  
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Author (up) Asmare, K.; Abayneh, T.; Sibhat, B.; Shiferaw, D.; Szonyi, B.; Krontveit, R.I.; Skjerve, E.; Wieland, B. doi  openurl
  Title Major vectors and vector-borne diseases in small ruminants in Ethiopia: A systematic review Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Acta Tropica Abbreviated Journal Acta Trop  
  Volume 170 Issue Pages 95-104  
  Keywords Epidemiology; Babesiosis; Ethiopia; Insect Vectors; Ruminants; Theileriasis; Ticks; Trypanosomiasis; Goats; Sheep; Vector  
  Abstract Vector-borne diseases are among major health constraints of small ruminant in Ethiopia. While various studies on single vector-borne diseases or presence of vectors have been conducted, no summarized evidence is available on the occurrence of these diseases and the related vectors. This systematic literature review provides a comprehensive summary on major vectors and vector-borne diseases in small ruminants in Ethiopia. Search for published and unpublished literature was conducted between 8th of January and 25th of June 2015. The search was both manual and electronic. The databases used in electronic search were PubMed, Web of Science, CAB Direct and AJOL. For most of the vector-borne diseases, the summary was limited to narrative synthesis due to lack of sufficient data. Meta-analysis was computed for trypanosomosis and dermatophilosis while meta-regression and sensitivity analysis was done only for trypanososmosis due to lack of sufficient reports on dermatophilosis. Owing emphasis to their vector role, ticks and flies were summarized narratively at genera/species level. In line with inclusion criteria, out of 106 initially identified research reports 43 peer-reviewed articles passed the quality assessment. Data on 7 vector-borne diseases were extracted at species and region level from each source. Accordingly, the pooled prevalence estimate of trypanosomosis was 3.7% with 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.8, 4.9), while that of dermatophilosis was 3.1% (95% CI: 1.6, 6.0). The in-between study variance noted for trypanosomosis was statistically significant (p<0.05). Among the three covariates considered for meta-regression, only one (species) fitted the final model significantly (p<0.05) and explained 65.44% of the between studies variance (R2). The prevalence in sheep (5.5%) increased nearly by 34% compared to goats (2.9%). The parasitic presence in blood was documented for babesiosis (3.7% in goats); and anaplasmosis (3.9% in sheep). Serological evidence was retrieved for bluetongue ranging from 34.1% to 46.67% in sheep, and coxiellosis was 10.4% in goats. There was also molecular evidence on the presence of theileriosis in sheep (93%, n=160) and goats (1.9%, n=265). Regarding vectors of veterinary importance, 14 species of ticks in five genera, four species of Glossina and 4 genera of biting flies were reported. Despite the evidence on presence of various vectors including ticks, flies, mosquitoes and midges, studies on vector-borne diseases in Ethiopia are surprisingly rare, especially considering risks related to climate change, which is likely to affect distribution of vectors. Thus better evidence on the current situation is urgently needed in order to prevent spread and to model future distribution scenarios.  
  Address School of Veterinary Medicine, Hawassa University, P.O. Box 005, Hawassa, Ethiopia. Electronic address: kassahun7588@gmail.com. College of Veterinary Medicine and Agriculture, Addis Ababa University, P.O. Box 34, Debre-Zeit, Ethiopia. College of Veterinary Medicine, Haramaya University, P.O. Box 138, Dire Dawa, Ethiopia. School of Veterinary Medicine, Hawassa University, P.O. Box 005, Hawassa, Ethiopia. International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), P.O. Box 5689, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Norwegian Medicines Agency, P. O. Box 6167 Etterstad, N-0602, Oslo, Norway. University of Life Sciences, Department of Food Safety and Infection Biology, Oslo, Norway.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2017/02/19  
  ISSN 1873-6254 (Electronic) 0001-706X (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, Web of Science, CAB Direct and AJOL searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1460 Serial 2916  
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Author (up) Baudon, E.; Peyre, M.; Peiris, M.; Cowling, B.J. doi  openurl
  Title Epidemiological features of influenza circulation in swine populations: A systematic review and meta-analysis Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication PLoS One Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 12 Issue 6 Pages e0179044  
  Keywords Swine; Pigs; Influenza; Virus; Swine flu  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: The emergence of the 2009 influenza pandemic virus with a swine origin stressed the importance of improving influenza surveillance in swine populations. The objectives of this systematic review and meta-analysis were to describe epidemiological features of swine influenza (SI) across the world and identify factors impacting swine influenza virus surveillance. METHODS: The systematic review followed the PRISMA guidelines. Articles published after 1990 containing data on SI on pig and herd-level seroprevalence, isolation and detection rates, and risk factors were included. Meta-regression analyses using seroprevalence and virological rates were performed. RESULTS: A total of 217 articles were included. Low avian influenza (AI) seroprevalence (means pig = 4.1%; herd = 15%) was found, showing that AIV do not readily establish themselves in swine while SIV seroprevalence was usually high across continents (influenza A means pig = 32.6-87.8%; herd = 29.3-100%). Higher pig density and number of pigs per farm were shown by the meta-regression analyses and/or the risk factor articles to be associated with higher SI seroprevalence. Lower seroprevalence levels were observed for countries with low-to-medium GDP. These results suggest that larger industrial farms could be more at risk of SIV circulation. Sampling swine with influenza-like illness (ILI) was positively associated with higher isolation rates; most studies in Europe, Latin and North America were targeting swine with ILI. CONCLUSIONS: To improve understanding of SI epidemiology, standardization of the design and reporting of SI epidemiological studies is desirable. Performance of SI surveillance systems in low-to-medium GDP countries should be evaluated to rule out technical issues linked to lower observed SIV prevalence. Targeting certain swine age groups, farming systems and swine with ILI may improve the surveillance cost-effectiveness. However, focusing on pigs with ILI may bias virus detection against strains less virulent for swine but which may be important as pandemic threats.  
