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Author Adell, A.D.; Miller, W.A.; Harvey, D.J.; Van Wormer, E.; Wuertz, S.; Conrad, P.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Individual subject meta-analysis of parameters for Giardia duodenalis shedding in animal experimental models Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication BioMed Research International Abbreviated Journal Biomed Res Int  
  Volume (down) 2014 Issue Pages 476142  
  Keywords Cattle; Mice; Rodents; Rats; Dogs; Cats; Animals; Bacterial Shedding; Diarrhea/parasitology; Disease Models, Animal; Feces/parasitology; Giardia lamblia/pathogenicity; Giardiasis/epidemiology; Giardiasis/parasitology; Giardiasis/veterinary; Humans; Prevalence  
  Abstract Giardia duodenalis is a zoonotic protozoan parasite with public health importance worldwide. While articles about animal model infectivity have been published for G. duodenalis, the studies have used diverse protocols and parameters to evaluate the infectivity of this protozoan parasite. Hence, the objectives of this study were to (1) conduct a meta-analysis of published literature for cyst shedding and diarrhea outcomes in animal models and (2) develop recommendations to help standardize experimental dose response studies. Results showed that, for the outcome of cyst shedding in faeces, the covariates of infective stage (cyst versus trophozoite), Giardia dose, and the interactions between doses and infective stage, as well as dose and species of experimental host, were all significant (P value </= 0.05). This study suggests inoculation of the experimental host with cysts rather than trophozoites and administration of higher doses of Giardia will most likely result in cyst shedding. Based on the results of this meta-analysis, the infective stage (cyst versus trophozoite), parasite dose, and the interactions between dose and infective stage, as well as dose and species of experimental host, should be considered when designing experimental dose response studies that will assist in the study of zoonotic neglected tropical diseases globally.  
  Address Department of Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology, School of Veterinary Medicine, One Shields Avenue, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA ; Escuela de Medicina Veterinaria, Facultad de Ecologia y Recursos Naturales, Universidad Andres Bello, Republica 440, 8370251 Santiago, Chile. Department of Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology, School of Veterinary Medicine, One Shields Avenue, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA ; One Health Institute, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA. Department of Public Health Sciences, School of Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA. One Health Institute, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA. Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering, College of Engineering, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA ; Singapore Centre on Environmental Life Sciences Engineering (SCELSE), School of Biological Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 60 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637551 ; School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 60 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637551.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2014/05/07  
  ISSN 2314-6141 (Electronic) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed and Web of Science searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1227 Serial 2716  
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Author Yun, Y.; Kim, K.; Choi, I.; Ko, S.G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Topical herbal application in the management of atopic dermatitis: a review of animal studies Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Mediators of Inflammation Abbreviated Journal Mediators Inflamm  
  Volume (down) 2014 Issue Pages 752103  
  Keywords Administration, Topical Animals Dermatitis, Atopic/ drug therapy Plant Extracts/ administration & dosage/ therapeutic use Skin/drug effects/pathology  
  Abstract Herbs are widely used in the treatment of atopic dermatitis (AD) in Eastern Asian countries, and certain herbs regarded have anti-inflammatory properties that can help with AD. With the goal of developing a topical herbal agent for AD, we conducted a systematic review of in vivo studies of AD-like skin models for screening potential herbs. Searches were conducted from PubMed and EMBASE. After all, 22 studies were included for this review. We judged most of the domains of all studies to be at unclear risk of bias. Among 22 included studies, 21 herbs have been reported to reduce AD-like skin lesions in mouse models by suppressing Th2 cell response. Our findings may offer potential herbs for the topical application treatment of AD.  
