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Author Siedler, C.; Buchner, H.H.F. url  openurl
  Title Effectiveness of shock wave therapy in equine orthopaedic diseases: a review Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication Wiener Tierarztliche Monatsschrift Abbreviated Journal Wien Tierarztl Monat  
  Volume 96 Issue 11/12 Pages 262-271  
  Keywords Information and Documentation [CC300]; Non-communicable Diseases and Injuries of Animals [LL860]; Animal Surgery and Non-drug Therapy [LL884]; adverse effects; bones; databases; effects; lameness; navicular disease; orthopaedics; peripheral nerves; quality; research; reviews; shock; tendons; therapy; horses; Equus; Equidae; Perissodactyla; mammals; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; ungulates; eukaryotes; adverse reactions; data banks; efficacy; nerves; orthopedics; studies; therapeutics; [Indexed using CAB Thesaurus terms]  
  Abstract There is a considerable controversy regarding the effectiveness of extracorporeal shock wave therapy (SWT) in the management of equine orthopaedic diseases. Therefore the aim of this review was a breakdown of current SWT research including technical features, effects on tissue, potential adverse effects and the current clinical evidence for its use in musculoskeletal diseases in horses. Computerised searches were performed using Pub Med, Scopus and Web Spirs databases from 1980 to 2007. The studies were subdivided in equine experimental and clinical studies and classified according to the type of shock waver generator and to the quality of the study design. The search strategy identified a total of 39 studies in horses. These studies could be differentiated into 18 experimental studies and 21 clinical studies. Regarding the experimental studies effects of SWT were described for bone, tendons and nerves with conspicuous differences between different tissues. 61.1% of the experimental studies showed significant effects after SWT Within the clinical studies effectiveness of SWT ranged from no influence to 100% of the horses resuming full work. The majority of the clinical studies deals with proximal suspendory disease and navicular disease. 22 studies (56.4%) used a focused device or extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) and 13 studies (33.3%) used a nonfocused device or radial pressure wave therapy (RPWT). 4 studies (10.2%) compared the 2 shock wave devices: 3 of these studies showed no effects neither with ESWT nor with RPWT In the fourth study both devices caused microcracks in bone, but of different kind. The review reveals a great inhomogeneity across studies. Experimental studies show various tissue effects. Within the clinical studies there is a moderate evidence that SWT is effective in PSD and navicular disease. However due of the lack of high quality studies results should be seen with caution.  
  Address Equine Clinic (Department for Small Animals and Horses), University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna, Austria. claudia.siedler@vetmeduni.ac.at  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0043-535x ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, Scopus and Web Spirs searched. Database record copyright CAB International 2010 Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 401 Serial 2595  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bettley, C.D.; Cardwell, J.M.; Collins, L.M.; Asher, L. url  openurl
  Title A review of scientific literature on inherited disorders in domestic horse breeds Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Animal Welfare Abbreviated Journal Anim Welf  
  Volume 21 Issue 1 Pages 59-64  
  Keywords Animal Welfare [LL810]; Information and Documentation [CC300]; Animal Genetics and Breeding [LL240]; Non-communicable Diseases and Injuries of Animals [LL860]; animal welfare; breeds; databases; hereditary diseases; horse breeds; inheritance; quality of life; research; reviews; standardization; terminology; animals; Equus; horses; eukaryotes; Equidae; Perissodactyla; ungulates; mammals; vertebrates; Chordata; animal breed; animal breeds; animal rights; data banks; studies; [Indexed using CAB Thesaurus terms]  
  Abstract The full extent to which inherited disorders occur in different breeds of domestic horse (Equus caballus) has not been previously been investigated. A systematic search was carried out to review scientific literature on inherited disorders in domestic horse breeds and examine patterns in potentially inherited disorders. A two-part search was conducted: (i) electronic bibliographic databases for published studies; and (ii) existing online databases of inherited disorders in animals. A total of 230 papers were identified, discussing 102 inherited disorders in the horse. Few cases (17) were found in which disorders were reported to have a direct link to a conformational or phenotypic trait. Forty-nine breeds of domestic horse were described as being predisposed to one or more inherited disorders, but such predispositions did not distinguish between genetic or environmental causes. There were few patterns in the number of disorders to which breeds were reportedly predisposed or in the extent to which disorders were researched. The structure and grouping of disorders presented here could assist with standardisation in the terminology used for describing inherited disorders.  