  Address WHO Collaborating Centre for Infectious Disease Epidemiology and Control, School of Public Health, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China. Animal and Integrated Risk Management Research Unit (AGIRs), French Agricultural Research Center for International Development (CIRAD), Montpellier, France.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2017/06/08  
  ISSN 1932-6203 (Electronic) 1932-6203 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, Web of Science, Science Direct, and Scopus searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1434 Serial 2889  
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Author (up) Brelsford, V.L.; Meints, K.; Gee, N.R.; Pfeffer, K. doi  openurl
  Title Animal-Assisted Interventions in the Classroom-A Systematic Review Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication International Journal of Environmental Reseasrch and Public Health Abbreviated Journal Int J Environ Res Public Health  
  Volume 14 Issue 7 Pages  
  Keywords AAT; Animal-assisted intervention; Animal-assisted Therapy; Children; Classroom; Dogs; School  
  Abstract The inclusion of animals in educational practice is becoming increasingly popular, but it is unclear how solid the evidence for this type of intervention is. The aim of this systematic review is to scrutinise the empirical research literature relating to animal-assisted interventions conducted in educational settings. The review included 25 papers; 21 from peer-reviewed journals and 4 obtained using grey literature databases. Most studies reported significant benefits of animal-assisted interventions in the school setting. Despite this, studies vary greatly in methods and design, in intervention types, measures, and sample sizes, and in the length of time exposed to an animal. Furthermore, a worrying lack of reference to risk assessment and animal welfare must be highlighted. Taken together, the results of this review show promising findings and emerging evidence suggestive of potential benefits related to animals in school settings. The review also indicates the need for a larger and more robust evidence base driven by thorough and strict protocols. The review further emphasises the need for safeguarding for all involved-welfare and safety are paramount.  
  Address School of Psychology, University of Lincoln, Brayford Pool, Lincoln, Lincolnshire LN6 7TS, UK. vbrelsford@lincoln.ac.uk. School of Psychology, University of Lincoln, Brayford Pool, Lincoln, Lincolnshire LN6 7TS, UK. kmeints@lincoln.ac.uk. Department of Psychology, State University of New York, Fredonia, NY 14063, USA. nancy.gee@fredonia.edu. WALTHAM Centre for Pet Nutrition, Waltham-on-the-Wolds, Melton Mowbray, Leicstershire LE14 4RT, UK. nancy.gee@fredonia.edu. School of Psychology, University of Lincoln, Brayford Pool, Lincoln, Lincolnshire LN6 7TS, UK. KPeffer@lincoln.ac.uk.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2017/06/24  
  ISSN 1660-4601 (Electronic) 1660-4601 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Academic Search Complete, Child Development & Adolescent Studies, Frontiers in Science, Medline, PyschArticles, PsychInfo, Science Direct, Scopus, Taylor & Francis online, and Web of Science (including Web of Knowledge) searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1431 Serial 2890  
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Author (up) Bui, C.; Rahman, B.; Heywood, A.E.; MacIntyre, C.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A Meta-Analysis of the Prevalence of Influenza A H5N1 and H7N9 Infection in Birds Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Transboundary and Emerging Diseases Abbreviated Journal Transbound Emerg Dis  
  Volume 64 Issue 3 Pages 967-977  
  Keywords Birds; Avian; Influenza A Virus; Prevalence  
  Abstract Despite a much higher rate of human influenza A (H7N9) infection compared to influenza A (H5N1), and the assumption that birds are the source of human infection, detection rates of H7N9 in birds are lower than those of H5N1. This raises a question about the role of birds in the spread and transmission of H7N9 to humans. We conducted a meta-analysis of overall prevalence of H5N1 and H7N9 in different bird populations (domestic poultry, wild birds) and different environments (live bird markets, commercial poultry farms, wild habitats). The electronic database, Scopus, was searched for published papers, and Google was searched for country surveillance reports. A random effect meta-analysis model was used to produce pooled estimates of the prevalence of H5N1 and H7N9 for various subcategories. A random effects logistic regression model was used to compare prevalence rates between H5N1 and H7N9. Both viruses have low prevalence across all bird populations. Significant differences in prevalence rates were observed in domestic birds, farm settings, for pathogen and antibody testing, and during routine surveillance. Random effects logistic regression analyses show that among domestic birds, the prevalence of H5N1 is 47.48 (95% CI: 17.15-133.13, P < 0.001) times higher than H7N9. In routine surveillance (where surveillance was not conducted in response to human infections or bird outbreaks), the prevalence of H5N1 is still higher than H7N9 with an OR of 43.02 (95% CI: 16.60-111.53, P < 0.001). H7N9 in humans has occurred at a rate approximately four times higher than H5N1, and for both infections, birds are postulated to be the source. Much lower rates of H7N9 in birds compared to H5N1 raise doubts about birds as the sole source of high rates of human H7N9 infection. Other sources of transmission of H7N9 need to be considered and explored.  