  Address Department of Dermatology of Korean Medicine, College of Korean Medicine, Graduate School of Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701, Republic of Korea ; Department of Dermatology of Korean Medicine, Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, No. 149 Sangil-dong, Gangdong-gu, Seoul 134-090, Republic of Korea. Department of Ophthalmology & Otorhinolaryngology & Dermatology of Korean Medicine, College of Korean Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701, Republic of Korea. Department of Dermatology of Korean Medicine, Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, No. 149 Sangil-dong, Gangdong-gu, Seoul 134-090, Republic of Korea ; Department of Ophthalmology & Otorhinolaryngology & Dermatology of Korean Medicine, College of Korean Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701, Republic of Korea. Department of Preventive Medicine, College of Korean Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701, Republic of Korea.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2014/07/16  
  ISSN 1466-1861 (Electronic) 0962-9351 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed and Embase searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1320 Serial 2801  
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Author Lefebvre, F.; Crivelli, A.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Salinity effects on anguillicolosis in Atlantic eels: a natural tool for disease control Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Marine Ecology Progress Series Abbreviated Journal Mar Ecol Progr  
  Volume (down) 471 Issue Pages 193-202  
  Keywords Protozoan, Helminth, Mollusc and Arthropod Parasites of Animals [LL822]; Aquaculture (Animals) [MM120]; Aquatic Biology and Ecology [MM300]; Water Resources [PP200]; Pathogens, Parasites and Infectious Diseases (Wild Animals) [YY700]; animal parasitic nematodes; aquatic animals; aquatic organisms; disease control; disease prevalence; epidemiology; habitat management; habitats; infection; lagoons; literature reviews; meta-analysis; nematode infections; salinity; systematic reviews; water; Anguilla rostrata; Anguillicoloides crassus; eels; European eels; France; Anguilla; Anguillidae; Anguilliformes; Osteichthyes; fishes; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; eukaryotes; Anguillicoloides; Anguillicolidae; Rhabditida; Chromadoria; Chromadorea; Nematoda; invertebrates; Developed Countries; European Union Countries; Mediterranean Region; OECD Countries; Western Europe; Europe; animal-parasitic nematodes; aquatic species; nematode parasites of animals; nematodes; nematodes of animals; [Indexed using CAB Thesaurus terms]  
  Abstract Anguillicolosis, the disease caused by the invasive nematode Anguillicoloides crassus, is one of the many threats facing the already endangered Atlantic eel species. We conducted a systematic review of literature data linking water salinity and prevalence of the infection during the continental phase of Anguilla anguilla and A. rostrata. Overall, we showed a significant negative relationship across all sites (rS=-0.42, n=77). In order to limit the effect of confounding factors (e.g. variable latitudes and parasite introduction dates), we performed a meta-analysis on the correlation coefficients calculated from data within studies (restricted period and area) and revealed a stronger negative relationship (r-=-0.75, n=13). Finally, using our long-term monitoring in a French Mediterranean lagoon, we documented a step decrease in both parasite prevalence and induced swimbladder pathologies in response to increased salinity values. Salinity effects manifested with an apparent threshold value around 15 per mil and are readily appreciable in young-of-the-year eels. To date, managing around water salinity parameters remains one of the best options to control the ever-expanding infection (both in aquaculture and in the wild) and to improve the quality of future spawners en route to the Sargasso Sea.  
  Address Biological Station of the Tour du Valat, Le Sambuc, 13200 Arles, France. a.crivelli@tourduvalat.org  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0171-8630 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Helminthological Abstracts, Web of Science and Zoological Record searched. Database record copyright CAB International 2010 Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 889 Serial 2482  
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Author Baker, N.J.; Bancroft, B.A.; Garcia, T.S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A meta-analysis of the effects of pesticides and fertilizers on survival and growth of amphibians Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Science of the Total Environment Abbreviated Journal Sci Total Environ  
  Volume (down) 449 Issue Pages 150-156  
  Keywords Amphibians/growth & development/physiology; Animals; Fertilizers/toxicity; Models, Theoretical; Pesticides/toxicity; Survival Analysis; Amphibians  
  Abstract The input of agrochemicals has contributed to alteration of community composition in managed and associated natural systems, including amphibian biodiversity. Pesticides and fertilizers negatively affect many amphibian species and can cause mortality and sublethal effects, such as reduced growth and increased susceptibility to disease. However, the effect of pesticides and fertilizers varies among amphibian species. We used meta-analytic techniques to quantify the lethal and sublethal effects of pesticides and fertilizers on amphibians in an effort to review the published work to date and produce generalized conclusions. We found that pesticides and fertilizers had a negative effect on survival of -0.9027 and growth of -0.0737 across all reported amphibian species. We also observed differences between chemical classes in their impact on amphibians: inorganic fertilizers, organophosphates, chloropyridinyl, phosphonoglycines, carbamates, and triazines negatively affected amphibian survival, while organophosphates and phosphonoglycines negatively affected amphibian growth. Our results suggest that pesticides and fertilizers are an important stressor for amphibians in agriculturally dominated systems. Furthermore, certain chemical classes are more likely to harm amphibians. Best management practices in agroecosystems should incorporate amphibian species-specific response to agrochemicals as well as life stage dependent susceptibility to best conserve amphibian biodiversity in these landscapes.  