  Address Preston Vets4Pets, 90 Moor Lane, Preston, Lancashire PR1 1JQ, UK. lucy.asher@nottingham.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0962-7286 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, Web of Science and Online Mendelian Inheritance in Animals searched. Database record copyright CAB International 2010 Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 528 Serial 2362  
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Author Lucas, C.; Criens-Poublon, L.J.; Cockrell, C.T.; de Haan, R.J. url  openurl
  Title Wound healing in cell studies and animal model experiments by Low Level Laser Therapy; were clinical studies justified? a systematic review Type Journal Article
  Year 2002 Publication Lasers in Medical Science Abbreviated Journal Lasers Med Sci  
  Volume 17 Issue 2 Pages 110-134  
  Keywords Animals; Humans; Laser Therapy; Wound Healing/radiation effects  
  Abstract Based on results of cell studies and animal experiments, clinical trials with Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) were performed, which finally did not demonstrate a beneficial effect on outcome of wound healing. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the evidence from cell studies and animal experiments with respect to wound healing was unequivocally in favour of LLLT, which would imply that these models might be adequate to predict treatment response in patients, or that the data of cell studies and animal experiments were inconclusive, which would mean that the clinical trials were based on insufficient evidence. We performed a systematic review of cell studies and animal experiment with LLLT on wound healing. Manuscripts were identified by searching Medline, Embase, and SPIE (the International Society for Optical Engineering). We assessed whether studies showed a beneficial effect of active treatment or not. The effect size was expressed in standardised mean difference [(SMD) the mean outcome measure of the treatment group minus the mean outcome measure of the control group, divided by the pooled standard deviation of these measurements]. In-depth analyses were performed on (1) studies in which inflicted wounds on animals were irradiated and evaluated; (2) studies with primary outcome measures on dimensions with direct reference to wound healing (ranging from acceleration of wound closure to epithelialisation, but excluding surrogate dimensions with regard to wound healing; in this case: tensile strength); (3) animal studies with 'true controls'; (4) studies in which animals functioned as their 'own controls' and (5) studies with the highest methodological quality score. The 36 included studies contained 49 outcome parameters of which 30 reported a positive effect of laser irradiation and 19 did not. Eleven studies presented exact data about the effect of active treatment and controls. The pooled effect size (SMD) over 22 outcome measures of these studies was – 1.05 (95% Cl: – 1.67 to – 0.43) in favour of LLLT. Methodological quality of the studies was poor. In-depth analysis of studies showed no significant pooled effect size in studies with highest methodological quality scores [0.06 (95% CI:- 0.42 to 0.53)]. Summarising the data of cell studies and animal experiments, reviewed in this manuscript, these studies failed to show unequivocal evidence to substantiate the decision for trials with LLLT in a large number of patients. In fact, there were no differences between the results of these experiments and clinical studies. Remarkably, we found that (almost from the introduction on) animal experiments and clinical studies that address the biological effects of LLLT on wound healing, ran simultaneously, rather than in sequence. We conclude that this type of phototherapy should not be considered a valuable (adjuvant) treatment for this selected, generally therapy-refractory condition in humans.  
  Address Department of Research and Innovation in Health Sciences, Hogeschool van Amsterdam, The Netherlands. c.lucas@fysio.hva.nl  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2002/07/30  
  ISSN 0268-8921 (Print) 0268-8921 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes MEDLINE and Embase searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 461 Serial 2488  
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Author Salamanca, C.A.; Polo, L.J.; Vargas, J. url  openurl
  Title [Canine and feline overpopulation: trends and new perspectives] Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Revista de la Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria y de Zootecnia (Bogata) Abbreviated Journal Revista de la Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria y de Zootecnia  
  Volume 58 Issue 1 Pages 45-53  
  Keywords Pets and Companion Animals [LL070]; Animal Reproduction and Embryology [LL250]; overpopulation; pets; population control; population density; reviews; stray animals; cats; dogs; Felis; Felidae; Fissipeda; carnivores; mammals; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; eukaryotes; Canis; Canidae; pet animals; strays; [Indexed using CAB Thesaurus terms]  
  Abstract Through a systematic review of literature comprising publications between 1973 and 2009, the following databases were consulted: Science Direct, EBSCO, Springer Link and MEDLINE. Key words used included stray dogs, animal-human bond, pet population, overpopulation and population control. The databases of the World Society for the Protection of Animals (WSPA) and the International Organization of Epizootics (OIE) were also consulted. The objective of the present review was to present a critical position about the pet overpopulation problem, cultural perception and relationships between human and animals, and failures associated with this relationship with the purpose of establishing possible solutions to the problem taking into consideration cultural issues. A total of 16 references were found, which, we applied the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Articles that met these criteria are those that constitute the unit of analysis of this review. As the knowledge about responsible ownership of pets is increased, the bond with them is enhanced. Only through health education, it is possible to acquire the necessary knowledge needed to avoid failures with respect to proper keeping. In this respect the veterinarian plays a pivotal role with his community.  