  Address School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2016/01/12  
  ISSN 1865-1682 (Electronic) 1865-1674 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, Medline and Embase searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1462 Serial 2918  
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Author (up) Clark, B.; Frewer, L.J.; Panzone, L.A.; Stewart, G.B. doi  openurl
  Title The Need for Formal Evidence Synthesis in Food Policy: A Case Study of Willingness-to-Pay Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Animals (Basel) Abbreviated Journal Animals (Basel)  
  Volume 7 Issue 3 Pages  
  Keywords Cows; cattle; Bovine; Sheep; Ovine; Farm animal welfare; Willingness to pay  
  Abstract Meta-analysis is increasingly utilised in the understanding of consumer behaviour, including in relation to farm animal welfare. However, the issue of publication bias has received little attention. As willingness-to-pay (WTP) is widely used in policy, it is important to explore publication bias. This research aimed to evaluate publication bias in WTP, specifically public WTP for farm animal welfare. A systematic review of four databases yielded 54 studies for random effects meta-analysis. Publication bias was assessed by the Egger test, rank test, contour-enhanced funnel plots, and the Vevea and Hedges weight-function model. Results consistently indicated the presence of publication bias, highlighting an overestimation of WTP for farm animal welfare. Stakeholders should be wary of WTP estimates that have not been critically evaluated for publication bias.  
  Address School of Agriculture Food and Rural Development, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU, UK. b.clark@newcastle.ac.uk. School of Agriculture Food and Rural Development, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU, UK. lynn.frewer@newcastle.ac.uk. School of Agriculture Food and Rural Development, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU, UK. luca.panzone@newcastle.ac.uk. School of Agriculture Food and Rural Development, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU, UK. gavin.stewart@newcastle.ac.uk.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2017/03/14  
  ISSN 2076-2615 (Print) 2076-2615 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Scopus, ISI Web of Knowledge, AgEcon Search, and Google Scholar,. Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1451 Serial 2907  
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Author (up) de Vasconcelos, T.C.B.; Furtado, M.C.; Belo, V.S.; Morgado, F.N.; Figueiredo, F.B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Canine susceptibility to visceral leishmaniasis: A systematic review upon genetic aspects, considering breed factors and immunological concepts Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Infection Genetics and Evolution Abbreviated Journal Infect Genet Evol  
  Volume Epublication ahead of print Issue Pages  
  Keywords Dog; Visceral leishmaniasis; Genetics  
  Abstract Dogs have different susceptibility degrees to leishmaniasis; however, genetic research on this theme is scarce, manly on visceral form. The aims of this systematic review were to describe and discuss the existing scientific findings on genetic susceptibility to canine leishmaniasis, as well as to show the gaps of the existing knowledge. Twelve articles were selected, including breed immunological studies, genome wide associations or other gene polymorphism or gene sequencing studies, and transcription approaches. As main results of literature, there was a suggestion of genetic clinical resistance background for Ibizan Hound dogs, and alleles associated with protection or susceptibility to visceral leishmaniasis in Boxer dogs. Genetic markers can explain phenotypic variance in both pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and in cellular immune responses, including antigen presentation. Many gene segments are involved in canine visceral leishmaniasis phenotype, with Natural Resistance Associated Macrophage Protein 1 (NRAMP1) as the most studied. This was related to both protection and susceptibility. In comparison with murine and human genetic approaches, lack of knowledge in dogs is notorious, with many possibilities for new studies, revealing a wide field to be assessed on canine leishmaniasis susceptibility research.  