  Address Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331-3803, USA. nick.baker@oregonstate.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2013/02/21  
  ISSN 1879-1026 (Electronic) 0048-9697 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Aquatic Sciences and Fisheries Abstract, BIOSIS, Environmental Sciences and Pollution Management, Web of Science and Wildlife and Ecology Studies Worldwide searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 885 Serial 2346  
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Author Collins, S.A.; Overland, M.; Skrede, A.; Drew, M.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effect of plant protein sources on growth rate in salmonids: meta-analysis of dietary inclusion of soybean, pea and canola/rapeseed meals and protein concentrates Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Aquaculture Abbreviated Journal Aquaculture  
  Volume (down) 400 Issue 401 Pages 85-100  
  Keywords Animal Nutrition (General) [LL500]; Forage and Feed Products (Non-human) [RR000]; Aquaculture (Animals) [MM120]; Field Crops [FF005]; animal feeding; aquaculture; aquatic animals; aquatic organisms; composition; concentrates; data analysis; diets; feeding; feeds; growth rate; meal; meta-analysis; oilmeals; pea meal; plant protein; protein concentrates; protein sources; rapeseed; rapeseed oilmeal; research; soya protein; soyabean oilmeal; soyabeans; Glycine (Fabaceae); Salmonidae; Salmoniformes; Osteichthyes; fishes; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; eukaryotes; Papilionoideae; Fabaceae; Fabales; dicotyledons; angiosperms; Spermatophyta; plants; aquatic species; feeding stuffs; protein feeds; soy protein; soyabean protein; soybean oilmeal; soybean protein; soybeans; studies; vegetable protein; [Indexed using CAB Thesaurus terms]  
  Abstract Six parallel meta-analyses were conducted to determine the effect of the dietary inclusion rate of pea meal (PM), pea protein concentrate (PPC), soybean meal (SBM), soy protein concentrate (SPC), canola/rapeseed meal (CM) and canola/rapeseed protein concentrate (CPC) on the specific growth rate (SGR) of salmonid fish. From 1794 growth studies involving the feeding of these six test ingredients to salmonid fish, 45 studies were selected for inclusion in the meta-analysis. The relationship between SGR and the dietary inclusion level of plant-based feed ingredients was calculated using Cohen's d (CD), which measures differences between control and experimental means. The results of these meta-analyses showed an increase in the dietary inclusion of SBM, SPC, CM and CPC (not PM or PPC) leads to a significant reduction in SGR. Weighted regressions of inclusion level for each test ingredient on effect size showed significant, negative linear relationships between SGR and dietary inclusions of SBM, SPC, CM and CPC. For PM and PPC, there was no significant relationship between SGR and inclusion rate. The results suggest that the effect of plant ingredients on growth performance of salmonids depends on the specific ingredients and their inclusion levels. The higher effect sizes observed when ingredients are fed at lower inclusion levels and lack of significant impact of feeding mixed diets suggest that feeding low levels of several ingredients might be beneficial.  