  Address Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria y de Zootecnia, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogota, Colombia. csalamancal@unal.edu.co  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Spanish Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0120-2952 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes ScienceDirect, Ebsco, Springerlink and MEDLINE searched. Database record copyright CAB International 2010 Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 392 Serial 2583  
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Author Rios T, S.; Rios O, L. url  openurl
  Title [Principal molecular markers used to identify Babesia bovis and Babesia bigemina] Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Revista MVZ Cordoba Abbreviated Journal Rev MVZ Cordoba  
  Volume 16 Issue 2 Pages 2470-2483  
  Keywords Protozoan, Helminth, Mollusc and Arthropod Parasites of Animals [LL822]; Diagnosis of Animal Diseases [LL886]; Genetics and Molecular Biology of Microorganisms [ZZ395]; babesiosis; cytochrome b; databases; diagnosis; diagnostic techniques; diagnostic value; DNA; genes; genetic markers; geographical distribution; identification; nucleotide sequences; protozoal infections; ribosomal RNA; tickborne diseases; Babesia bigemina; Babesia bovis; cattle; Babesia; Babesiidae; Piroplasmorida; Apicomplexa; Protozoa; invertebrates; animals; eukaryotes; Bos; Bovidae; ruminants; Artiodactyla; mammals; vertebrates; Chordata; beta-tubulin; data banks; deoxyribonucleic acid; DNA sequences; protozoal diseases; red water; rRNA; tick fever; [Indexed using CAB Thesaurus terms]  
  Abstract This paper describes the principal molecular markers used to identify B. bovis and B. bigemina reported in the scientific literature. A systematic review was designed based on the application of the PICO methodologic modified strategy to define the nucleotide sequences detected in different geographical locations and their diagnostic utility. An advanced search was made in data bases ScienceDirect, SpringerLink and PubMed. Using the terms “Babesia bovis” and “DNA” and “Babesia bigemina” and “DNA”. A total of 68 original articles were selected after the information was filtered. Both included and excluded articles were registered in tables, where its position of their status, within the study, was represented. The 68 articles were evaluated using a previously defined criteria of inclusion or exclusion. A total of 21 articles met the inclusion criteria and were included in this study. It was described the usefulness of molecular markers referenced in the scientific literature from 1995 to 2010: small-subunit ribosomal rna, cytochrome b gene, msa-1 and msa-2c gene, bv gene, elongation factor-1 alpha (ef-1 alpha ), beta-tubulin gene, sbp 1-2-3, and rap genes, its diagnostic application and its use in different geographical locations. Molecular markers used for detection of bovine babesia vary by geographic region, degree of genetic conservation and results of previous studies that conclude their diagnostic utility.  
  Address Universidad de Antioquia, Escuela de Microbiologia, Grupo de Investigacion en Microbiologia Veterinaria, Calle 67 # 53 – 108, AA 1226, Medellin, Colombia. mleonardo@udea.edu.co  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Spanish Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0122-0268 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes ScienceDirect, SpringerLink and PubMed searched. Database record copyright CAB International 2010 Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 387 Serial 2574  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Silva, V.O.; Lopes, E.; Andrade, E.F.; Sousa, R.V.; Zangeronimo, M.G.; Pereira, L.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Use of biodiesel co-products (glycerol) as alternative sources of energy in animal nutrition: a systematic review Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Archivos de Medicina Veterinaria Abbreviated Journal Arch Med Vet  
  Volume 46 Issue 1 Pages 111-20  
  Keywords Meat Producing Animals [LL120]; Egg Producing Animals [LL130]; Animal Nutrition (General) [LL500]; Feed Composition and Quality [RR300]; animal nutrition; biodiesel; broilers; bull feeding; bulls; cattle feeding; diets; energy sources; feeds; fowl feeding; glycerol; hen feeding; hens; pig feeding; poultry; reviews; sheep feeding; cattle; fowls; pigs; sheep; Brazil; Developing Countries; Latin America; America; South America; Threshold Countries; Bos; Bovidae; ruminants; Artiodactyla; mammals; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; eukaryotes; Sus scrofa; Sus; Suidae; Suiformes; Ovis; Gallus gallus; Gallus; Phasianidae; Galliformes; birds; chickens; domesticated birds; feeding stuffs; glycerin; glycerine; hogs; swine; [Indexed using CAB Thesaurus terms]  
  Abstract The recent surge in the use of biodiesel in Brazil and abroad, coupled with the availability of large amounts of glycerol, are generating interest in the use of this co-product in several ways, such as its use in animal feed. The use of glycerol in the formulation of diets caused immediate interest to obtain a highly efficient energy rich product to use in animal production. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of the use of glycerol resulting from biodiesel production as an energy supplement in animal feed, as well as establishing appropriate protocols for each species based on previous studies. Most of them using pigs, cows, bulls, sheep, laying hens and broilers. It was possible to infer from these studies that glycerol was a food ingredient suitable for replacement in diets of different animal species.  