  Address Centro de Controle de Zoonoses, Vigilancia em Saude, Secretaria Municipal de Saude, Prefeitura Municipal de Resende, Rua Euridices Paulina de Almeida, 300, Vicentina II, Resende, RJ 27500-000, Brazil. Electronic address: tassia.vasconcelos@gmail.com. Fiocruz Mata Atlantica, Fundacao Oswaldo Cruz, Estrada Rodrigues Caldas, 3400, Taquara, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 22713-375, Brazil. Universidade Federal de Sao Joao del-Rei, campus Centro Oeste Dona Lindu, Rua Sebastiao Goncalves Coelho, 400, Chanadour, Divinopolis, MG 35.501-296, Brazil. Laboratorio de Pesquisa em Leishmaniose, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, Fundacao Oswaldo Cruz, Av. Brasil, 4365, Manguinhos, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 21040-360, Brazil. Laboratorio de Biologia Celular, Instituto Carlos Chagas, Rua Professor Algacyr Munhoz Mader, 3.775, CIC, campus do Tecpar, bloco C, Curitiba, PR 81.350-010 Brazil.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2017/10/11  
  ISSN 1567-7257 (Electronic) 1567-1348 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed and Google Scholar searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1455 Serial 2911  
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Author (up) Dettenmaier, S.J.; Messmer, T.A.; Hovick, T.J.; Dahlgren, D.K. doi  openurl
  Title Effects of livestock grazing on rangeland biodiversity: A meta-analysis of grouse populations Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Ecology and Evolution Abbreviated Journal Ecol Evol  
  Volume 7 Issue 19 Pages 7620-7627  
  Keywords Grouse; Livestock grazing; Biodiversity  
  Abstract Livestock grazing affects over 60% of the world's agricultural lands and can influence rangeland ecosystem services and the quantity and quality of wildlife habitat, resulting in changes in biodiversity. Concomitantly, livestock grazing has the potential to be detrimental to some wildlife species while benefiting other rangeland organisms. Many imperiled grouse species require rangeland landscapes that exhibit diverse vegetation structure and composition to complete their life cycle. However, because of declining populations and reduced distributions, grouse are increasingly becoming a worldwide conservation concern. Grouse, as a suite of upland gamebirds, are often considered an umbrella species for other wildlife and thus used as indicators of rangeland health. With a projected increase in demand for livestock products, better information will be required to mitigate the anthropogenic effects of livestock grazing on rangeland biodiversity. To address this need, we completed a data-driven and systematic review of the peer-reviewed literature to determine the current knowledge of the effects of livestock grazing on grouse populations (i.e., chick production and population indices) worldwide. Our meta-analysis revealed an overall negative effect of livestock grazing on grouse populations. Perhaps more importantly, we identified an information void regarding the effects of livestock grazing on the majority of grouse species. Additionally, the reported indirect effects of livestock grazing on grouse species were inconclusive and more reflective of differences in the experimental design of the available studies. Future studies designed to evaluate the direct and indirect effects of livestock grazing on wildlife should document (i) livestock type, (ii) timing and frequency of grazing, (iii) duration, and (iv) stocking rate. Much of this information was lacking in the available published studies we reviewed, but is essential when making comparisons between different livestock grazing management practices and their potential impacts on rangeland biodiversity.  
  Address Department of Wildland ResourcesJack H. Berryman InstituteUtah State UniversityLoganUTUSA. Ecology CenterUtah State UniversityLoganUTUSA. Range Science ProgramSchool of Natural Resource SciencesNorth Dakota State UniversityFargoNDUSA.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2017/10/19  
  ISSN 2045-7758 (Print) 2045-7758 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes ISI Web of Science and Scopus searched Approved no  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1454 Serial 2910  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Dorea, J.R.R.; Danes, M.A.C.; Zanton, G.I.; Armentano, L.E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Urinary purine derivatives as a tool to estimate dry matter intake in cattle: A meta-analysis Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Dairy Science Abbreviated Journal J Dairy Sci  
  Volume 100 Issue 11 Pages 8977-8994  
  Keywords Cattle; Beef; Dairy; DMI; Nutirition  
  Abstract The objectives of this study were to investigate the relationship between dry matter intake (DMI) and urinary purine derivative (PD) excretion, to develop equations to predict DMI and to determine the endogenous excretion of PD for beef and dairy cattle using a meta-analytical approach. To develop the models, 62 published studies for both dairy (45 studies) and beef cattle (17 studies) were compiled. Twenty models were tested using DMI (kg/d) and digestible DMI (dDMI, kg/d) as response variables and PD:creatinine (linear term: PD:C, and quadratic term: PD:C2), allantoin:creatinine (linear term: ALLA:C, and quadratic term: ALLA:C2), metabolic body weight (BW0.75, kg), milk yield (MY, kg/d), and their combination as explanatory variables for dairy and beef (except for MY) cattle. The models developed to predict DMI for dairy cattle were validated using an independent data set from 2 research trials carried out at the University of Wisconsin (trial 1: n = 45; trial 2: n = 50). A second set of models was developed to estimate the endogenous PD excretion. In all evaluated models, the effect of PD (either as PD:C or ALLA:C) was significant, supporting our hypothesis that PD are in fact correlated with DMI. Despite the BW-independent relationship between PD and DMI, the inclusion of BW0.75 in the models with PD:C and ALLA:C as predictors slightly decreased the values of root mean square error (RMSE) and Akaike information criterion for the models of DMI. Our models suggest that both DMI and dDMI can be equally well predicted by PD-related variables; however, predicting DMI seems more useful from a practical and experimental standpoint. The inclusion of MY into the dairy models substantially decreased RMSE and Akaike information criterion values, and further increased the precision of the equations. The model including PD:C, BW0.75, and MY presented greater concordance correlation coefficient (0.93 and 0.63 for trials 1 and 2, respectively) and lower RMSE of prediction (1.90 and 3.35 kg/d for trials 1 and 2, respectively) when tested in the validation data set, emerging as a potentially useful estimator of nutrient intake in dairy cows. Endogenous PD excretion was estimated by the intercept of the linear regression between DMI (g/kg of BW0.75) and PD excretion (mmol/kg of BW0.75) for beef (0.404 mmol/kg of BW0.75) and dairy cattle (0.651 mmol/kg of BW0.75). Based on the very close agreement between our results for beef cattle and the literature, the linear regression appears to be an adequate method to estimate endogenous PD excretion.  