  Address Department of Animal and Poultry Science, University of Saskatchewan, 51 Campus Drive, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 5A8, Canada. murray.drew@usask.ca  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0044-8486 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Web of Knowledge (Web of Science?) and SCIRUS searched. Database record copyright CAB International 2010 Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1109 Serial 2378  
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Author Scotney, R.L.; McLaughlin, D.; Keates, H.L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A systematic review of the effects of euthanasia and occupational stress in personnel working with animals in animal shelters, veterinary clinics, and biomedical research facilities Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Journal of the American Veterinary Medicine Association Abbreviated Journal J Am Vet Med Assoc  
  Volume (down) 247 Issue 10 Pages 1121-1130  
  Keywords veterinary surgeons; Veterinarians; Stress; Shelter Medicine; Euthanaisa  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: The study of occupational stress and compassion fatigue in personnel working in animal-related occupations has gained momentum over the last decade. However, there remains incongruence in understanding what is currently termed compassion fatigue and the associated unique contributory factors. Furthermore, there is minimal established evidence of the likely influence of these conditions on the health and well-being of individuals working in various animal-related occupations. OBJECTIVE: To assess currently available evidence and terminology regarding occupational stress and compassion fatigue in personnel working in animal shelters, veterinary clinics, and biomedical research facilities. DATA SOURCE: Studies were identified by searching the following electronic databases with no publication date restrictions: ProQuest Research Library, ProQuest Social Science Journals, PsycARTICLES, Web of Science, Science Direct, Scopus, PsychINFO databases, and Google Scholar. Search terms included (euthanasia AND animals) OR (compassion fatigue AND animals) OR (occupational stress AND animals). STUDY APPRAISAL AND SYNTHESIS: Only articles published in English in peer-reviewed journals that included use of quantitative or qualitative techniques to investigate the incidence of occupational stress or compassion fatigue in the veterinary profession or animal-related occupations were included. On the basis of predefined criteria, 1 author extracted articles, and the data set was then independently reviewed by the other 2 authors. RESULTS: 12 articles met the selection criteria and included a variety of study designs and methods of data analysis. Seven studies evaluated animal shelter personnel, with the remainder evaluating veterinary nurses and technicians (2), biomedical research technicians (1), and personnel in multiple animal-related occupations (2). There was a lack of consistent terminology and agreed definitions for the articles reviewed. Personnel directly engaged in euthanasia reported significantly higher levels of work stress and lower levels of job satisfaction, which may have resulted in higher employee turnover, psychological distress, and other stress-related conditions. LIMITATIONS AND CONCLUSIONS: Results of this review suggested a high incidence of occupational stress and euthanasia-related strain in animal care personnel. The disparity of nomenclature and heterogeneity of research methods may contribute to general misunderstanding and confusion and impede the ability to generate high-quality evidence regarding the unique stressors experienced by personnel working with animals. The present systematic review provided insufficient foundation from which to identify consistent causal factors and outcomes to use as a basis for development of evidence-based stress management programs, and it highlights the need for further research.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2015/11/01  
  ISSN 1943-569X (Electronic) 0003-1488 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes ProQuest Research Library, ProQuest Social Science Journals, PsycARTICLES, Web of Science, Science Direct, Scopus, PsychINFO databases, and Google Scholar searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1376 Serial 2843  
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Author Theurer, M.E.; Larson, R.L.; White, B.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Systematic review and meta-analysis of the effectiveness of commercially available vaccines against bovine herpesvirus, bovine viral diarrhea virus, bovine respiratory syncytial virus, and parainfluenza type 3 virus for mitigation of bovine respiratory disease complex in cattle Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association Abbreviated Journal J Am Vet Med Assoc  
  Volume (down) 246 Issue 1 Pages 126-142  
  Keywords Cattle; Vaccination  
  Abstract Objective-To evaluate and analyze data from controlled studies on the effectiveness of vaccinating cattle with commercially available viral antigen vaccines for mitigation of the effects of bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC). Design-Systematic review and meta-analysis. Sample-31 studies comprising 88 trials. Procedures-Studies that reported the effectiveness of commercially available bovine herpesvirus-1 (BHV-1), bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV), and parainfluenza type 3 virus (PI3) vaccines for protection of cattle against BRDC or its components were included in the analysis. Studies or trials were categorized as natural exposure or experimental challenge and were further divided by the viral antigen evaluated and vaccine type (modified-live virus [MLV] or inactivated vaccine). Meta-analysis was performed; summary Mantel-Haenszel risk ratios were determined, and Forest plots were generated. Results-In natural exposure trials, beef calves vaccinated with various antigen combinations had a significantly lower BRDC morbidity risk than did nonvaccinated control calves. In trials evaluating BHV-1 and MLV BVDV vaccines in experimental challenge models, vaccinated calves had a lower BRDC morbidity risk than did control calves; however, in experimental challenge trials evaluating MLV BRSV and PI3 vaccines, no significant difference in morbidity or mortality risk was found between vaccinated and control calves. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance-Estimating clinical efficacy from results of experimental challenge studies requires caution because these models differ substantially from those involving natural exposure. The literature provides data but does not provide sufficiently strong evidence to guide definitive recommendations for determining which virus components are necessary to include in a vaccination program for prevention or mitigation of BRDC in cattle.  