  Address Department of Veterinary Medicine, Physiology and Pharmacology Area, Federal University of Lavras, Lavras, Minas Gerais, Brazil. vivian_osbio@yahoo.com.br  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0301-732x ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Science Direct, pubMed, Web of Science and Scielo searched. Database record copyright CAB International 2010 Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 2634 Serial 2741  
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Author Cunha, R.C.; Andreotti, R.; Garcia, M.V.; Aguirre Ade, A.; Leitao, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Calculation of the efficacy of vaccines against tick infestations on cattle Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Revista Brasileira de Parasitologia Veterinaria = Brazilian Journal of Veterinary Parasitology Abbreviated Journal Rev Bras Parasitol Vet  
  Volume 22 Issue 4 Pages 571-578  
  Keywords Cattle  
  Abstract Cattle ticks are responsible for great economic losses in cattle farming worldwide, and their main control method, chemicals, has been showing problems, whether resulting from the development of resistant strains of ticks or environmental contamination. Research studies directed toward developing vaccines against ticks are emerging. One way to evaluate those vaccines is to calculate the percentage of efficacy. The aim of this study was to analyze scientific publications archived in PubMed that used this method of assessment and discuss the main factors that may affect its calculation. Thus, 25 articles addressing this subject were selected. The percentage of efficacy was usually calculated in one of two ways, with one considering the reduced fertility of eggs and the other not. The latter method may underestimate the vaccine efficacy, and the most complete formula for calculating the efficacy reflects how much the vaccine actually affects the infestation. In our view, the use of the complete formula for calculating the percentage of efficacy is broader and more representative of the vaccine effect on the tick population.  
  Address Programa de Pos-graduacao em Ciencia Animal, Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso do Sul – UFMS, MS, Brasil, Programa de Pos-graduacao em Ciencia Animal, Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso do Sul – UFMS, MS, Brasil. Departamento de Sanidade Animal, Embrapa Gado de Corte, Empresa Brasileira de Pesquisa Agropecuaria – EMBRAPA, Campo GrandeMS, Brasil, Departamento de Sanidade Animal, Embrapa Gado de Corte, Empresa Brasileira de Pesquisa Agropecuaria – EMBRAPA, Campo Grande, MS, Brasil. Instituto de Investigacao Cientifica Tropical – IICT, Centro de Investigacao Interdisciplinar em Sanidade Animal – CIISA, Faculdade de Medicina Veterinaria, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa – UTL, Lisboa, Portugal, Instituto de Investigacao Cientifica Tropical – IICT, Centro de Investigacao Interdisciplinar em Sanidade Animal – CIISA, Faculdade de Medicina Veterinaria, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa – UTL, Lisboa, Portugal.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2014/01/30  
  ISSN 1984-2961 (Electronic) 0103-846X (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1185 Serial 2679  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Botman, J.; Vandeweerd, J.M. url  openurl
  Title [Inhalation anaesthesia for birds: an analytical review] Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Point Veterinaire Abbreviated Journal Point Vet  
  Volume 45 Issue 346(Part 1) Pages 58-63  
  Keywords Pets and Companion Animals [LL070]; Animal Physiology and Biochemistry (Excluding Nutrition) [LL600]; Veterinary Pharmacology and Anaesthesiology [LL882]; anaesthesia; blood gases; blood pressure; cardiovascular system; heart rate; inhaled anaesthetics; isoflurane; literature reviews; respiration; ventilation; birds; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; eukaryotes; anesthesia; circulatory system; inhaled anesthetics; sevoflurane [Indexed using CAB Thesaurus terms]  
  Abstract Isoflurane and sevoflurane are two gases available for inhalation anaesthesia. The objective of this article is to provide an analytical review of the effects of these anaesthetics on the cardiorespiratory parameters of birds. A literature search was conducted using the PubMed database. Eleven clinical trials were selected and evaluated using the CONSORT (Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials) Statement checklist. The two gases are comparable for most of the parameters. However, sevoflurane allowed a more rapid recovery, a smaller decrease in respiratory rate and caused fewer cardiac arrhythmias. Both gases generally induced a decrease in blood pressure, respiratory rate, and body temperature. They also caused a decrease in heart rate during the anaesthesia, the extent of which appeared to depend on the duration of the intervention and the gas concentration. Changes in respiratory parameters and blood gas values appeared to be related to the ventilation technique used (spontaneous or controlled).  