  Address Department of Dairy Science, University of Wisconsin, Madison 53706. Department of Animal Science, University of Lavras, Lavras, Minas Gerais, 37200-000, Brazil. US Dairy Forage Research Center, 1925 Linden Drive West, Madison, WI 53706. Department of Dairy Science, University of Wisconsin, Madison 53706. Electronic address: learment@wisc.edu.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2017/09/04  
  ISSN 1525-3198 (Electronic) 0022-0302 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Web of Science, Scielo, and Scopus searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1464 Serial 2919  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Garcia-Morante, B.; Segales, J.; Serrano, E.; Sibila, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Determinants for swine mycoplasmal pneumonia reproduction under experimental conditions: A systematic review and recursive partitioning analysis Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication PLoS One Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 12 Issue 7 Pages e0181194  
  Keywords Swine; Pigs; Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae; Pneumonia  
  Abstract One of the main Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (M. hyopneumoniae) swine experimental model objectives is to reproduce mycoplasmal pneumonia (MP). Unfortunately, experimental validated protocols to maximize the chance to successfully achieve lung lesions induced by M. hyopneumoniae are not available at the moment. Thus, the objective of this work was to identify those factors that might have a major influence on the effective development of MP, measured as macroscopic lung lesions, under experimental conditions. Data from 85 studies describing M. hyopneumoniae inoculation experiments were compiled by means of a systematic review and analyzed thereafter. Several variables were considered in the analyses such as the number of pigs in the experiment, serological status against M. hyopneumoniae, source of the animals, age at inoculation, type of inoculum, strain of M. hyopneumoniae, route, dose and times of inoculation, study duration and co-infection with other swine pathogens. Descriptive statistics were used to depict M. hyopneumoniae experimental model main characteristics whereas a recursive partitioning approach, using regression trees, assessed the importance of the abovementioned experimental variables as MP triggering factors. A strong link between the time period between challenge and necropsies and lung lesion severity was observed. Results indicated that the most important factors to explain the observed lung lesion score variability were: (1) study duration, (2) M. hyopneumoniae strain, (3) age at inoculation, (4) co-infection with other swine pathogens and (5) animal source. All other studied variables were not relevant to explain the variability on M. hyopneumoniae lung lesions. The results provided in the present work may serve as a basis for debate in the search for a universally accepted M. hyopneumoniae challenge model.  