  Address Department of Diagnostic Medicine and Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2014/12/18  
  ISSN 1943-569X (Electronic) 0003-1488 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, CAB (Abstracts?) and Agricola searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1292 Serial 2779  
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Author St-Pierre, N.R.; Milliken, G.A.; Bauman, D.E.; Collier, R.J.; Hogan, J.S.; Shearer, J.K.; Smith, K.L.; Thatcher, W.W. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Meta-analysis of the effects of sometribove zinc suspension on the production and health of lactating dairy cows Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association Abbreviated Journal J Am Vet Med Assoc  
  Volume (down) 245 Issue 5 Pages 550-64  
  Keywords Cattle; Dairy cattle; Milk production  
  Abstract Objective-To provide an updated evaluation of the efficacy and safety of sometribove zinc suspension (rbST-Zn), a form of recombinant bovine somatotropin, in lactating dairy cows. Design-Meta-analysis. Sample-26 studies published in peer-reviewed journals or reviewed by a regulatory agency. Procedures-To be included, a study had to involve the use of the rbST-Zn formulation available to US producers in accordance with the label instructions for treatment initiation (57 to 70 days postpartum), dose (500 mg, q 14 d), and route (SC). Results-For cows treated with rbST-Zn, mean milk, 3.5% fat-corrected milk, fat, and protein yields were increased by 4.00, 4.04, 0.144, and 0.137 kg/d (8.8, 8.89, 0.32, and 0.30 lb/d), respectively; however, the concentration of milk components did not change. Pregnancy proportion for the first 2 breeding cycles was increased by 5.4%, and pregnancy proportion for the duration of the trial was reduced by 5.5% for rbST-Zn-treated cows, compared with proportions for untreated cows. Mean body condition score (1 to 5 scale) was reduced by 0.06 points during the period of rbST-Zn use for treated cows. Administration of rbST-Zn had no effect on milk somatic cell count, the number of days to pregnancy, or inseminations per pregnancy; rates of fetal loss, twins, cystic ovaries, clinical lameness, lameness lesions, or traumatic lesions of the integumentary system; and odds of clinical mastitis or culling. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance-Results indicated that rbST-Zn administration to dairy cows effectively increases milk production with no adverse effects on cow health and well-being.  
  Address Department of Animal Science, College of Food Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2014/08/26  
  ISSN 1943-569X (Electronic) 0003-1488 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, Agricola, Web of Science and CAB Direct (CAB Abstracts?) searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1252 Serial 2740  
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Author Baird-Heinz, H.E.; Van Schoick, A.L.; Pelsor, F.R.; Ranivand, L.; Hungerford, L.L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A systematic review of the safety of potassium bromide in dogs Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association Abbreviated Journal J Am Vet Med Assoc  
  Volume (down) 240 Issue 6 Pages 705-715  
  Keywords Animals; Anticonvulsants/adverse effects; Bromides/adverse effects; Dog Diseases/chemically induced; Dogs; Potassium Compounds/adverse effects; Seizures/drug therapy/veterinary  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To critically evaluate and summarize available information on the safety of potassium bromide in dogs. DESIGN: Systematic review. SAMPLE: 111 references reporting safety information relevant to potassium bromide published between 1938 and 2011. PROCEDURES: PubMed searches without date limitations were conducted with the terms “potassium bromide” and “sodium bromide” in December 2009 and October 2011. Additional articles were identified through examination of article reference lists and book chapters on seizures in dogs and pharmacology. RESULTS: Reversible neurologic signs were the most consistently reported toxicoses and were generally associated with adjunctive potassium bromide treatment or high serum bromide concentrations. Dermatologic and respiratory abnormalities were rare in dogs. Insufficient information was available to assess the effects of potassium bromide on behavior or to determine the incidence of vomiting, weight gain, polyphagia, pancreatitis, polyuria, polydipsia, or reproductive abnormalities associated with potassium bromide administration. Evidence suggested that administration of potassium bromide with food may alleviate gastrointestinal irritation and that monitoring for polyphagia, thyroid hormone abnormalities, and high serum bromide concentrations may be beneficial. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Results suggested that potassium bromide is not an appropriate choice for treatment of every dog with seizures and that practitioners should tailor therapeutic regimens and clinical monitoring to each dog. Abrupt dietary changes or fluid therapy may compromise seizure control or increase the likelihood of adverse events. Availability of an appropriately labeled, approved potassium bromide product could provide better assurance for veterinarians and their clients of the quality, safety, and effectiveness of the product for veterinary use.  