  Address Universite de Namur (UNamur) Urvi-Narilis (Unite de Recherche Veterinaire Integree, Namur Research Institute for Life Sciences), Rue de Bruxelles, 61, 5000 Namur, Belgium.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language French Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0335-4997 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed searched. Database record copyright CAB International 2010 Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1257 Serial 2745  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Asmad, K.; Nakagawa, S.; Lopez-Villalobos, N.; Kenyon, P.R.; Pain, S.J.; Blair, H.T. url  openurl
  Title Effects of maternal nutrition during pregnancy on the growth and reproductive development of male sheep: a meta-analysis Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Proceedings of the New Zealand Society of Animal Production Abbreviated Journal Proc N Z Soc Anim Prod  
  Volume 72 Issue Pages 51-7  
  Keywords Animal Reproduction and Embryology [LL250]; Animal Nutrition (General) [LL500]; growth rate; maternal nutrition; meta-analysis; models; pregnancy; reproduction; sertoli cells; sheep feeding; testes; sheep; Ovis; Bovidae; ruminants; Artiodactyla; ungulates; mammals; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; eukaryotes; gestation; testicles [Indexed using CAB Thesaurus terms]  
  Abstract Nutrient supply to the fetus is one of the crucial factors in the regulation of fetal growth and reproductive development. The effect of maternal nutrition can be exerted at all stages of fetal development, from conception until birth. A meta-analysis of maternal nutrition effects on the growth and reproductive development of male sheep offspring was undertaken using sixteen sheep studies. Eleven studies were included for prediction of the growth curves using a logistic growth model, and eleven studies were included for reproductive development and analysed using a mixed model. The meta-analysis suggested that, male sheep offspring undernourished during gestation had a significantly slower growth and lower testosterone levels while there were no statistically significant effects on testis weight, seminiferous tubule diameter or Sertoli cell count. The lack of a statistical effect on seminiferous tubule diameter and Sertoli cell count may be due to the limited number of studies examining the effects of maternal nutrition during pregnancy on male sheep offspring reproductive development. The meta-analysis reported here suggests that additional studies are warranted to more conclusively determine whether maternal nutrition during pregnancy effects male sheep growth and reproductive development.  
  Address Institute of Veterinary, Animal and Biomedical Sciences, Massey University, Private Bag 11-222, Palmerston North 4442, New Zealand. a.kari@massey.ac.nz  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0370-2731 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed and Web of Science searched. Database record copyright CAB International 2010 Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1277 Serial 2764  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Rangel, S.J.; Pare, J.; Dore, E.; Arango, J.C.; Cote, G.; Buczinski, S.; Labrecque, O.; Fairbrother, J.H.; Roy, J.P.; Wellemans, V.; Fecteau, G. url  openurl
  Title A systematic review of risk factors associated with the introduction of Mycobacterium avium spp. paratuberculosis (MAP) into dairy herds Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication The Canadian Veterinary Journal. La Revue Veterinaire Canadienne Abbreviated Journal Can Vet J  
  Volume 56 Issue 2 Pages 169-177  
  Keywords Cattle; Dairy cows  
  Abstract The objective of this study was to systematically collect and appraise the scientific evidence related to risk factors associated with the introduction of Mycobacterium avium spp. paratuberculosis (MAP) into a herd of cattle. An electronic search was conducted to collect relevant references addressing 2 specific questions: are i) purchasing/introduction of cattle into a herd, and ii) presence of wildlife or domestic animals, risk factors for the introduction of MAP into a herd? The screening was based on titles and abstracts and selected studies were fully analyzed. Seventeen manuscripts published between 1996 and 2011 were ultimately analyzed. Unit of interest was mainly the herd (n = 17). The specific description of the risk factors studied varied between studies. The principal study design was cross-sectional (n = 15). The review indicated that purchase/introduction of animals was an important risk factor and that the importance of wildlife or other domestic species as a mechanism for transmission into a cattle herd was not measurable.  