  Address IRTA, Centre de Recerca en Sanitat Animal (CReSA, IRTA-UAB), Campus de la Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra, Spain. UAB, Centre de Recerca en Sanitat Animal (CReSA, IRTA-UAB), Campus de la Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra, Spain. Departament de Sanitat i Anatomia Animals, Facultat de Veterinaria, Campus de la Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra, Spain. Servei d'Ecopatologia de Fauna Salvatge, Departament de Medicina i Cirurgia Animals, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra, Spain. Departamento de Biologia and Centro de Estudos do Ambiente e do Mar, Universidade de Aveiro, Aveiro, Portugal.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2017/07/26  
  ISSN 1932-6203 (Electronic) 1932-6203 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Medline searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1458 Serial 2914  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Getaneh, A.M.; Gebremedhin, E.Z. doi  openurl
  Title Meta-analysis of the prevalence of mastitis and associated risk factors in dairy cattle in Ethiopia Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Tropical Animal Health and Production Abbreviated Journal Trop Anim Health Prod  
  Volume 49 Issue 4 Pages 697-705  
  Keywords Cattle; Bovines; Cows; Mastitis; Prevalence; Risk Factors; Dairy cattle; Ethiopia  
  Abstract Mastitis is among the most prevalent disease that contributes for the reduction of milk production in dairy herds. Although several published studies have estimated the prevalence of mastitis, variation among studies is great. The objective of the present meta-analysis was to provide a pooled estimate of the prevalence of overall, clinical, and subclinical mastitis in dairy cattle in Ethiopia. A pooled estimate was also conducted by potential risk factors. The literature search was restricted to studies published in English language from January 2002 to June 2016. Meta-analysis of 39 studies was done under random effects model using metafor package in R software. The pooled estimate of the overall prevalence of mastitis on cow-basis was found to be 47.0% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 42.0, 52.0). The pooled prevalence with the 95% CI for clinical and subclinical mastitis was 8.3% (95% CI = 6.5, 10.3) and 37% (95% CI = 32.9, 40.7) respectively. There is a statistically significant and high heterogeneity of the prevalence estimates between published studies. The odds of occurrence of mastitis were higher in cows at early (odds ratio [OR] = 1.6; 95% CI = 1.4, 1.8) and late lactation (OR = 1.3; 95% CI = 1.2, 1.5) than mid lactation, in cows with 3-4 (OR = 1.5; 95% CI = 1.4, 1.7) and >4 parity number (OR = 2.9; 95% CI = 2.6, 3.4) than those with 1-2 parity number. Previous history of mastitis, floor type, milking hygiene, and udder injury had also statistically significant effect on pooled prevalence of mastitis (P < 0.05). The present study reported that there is high prevalence of mastitis in dairy cows in Ethiopia, which could contribute to the low productivity in lactating cows. The statistically significant association of risk factors such as floor type, milking hygiene, and presence of udder injury with mastitis may suggest that dairy farmers can reduce the occurrence of the disease by improving their management practices.  
  Address College of Agriculture and Veterinary Science, Department of Veterinary Laboratory Technology, Ambo University, P. O. Box 19, Ambo, Ethiopia. abrahamgetaneh@yahoo.com. College of Agriculture and Veterinary Science, Department of Veterinary Laboratory Technology, Ambo University, P. O. Box 19, Ambo, Ethiopia.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2017/02/12  
  ISSN 1573-7438 (Electronic) 0049-4747 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, Science Direct, Google Scholar, and journals such as “Mastitis” and “Ethiopia” searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1440 Serial 2892  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Guldemond, R.A.R.; Purdon, A.; van Aarde, R.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A systematic review of elephant impact across Africa Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication PLoS One Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 12 Issue 6 Pages e0178935  
  Keywords Elephants; Environment; Africa  
  Abstract Contradictory findings among scientific studies that address a particular issue may impede the conversion of science to management implementation. A systematic review of peer-reviewed studies to generate a single outcome may overcome this problem. The contentious topic of the impact that a megaherbivore such as the savanna elephant have for other species and their environment can benefit from such an approach. After some 68 years, 367 peer-reviewed papers covered the topic and 51 of these papers provided sufficient data to be included in a meta-analysis. We separated the direct impact that elephants had on trees and herbs from the indirect effects on other vertebrates, invertebrates, and soil properties. Elephants have an impact on tree structure and abundance but no overall negative cascading effects for species that share space with them. Primary productivity explained a small amount of variation of elephant impact on vegetation. Elephant numbers (density), study duration, rainfall, tree cover, and the presence of artificial water and fences failed to describe patterns of impact. We conclude that published information do not support the calls made for artificially manipulating elephant numbers to ameliorate elephant impact, and call for the management of space use by elephants to maintain savanna heterogeneity.  
  Address Conservation Ecology Research Unit, Department of Zoology and Entomology, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2017/06/08  
  ISSN 1932-6203 (Electronic) 1932-6203 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Biological Sciences, Scopus, Zoological Record and Wildlife Ecology and Studies Worldwide searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1435 Serial 2893  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Jaramillo, D.; Peeler, E.J.; Laurin, E.; Gardner, I.A.; Whittington, R.J. doi  openurl
  Title Serology in Finfish for Diagnosis, Surveillance, and Research: A Systematic Review Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Aquatic Animal Health Abbreviated Journal J Aquat Anim Health  
  Volume 29 Issue 1 Pages 1-14  
  Keywords Fish; Aquatic animals; Serological  
  Abstract Historically, serological tests for finfish diseases have been underused when compared with their use in terrestrial animal health. For years the nonspecific immune response in fish was judged to make serology unreliable and inferior to the direct measurement of agent analytes. We conducted a systematic review of peer-reviewed publications that reported on the development, validation, or application of serological tests for finfish diseases. A total of 168 articles met the screening criteria; most of them were focused on salmonid pathogens (e.g., Aeromonas spp. and viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus). Before the 1980s, most publications reported the use of agglutination tests, but our review indicates that enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) has more recently become the dominant serological test. The main application of serological tests has been in the assessment of vaccine efficacy, with few applications for surveillance or demonstration of freedom from disease, despite the advantages of serological tests over direct detection at the population level. Nonlethal sampling, low cost, and postinfection persistence of antibodies make serological assays the test of choice in surveillance, especially of valuable broodstock. However, their adoption has been constrained by poor characterization and validation. The number of publications in our review reporting diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of serological tests in finfish was small (n = 7). Foreseeing a wider use of serological tests in the future for diagnostic end purposes, we offer recommendations for mitigating deficiencies in the development and evaluation of serological tests, including optimization, control of nonspecific reactions, informed cutoff points, diagnostic accuracy, and serological baseline studies. Achieving these goals will facilitate greater international recognition of serological testing in programs supporting aquatic animal health. Received March 21, 2016; accepted September 24, 2016.  