  Address Center for Veterinary Medicine, US FDA, 7519 Standish Pl, Rockville, MD 20855, USA.  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2012/03/03  
  ISSN 1943-569X (Electronic) 0003-1488 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 830 Serial 2345  
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Author Freeman, A.C.; Platt, S.R.; Kent, M.; Hofmeister, E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title What is the evidence? Diagnosis of an intracranial lesion as a meningioma on the basis of MRI characteristics Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association Abbreviated Journal J Am Vet Med Assoc  
  Volume (down) 239 Issue 1 Pages 60-62  
  Keywords Animals; Brain Neoplasms/diagnosis/surgery/veterinary; Dog Diseases/diagnosis/radiography/surgery; Dogs; Female; Magnetic Resonance Imaging/veterinary; Meningioma/diagnosis/surgery/veterinary; Seizures/diagnosis/veterinary  
  Abstract  
  Address Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA. acf@uga.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2011/07/02  
  ISSN 1943-569X (Electronic) 0003-1488 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed and Web of Science searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 449 Serial 2425  
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Author O'Connor, A.M.; Gould, S.A.; Coetzee, J.F.; Kreuder, A.J.; Plummer, P.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title What is the evidence? Intra-abdominal administration of antimicrobial drugs to prevent peritonitis or wound infection in cattle after abdominal surgery Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association Abbreviated Journal J Am Vet Med Assoc  
  Volume (down) 239 Issue 3 Pages 314-316  
  Keywords Animals; Anti-Bacterial Agents/administration & dosage/therapeutic use; Cattle/surgery; Cattle Diseases/prevention & control; Drug Administration Schedule; Evidence-Based Practice; Infusions, Parenteral/methods/veterinary; Intraoperative Period; Peritonitis/prevention & control/veterinary; Cattle  
  Abstract  
  Address Department of Veterinary Diagnostic and Production Animal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011, USA. oconnor@iastate.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2011/08/02  
  ISSN 1943-569X (Electronic) 0003-1488 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed and CAB (Abstracts?) searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 475 Serial 2532  
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Author Aceto, H.; Miller, S.A.; Smith, G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Onset of diarrhea and pyrexia and time to detection of Salmonella enterica subsp enterica in feces in experimental studies of cattle, horses, goats, and sheep after infection per os Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association Abbreviated Journal J Am Vet Med Assoc  
  Volume (down) 238 Issue 10 Pages 1333-1339  
  Keywords Animals; Diarrhea/microbiology/pathology/veterinary; Feces/microbiology; Fever/microbiology/pathology/veterinary; Salmonella Infections, Animal/microbiology/pathology; Salmonella enterica/physiology; Species Specificity; Cattle; Horses; Goats; Sheep  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To determine time to first detection of Salmonella organisms in feces of animals after experimental infection PO and times to onset of diarrhea and pyrexia to evaluate a common method for identifying nosocomial infections on the basis of time of admission and onset of clinical signs (ie, the 3-day criterion). DESIGN: Meta-analysis. SAMPLE POPULATION: Cattle, horses, goats, and sheep experimentally infected PO with Salmonella enterica subsp enterica. PROCEDURES: Online databases were searched for published reports describing results of experimental infection of cattle, horses, goats, and sheep PO with salmonellae. Time to detection of organisms in feces as well as to onset of diarrhea and pyrexia was noted. Analysis of covariance was used to examine relationships among these variables, host species and age, and Salmonella serovar and magnitude of infecting dose. RESULTS: Forty-three studies met the criteria for inclusion. Time to detection of salmonellae in feces ranged from 0.5 to 4 days. Times to onset of diarrhea and pyrexia ranged from 0.33 to 11 days and from 0.27 to 5 days, respectively. Time to onset of diarrhea was related to host age and Salmonella serovar. No other associations were identified. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Time to detection of salmonellae in feces is unreliable for identifying hospital-acquired infections; a 3-day criterion will misidentify hospital- versus community-acquired infections. Relying on clinical indices such as times to onset of diarrhea and pyrexia to trigger fecal sampling for detection of Salmonella infection will increase the risk of environmental contamination and nosocomial spread because animals may begin shedding organisms in feces several days prior.  