  Address Faculte de Medecine Veterinaire, Universite de Montreal, Saint-Hyacinthe, Quebec (Rangel, Dore, Arango, Buczinski, Roy, Wellemans, Fecteau); Agence Canadienne d'inspection des aliments, Saint-Hyacinthe, Quebec (Pare); Ministere de l'Agriculture, des Pecheries et de l'Alimentation du Quebec, Saint-Hyacinthe, Quebec (Cote, Labrecque, Fairbrother).  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2015/02/20  
  ISSN 0008-5286 (Print) 0008-5286 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes CAB (Abstracts), MEDLINE, PubMed, Embase and Web of Science searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1318 Serial 2799  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Vengust, M. url  openurl
  Title Hypercapnic respiratory acidosis: a protective or harmful strategy for critically ill newborn foals? Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Canadian Journal of Veterinary Research Abbreviated Journal Can J Vet Res  
  Volume 76 Issue 4 Pages 275-280  
  Keywords Horses  
  Abstract This paper reviews both the beneficial and adverse effects of permissive hypercapnic respiratory acidosis in critically ill newborn foals. It has been shown that partial carbon dioxide pressure (PCO2) above the traditional safe range (hypercapnia), has beneficial effects on the physiology of the respiratory, cardiovascular, and nervous system in neonates. In human neonatal critical care medicine permissive hypercapnic acidosis is generally well-tolerated by patients and is more beneficial to their wellbeing than normal carbon dioxide (CO2) pressure or normocapnia. Even though adverse effects of hypercapnia have been reported, especially in patients with central nervous system pathology and/or chronic infection, critical care clinicians often artificially increase PCO2 to take advantage of its positive effects on compromised neonate tissues. This is referred to as therapeutic hypercapnia. Hypercapnic respiratory acidosis is common in critically ill newborn foals and has traditionally been considered as not beneficial. A search of online scientific databases was conducted to survey the literature on the effects of hypercapnia in neonates, with emphasis on newborn foals. The dynamic status of safety levels of PCO2 and data on the effectiveness of different carbon dioxide levels are not available for newborn foals and should be scientifically determined. Presently, permissive hypercapnia should be implemented or tolerated cautiously in compromised newborn foals and its use should be based on relevant data from adult horses and other species.  
  Address Veterinary Faculty, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana SI-1115, Slovenia. modest.vengust@vf.uni-lj.si  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2013/04/02  
  ISSN 0830-9000 (Print) 0830-9000 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes MEDLINE , CAB Direct (CAB Abstracts?), AGRICOLA and Science Citation Index Expanded searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1092 Serial 2632  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Dohoo, I.R.; DesCoteaux, L.; Leslie, K.; Fredeen, A.; Shewfelt, W.; Preston, A.; Dowling, P. url  openurl
  Title A meta-analysis review of the effects of recombinant bovine somatotropin. 2. Effects on animal health, reproductive performance, and culling Type Journal Article
  Year 2003 Publication Canadian Journal of Veterinary Research Abbreviated Journal Can J Vet Res  
  Volume 67 Issue 4 Pages 252-264  
  Keywords Animals; Cattle/physiology; Female; Growth Hormone/pharmacology; Ketosis/prevention & control/veterinary; Lameness, Animal/epidemiology; Mastitis, Bovine/epidemiology; Parity; Prevalence; Reproduction/drug effects; Risk Factors; Cattle  
  Abstract This manuscript presents the results of a review of the effects of recombinant bovine somatotropin (rBST) on dairy cattle health, reproductive performance, and culling, that was carried out by an expert panel established by the Canadian Veterinary Medical Association (CVMA). The panel was established by the CVMA in response to a request from Health Canada in 1998 and their report was made public in 1999. A series of meta-analyses was used to combine data on health-related parameters that were extracted from all randomized clinical trials that had been published in peer-reviewed journals or which were provided by Health Canada from the submission by Monsanto for registration of rBST in Canada. A companion paper (1) presents the estimates of the effect of the drug on production parameters. Recombinant bovine somatotropin was found to increase the risk of clinical mastitis by approximately 25% during the treatment period but there was insufficient data to draw firm conclusions about the effects of the drug on the prevalence of subclinical intra-mammary infections. Use of rBST increased the risk of a cow failing to conceive by approximately 40%. For cows which did conceive, there was no effect on services per conception and only a small increase in average days open (5 days). Use of the drug had no effect on gestation length, but the information about a possible effect on the risk of twinning was equivocal. Cows treated with rBST had an estimated 55% increase in the risk of developing clinical signs of lameness. Few studies reported data on culling, but based on those that did, there appeared to be an increase risk of culling evident in multiparous cows. Use of the drug in 1 lactation period appeared to reduce the risk of metabolic diseases (particularly ketosis) in the early period of the subsequent lactation.  