  Address a Atlantic Veterinary College , University of Prince Edward Island , 550 University Avenue, Charlottetown , Prince Edward Island C1A 4P3 , Canada. b Faculty of Veterinary Science , The University of Sydney , 425 Werombi Road, Camden , New South Wales 2570 , Australia. c Centre for Environment , Fisheries and Aquaculture Science , Barrack Road, Weymouth DT4 8UB , UK.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2017/02/07  
  ISSN 1548-8667 (Electronic) 0899-7659 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Databases not stated in abstract, full citation not yet available. Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1452 Serial 2908  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Langerhuus, L.; Miles, J. doi  openurl
  Title Proportion recovery and times to ambulation for non-ambulatory dogs with thoracolumbar disc extrusions treated with hemilaminectomy or conservative treatment: A systematic review and meta-analysis of case-series studies Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication The Verinary Journal Abbreviated Journal Vet J  
  Volume 220 Issue Pages 7-16  
  Keywords Dogs; Canine; Intervertebral Disc Displacement; Laminectomy; Lumbar Vertebrae; Thoracic Vertebrae; Neurological  
  Abstract Thoracolumbar intervertebral disc extrusion is a common cause of spinal cord dysfunction in dogs. Peer-reviewed studies reporting treatment of predominantly chondrodystrophic dogs with disc extrusion with loss of ambulation with either hemilaminectomy or conservative treatment (rest, analgesics and anti-inflammatories) were evaluated in a systematic review of the literature. Generally, the level of evidence available was low with no controlled studies and only case series available. In the meta-analysis, there was a clear trend to a greater proportion of dogs recovering and returning faster to ambulation for dogs treated with hemilaminectomy than for conservatively treated dogs. The mean proportions that recovered for neurological grades 3, 4 and 5 were 93, 93 and 61% for those treated with hemilaminectomy, and 79, 62 and 10% for those treated conservatively (Grade 3 – non-ambulatory paraparetic dogs; grade 4 – paraplegic dogs with intact deep pain perception; grade 5 – paraplegic dogs without intact deep pain perception). Due to the use of case series, these results represent between-study comparisons, thereby increasing the risk of selection bias and other biases. Data presented in this review support the current recommendations for surgical management of non-ambulatory dogs with disc-extrusion, but controlled clinical studies comparing outcomes are necessary to confirm these findings.  
  Address AniCura Aarhus Veterinary Hospital, Hasselager Centervej 12, 8260 Viby, Denmark. Electronic address: lars.langerhuus@anicura.dk. Department of Veterinary Clinical and Animal Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Dyrlaegevej 16, 1870 Frederiksberg C, Denmark.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2017/02/14  
  ISSN 1532-2971 (Electronic) 1090-0233 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Medline and CAB Abstracts searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1439 Serial 2894  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) LaVallee, E.; Mueller, M.K.; McCobb, E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A Systematic Review of the Literature Addressing Veterinary Care for Underserved Communities Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Jounrl of Applied Animal Welfare Science Abbreviated Journal Journal of Applied Animal Welfare Science  
  Volume Epublication ahead of print Issue Pages 1-14  
  Keywords Charity medine; Low price clinic; Community medicine; Low-price clinic; Underserved community  
  Abstract Currently, there is a care gap in veterinary medicine affecting low-income and underserved communities, resulting in decreased nonhuman-animal health and welfare. The use of low-price and community veterinary clinics in underserved populations is a strategy to improve companion-animal health through preventative care, spay/neuter, and other low-price care programs and services. Little research has documented the structure and effectiveness of such initiatives. This systematic review aimed to assess current published research pertaining to accessible health care, community-based veterinary medicine, and the use of community medicine in teaching programs. The review was an in-depth literature search identifying 51 publications relevant to the importance, benefits, drawbacks, and use of low-price and community clinics in underserved communities. These articles identified commonly discussed barriers to care that may prevent underserved clientele from seeking veterinary care. Five barriers were identified including the cost of veterinary care, accessibility of care, problems with or lack of veterinarian-client communication, culture/language, and lack of client education. The review also identified a need for additional research regarding evidence of effectiveness and efficiency in community medicine initiatives.  