  Address Department of Clinical Studies, New Bolton Center, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Kennett Square, PA 19348, USA.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2011/05/17  
  ISSN 0003-1488 (Print) 0003-1488 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, MEDLINE, AGRICOLA, Biosis Previews and CAB Abstracts searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 607 Serial 2328  
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Author Franklin, S.P.; Cook, J.L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title What is the evidence? Surgical treatment of large dogs with hip joint osteoarthritis Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association Abbreviated Journal J Am Vet Med Assoc  
  Volume (down) 238 Issue 4 Pages 440-442  
  Keywords Animals; Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip/veterinary; Dog Diseases/therapy; Dogs; Evidence-Based Medicine/methods/standards; Female; Hip Dysplasia, Canine/surgery; Hip Prosthesis/veterinary; Lameness, Animal; Osteoarthritis/therapy/veterinary  
  Abstract  
  Address Comparative Orthopaedic Laboratory College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211, USA. franklinsa@missouri.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2011/02/16  
  ISSN 0003-1488 (Print) 0003-1488 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 448 Serial 2423  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Owens, S.L.; Parnell, N.K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title What is the evidence? Portosystemic shunt in a dog Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association Abbreviated Journal J Am Vet Med Assoc  
  Volume (down) 238 Issue 7 Pages 859-861  
  Keywords Animals; Anti-Ulcer Agents/therapeutic use; Diet/veterinary; Dog Diseases/pathology/therapy; Dogs; Evidence-Based Medicine; Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage/prevention & control; Hepatic Encephalopathy/therapy/veterinary; Lactulose/administration & dosage/therapeutic use; Liver Diseases/congenital/therapy/veterinary; Male; Omeprazole/therapeutic use; Portal System/abnormalities; Stomach Ulcer/prevention & control; Treatment Outcome  
  Abstract  
  Address Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA. sowens@purdue.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2011/04/02  
  ISSN 0003-1488 (Print) 0003-1488 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes CAB Abstracts, PubMed and Veterinary Information Network (VIN) searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 478 Serial 2544  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Shaver, S.L.; Hofmeister, E.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title What is the evidence? Combination of local analgesic and opioid epidural protocols Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association Abbreviated Journal J Am Vet Med Assoc  
  Volume (down) 238 Issue 11 Pages 1410-1411  
  Keywords Analgesics, Opioid/administration & dosage; Anesthesia, Epidural/methods/veterinary; Anesthetics, Local/administration & dosage; Animals; Dogs/injuries/surgery; Evidence-Based Medicine; Female; Femoral Fractures/surgery/veterinary; Pain, Postoperative/etiology/prevention & control/veterinary; Dogs  
  Abstract  
  Address Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA. kaastel@gmail.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2011/06/02  
  ISSN 1943-569X (Electronic) 0003-1488 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 487 Serial 2594  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Smee, N.M.; Towell, T.L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title What is the evidence? Inflammatory bowel disease in a dog Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association Abbreviated Journal J Am Vet Med Assoc  
  Volume (down) 238 Issue 9 Pages 1111-1113  
  Keywords Animal Feed/analysis; Animals; Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use; Diet/veterinary; Dietary Proteins; Dog Diseases/therapy; Dogs; Female; Gastroenteritis/therapy/veterinary; Tylosin/therapeutic use  
  Abstract  
  Address Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506, USA. nsmee@vet.k-state.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2011/05/03  
  ISSN 0003-1488 (Print) 0003-1488 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 488 Serial 2600  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Aspirin, G.M.; Gordon-Evans, W.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title What is the evidence? Intervertebral disk disease Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association Abbreviated Journal J Am Vet Med Assoc  
  Volume (down) 237 Issue 10 Pages 1151-1152  
  Keywords Animals; Dog Diseases/diagnosis/surgery; Dogs; Evidence-Based Practice; Female; Intervertebral Disc Degeneration/diagnosis/surgery/veterinary; Magnetic Resonance Imaging/veterinary; Myelography/veterinary; Spinal Cord Compression/diagnosis/surgery/veterinary; Tomography, X-Ray Computed/veterinary  
  Abstract  