  Address Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island C1A 4P3. dohoo@upei.ca  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2003/11/19  
  ISSN 0830-9000 (Print) 0830-9000 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes MEDLINE, AGRICOLA and CAB searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 648 Serial 2392  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Dohoo, I.R.; Leslie, K.; DesCoteaux, L.; Fredeen, A.; Dowling, P.; Preston, A.; Shewfelt, W. url  openurl
  Title A meta-analysis review of the effects of recombinant bovine somatotropin. 1. Methodology and effects on production Type Journal Article
  Year 2003 Publication Canadian Journal of Veterinary Research Abbreviated Journal Can J Vet Res  
  Volume 67 Issue 4 Pages 241-251  
  Keywords Animals; Body Composition/drug effects; Body Constitution; Canada; Cattle/physiology; Eating/drug effects; Female; Growth Hormone/pharmacology; Milk/chemistry/drug effects/secretion; Parity; Cattle  
  Abstract This manuscript presents the results of a review of the effects of recombinant bovine somatotropin (rBST) on milk production, milk composition, dry matter intake, and body condition score that was carried out by an expert panel established by the Canadian Veterinary Medical Association (CVMA). The panel was established by the CVMA in response to a request from Health Canada in 1998 and their report was made public in 1999. A series of meta-analyses was used to combine data on production and nutrition related parameters that were extracted from all randomized clinical trials, which had been published in peer-reviewed journals or which were provided by Health Canada, from the submission by Monsanto for registration of rBST in Canada. A companion paper will present the results of the effects of the drug on measures of health, reproductive performance, and culling parameters. Recombinant bovine somatotropin was found to increase milk production by 11.3% in primiparous cows and 15.6% in multiparous cows; although there was considerable variation from study to study. While some statistically significant effects on milk composition (% butterfat, protein, and lactose) were found, they were all very small. Treatment increased dry matter intake by an average 1.5 kg/day during the treatment period and dry matter intake remained elevated on into the first 60 days of the subsequent lactation. Despite the increase in dry matter intake, treated animals had lower body condition scores at the end of the treatment period, and the reduced scores persisted through until the start of the subsequent lactation.  
  Address Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island C1A 4P3. dohoo@upei.ca  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2003/11/19  
  ISSN 0830-9000 (Print) 0830-9000 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes MEDLINE, AGRICOLA, Index Veterinarius and CAB Veterinary Bulletin searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 649 Serial 2393  
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Author Jergens, A.E.; Sonea, I.M.; O'Connor, A.M.; Kauffman, L.K.; Grozdanic, S.D.; Ackermann, M.R.; Evans, R.B. url  openurl
  Title Intestinal cytokine mRNA expression in canine inflammatory bowel disease: a meta-analysis with critical appraisal Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication Comparative Medicine Abbreviated Journal Comp Med  
  Volume 59 Issue 2 Pages 153-162  
  Keywords Animals; Biopsy/veterinary; Cytokines/genetics/immunology; Dog Diseases/immunology/pathology; Dogs; Humans; Inflammatory Bowel Diseases/immunology/pathology/veterinary; Intestinal Mucosa/immunology/pathology  
  Abstract Data implicating mucosal cytokines in the pathogenesis of canine inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are limited. The aims of the present study were to report new findings of intestinal cytokine expression in dogs with IBD and to compare these data with previous studies through meta-analysis. Cytokine mRNA abundance in intestinal biopsies collected prospectively was evaluated by using a semiquantitative RT-PCR technique. For meta-analysis, an electronic database search revealed 3 clinical trials, all of which were nonrandomized (type III) case series. Prospective analysis showed that the intestines of healthy dogs and those with IBD express numerous cytokines and that a proinflammatory expression profile is not a feature of small or large-intestinal IBD. The meta-analysis data included 158 dogs characterized as healthy (n = 45), diarrheic nonIBD dogs (n = 6), nonresponders (n = 2), small-intestinal IBD (n = 41), colonic IBD (n = 25), and chronic enteropathy (n = 39). German shepherd dogs were overrepresented in 3 of the 4 studies. Healthy dogs showed mRNA expression for most cytokines including IL2, IL4, IL5, IL10, IL12, IFNgamma, TNFalpha, and TGFbeta. Only IL12 mRNA expression was increased consistently in small-intestinal IBD, whereas IBD colitis lacked consistent patterns of expression. In summary, dogs with IBD fail to express a predominant Th1- or Th2 cytokine bias in inflamed mucosa. Heterogeneity of results among these studies might be explained by numerous factors including the method of mRNA quantification, stage of disease, and demographic differences in study populations.  