  Address a Center for Animals and Public Policy , Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2017/06/29  
  ISSN 1532-7604 (Electronic) 1088-8705 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Databases not stated in abstract, contacting authors for details as full citation not available Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1430 Serial 2895  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Mohabbati Mobarez, A.; Bagheri Amiri, F.; Esmaeili, S. doi  openurl
  Title Seroprevalence of Q fever among human and animal in Iran; A systematic review and meta-analysis Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases Abbreviated Journal PLoS Neglected Tropicasl Diseases  
  Volume 11 Issue 4 Pages e0005521  
  Keywords Cattle; Dogs; Q fever; Coxiella burnetii; Seroprevalence; Zoonosis; Edpidemiology  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Q fever is a main zoonotic disease around the world. The aim of this meta-analysis was to estimate the overall seroprevalence of Coxiella burnetii among human and animal population in Iran. METHODS: Major national and international databases were searched from 2005 up to August 2016. We extracted the prevalence of Q fever antibodies (IgG) as the main primary outcome. We reported the prevalence of the seropositivity as point and 95% confidence intervals. RESULTS: The overall seroprevalence of IgG phase I and II antibodies of Q fever in human was 19.80% (95% CI: 16.35-23.25%) and 32.86% (95% CI: 23.80-41.92%), respectively. The herd and individual prevalence of C. burnetii antibody in goat were 93.42% (95% CI: 80.23-100.00) and 31.97% (95% CI: 20.96-42.98%), respectively. The herd and individual prevalence of Q fever antibody in sheep's were 96.07% (95% CI: 89.11-100.00%) and 24.66% (95% CI: 19.81-29.51%), respectively. The herd and individual prevalence of C. burnetii antibody in cattle were 41.37% (95% CI: 17.88-64.86%) and 13.30% (95% CI: 2.98-23.62%), respectively. Individual seropositivity of Q fever in camel and dog were 28.26% (95% CI: 21.47-35.05) and 0.55% (0.03-2.68), respectively. CONCLUSION: Seroprevalence of Q fever among human and domestic animals is considerable. Preventative planning and control of C. burnetii infections in Iran is necessary. Active surveillance and further research studies are recommended, to more clearly define the epidemiology and importance of C. burnetii infections in animals and people in Iran.  
  Address Department of Bacteriology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran, Iran. Department of Epidemiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tehran, Tehran, Iran. Urology and Nephrology Research Center, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. National Reference Laboratory of Plague, Tularemia and Q Fever, Research Centre for Emerging and Reemerging Infectious Diseases, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Akanlu, Kabudar-Ahang, Hamadan, Iran.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2017/04/11  
  ISSN 1935-2735 (Electronic) 1935-2727 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Iranmedex, Scientific Information Database (SID), Magiran, Iranian Research Institute for Information Science and Technology (IRANDOC), Google Scholar, Medline, PubMed, Science Direct, Scopus and Web of Science searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1436 Serial 2896  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Muir, W.W.; Ueyama, Y.; Noel-Morgan, J.; Kilborne, A.; Page, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A Systematic Review of the Quality of IV Fluid Therapy in Veterinary Medicine Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Frontiers in Veterinary Science Abbreviated Journal Front Vet Sci  
  Volume 4 Issue Pages 127  
  Keywords Cattle; Bovine; Colloids; Horses; Equine; Cats; Feline; Dogs; Canine; Intravenous fluids  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the quality of the veterinary literature investigating IV fluid therapy in dogs, cats, horses, and cattle. DESIGN: Systematic review. PROCEDURES: The preferred reporting of items for systematic review and meta-analysis protocols (PRISMA-P) was employed for systematic review of all relevant IV fluid therapy manuscripts published from January 1969 through December 2016 in the Commonwealth Agricultural Bureaux International (CABI) database. Independent grading systems used to evaluate manuscripts included the updated CONsolidated Standards of Reporting Trials 2012 checklist, risk of bias for animal intervention studies, criteria for levels of evidence, and methodological quality (Jadad scale). The quality of articles published before and after 2010 was compared. RESULTS: One hundred and thirty-nine articles (63 dogs, 7 cats, 39 horses, 30 cattle) from 7,258 met the inclusion criteria. More than 50% of the manuscripts did not comply with minimal requirements for reporting randomized controlled trials. The most non-compliant items included identification of specific predefined objectives or a hypothesis, identification of trial design, how sample size was determined, randomization, and blinding procedures. Most studies were underpowered and at risk for selection, performance, and detection bias. The overall quality of the articles improved for articles published after 2010. CONCLUSION AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Most of the veterinary literature investigating the administration of IV fluid therapy in dogs, cats, horses, and cattle is descriptive, does not comply with standards for evidence, or provide adequate translation to clinical practice. Authors should employ and journal editors should enforce international consensus recommendations and guidelines for publication of data from animal experiments investigating IV fluid therapy.  
  Address QTest Labs, Columbus, OH, United States. College of Veterinary Medicine, Lincoln Memorial University, Harrogate, TN, United States. Center for Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Research, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, OH, United States. Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Columbus, OH, United States.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2017/09/01  
  ISSN 2297-1769 (Print) 2297-1769 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes CABI searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1465 Serial 2920  
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