  Address Department of Veterinary Clinical Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61802, USA. geraldineaspirin@gmail.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2010/11/16  
  ISSN 0003-1488 (Print) 0003-1488 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 432 Serial 2341  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cook, J.L.; Cook, C.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title What is the evidence? Intervertebral disk surgery Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association Abbreviated Journal J Am Vet Med Assoc  
  Volume (down) 237 Issue 1 Pages 49-51  
  Keywords Animals; Decompression, Surgical/veterinary; Dog Diseases/diagnosis; Dogs; Intervertebral Disc Displacement/surgery/veterinary; Male; Spinal Fusion/veterinary  
  Abstract  
  Address Comparative Orthopaedic Laboratory, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211, USA. cookjl@missouri.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2010/07/02  
  ISSN 0003-1488 (Print) 0003-1488 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 440 Serial 2383  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author McKenzie, B.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title What is the evidence? There is only very weak clinical trial evidence to support the use of glucosamine and chondroitin supplements for osteoarthritis in dogs Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association Abbreviated Journal J Am Vet Med Assoc  
  Volume (down) 237 Issue 12 Pages 1382-1383  
  Keywords Animals; Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/adverse effects/therapeutic use; Chondroitin/therapeutic use; Dog Diseases/diagnosis/drug therapy; Dogs; Evidence-Based Medicine; Glucosamine/therapeutic use; Male; Osteoarthritis, Hip/diagnosis/drug therapy/veterinary  
  Abstract  
  Address Adobe Animal Hospital, 4470 El Camino Real, Los Altos, CA 94022, USA. mckenzievmd@gmail.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2010/12/16  
  ISSN 0003-1488 (Print) 0003-1488 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 467 Serial 2501  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author O'Connor, A.M.; Wellman, N.G.; Rice, M.; Funk, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Characteristics of clinical trials assessing antimicrobial treatment of bovine respiratory disease, 1970-2005 Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association Abbreviated Journal J Am Vet Med Assoc  
  Volume (down) 237 Issue 6 Pages 701-705  
  Keywords Animals; Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use; Cattle; Cattle Diseases/drug therapy; Respiratory Tract Diseases/drug therapy/veterinary; Time Factors  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate reporting of key study design features and study outcomes in trials of antimicrobial treatment of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) in North American feedlots. DESIGN: Systematic review. SAMPLE POPULATION: 29 manuscripts (41 studies) reporting antimicrobial treatment of BRD in North American feedlot cattle. PROCEDURES: A search of the electronic citation databases AGRICOLA, Commonwealth Agricultural Bureau, and PubMed was conducted to identify relevant manuscripts published between 1970 and 2005. Key study design features were extracted by 2 reviewers. RESULTS: 12 of 29 (41%) manuscripts did not disclose a funding source, and 21 (72%) had an author clearly identified as an employee of a pharmaceutical company. At the study level, 36 of 41 (88%) studies reported a random method of treatment allocation, 9 (22%) described the method of allocation sequence generation, 20 (49%) reported that study investigators were blinded to treatment, and 3 (7%) included a study size justification. No studies described the null hypothesis to be tested. Thirty-seven (90%) studies reported at least 3 outcomes; the largest number of outcomes reported was 14. It was not possible to conduct the statistical analysis as originally planned because it was not possible to discern the primary outcome for the majority of studies. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Many studies did not report key study design features that would assist critical evaluation by readers. It was not clear whether the studies failed to use the design features or failed to report them. Several nondesign features, such as reporting of the null hypothesis, a primary outcome, and sample size rationale, represent relatively new standards for reporting; however, reporting these features would substantially clarify the study objective.  
  Address Department of Veterinary Diagnostic and Production Animal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50010, USA. oconnor@iastate.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2010/09/16  
  ISSN 0003-1488 (Print) 0003-1488 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes AGRICOLA, CAB (Abstracts?) and PubMed searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 737 Serial 2535  
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