  Address Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa, USA. ajergens@iastate.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2009/04/25  
  ISSN 1532-0820 (Print) 1532-0820 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes MEDLINE, CAB (Abstracts?) and VIN searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 692 Serial 2462  
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Author McKenna, S.L.; Keefe, G.P.; Tiwari, A.; VanLeeuwen, J.; Barkema, H.W. url  openurl
  Title Johne's disease in Canada part II: disease impacts, risk factors, and control programs for dairy producers Type Journal Article
  Year 2006 Publication Canadian Veterinary Journal Abbreviated Journal Can Vet J  
  Volume 47 Issue 11 Pages 1089-1099  
  Keywords Animals; Canada; Cattle; Cattle Diseases/economics/epidemiology/physiopathology/prevention & control; Dairying/methods; Euthanasia, Animal; Female; Milk/secretion; Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis/immunology/pathogenicity; Paratuberculosis/economics/epidemiology/physiopathology/prevention & control; Risk Assessment; Risk Factors  
  Abstract Part I of this 2-part review examined the clinical stages, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and epidemiology of Johne's disease, providing information relevant to Canada, where available. In Part II, a critical review of the economic impacts of the disease, risk factors, and important control measures are presented to enable Canadian bovine practitioners to successfully implement control strategies and participate in control programs. In cattle positive by enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay, there is a 2.4 times increase in the risk of their being culled, and their lactational 305-day milk production is decreased by at least 370 kg. Reduced slaughter value and premature culling account for losses of CDN dollars 1330 per year per infected 50-cow herd. Research has failed to show a consistent association between Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis test status and reduced fertility or risk of clinical or subclinical mastitis. Host level factors include age and level of exposure, along with source of exposure, such as manure, colostrum, or milk. Agent factors involve the dose of infectious agent and strains of bacteria. Environmental management factors influence the persistence of the bacteria and the level of contamination in the environment. Emphasizing a risk factor approach, various control strategies are reviewed, including a number of national control programs currently in place throughout the world, specifically Australia, The Netherlands, and the United States. By reviewing the scientific literature about Johne's disease, control of the disease could be pursued through informed implementation of rational biosecurity efforts and the strategic use of testing and culling.  
  Address Department of Health Management, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, 550 University Avenue, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island. slmckenna@upei.ca  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2006/12/07  
  ISSN 0008-5286 (Print) 0008-5286 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes MEDLINE, CAB (Abstracts?) and AGRICOLA searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 466 Serial 2500  
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Author Tiwari, A.; VanLeeuwen, J.A.; McKenna, S.L.; Keefe, G.P.; Barkema, H.W. url  openurl
  Title Johne's disease in Canada Part I: clinical symptoms, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and prevalence in dairy herds Type Journal Article
  Year 2006 Publication Canadian Veterinary Journal Abbreviated Journal Can Vet J  
  Volume 47 Issue 9 Pages 874-882  
  Keywords Animals; Canada/epidemiology; Cattle; Cattle Diseases/diagnosis/epidemiology/pathology; Diagnosis, Differential; False Negative Reactions; False Positive Reactions; Female; Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis/pathogenicity; Paratuberculosis/diagnosis/epidemiology/pathology; Prevalence; Sensitivity and Specificity  
  Abstract Recent international developments in the area of infectious disease control and nontariff trade barriers, along with possible zoonotic concerns, have provoked a revival of interest in Johne's disease in Canada and elsewhere. The bacterium causing Johne's disease, Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis, is distributed worldwide and causes chronic granulomatous enteritis, also known as paratuberculosis, in domestic and exotic ruminants, including cattle. The subclinical form of this disease results in progressive weight loss, reduced milk production, lower slaughter value, and premature culling, with possible impacts on fertility and udder health. Eventually, infection can lead to the clinical form that manifests as chronic diarrhea, emaciation, debilitation, and eventual death. Currently, available tests to detect infected animals produce many false-negative results and some false-positives, particularly in subclinically infected animals, thus making their interpretation and utilization challenging in control programs. The objective of this 2-part review is to critically review the literature about Johne's disease in dairy cattle for bovine practitioners in Canada. Part I covers the clinical stages, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and prevalence of infection in Canada, while Part II discusses impacts, risk factors, and control programs relevant to Canadian dairy farms. By reviewing the scientific literature about Johne's disease, control of the disease could be pursued through informed implementation of rational biosecurity efforts and the strategic use of testing and culling.  
  Address Department of Health Management, Atlantic Veterinary College, Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown. atiwari@upei.ca  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2006/10/05  
  ISSN 0008-5286 (Print) 0008-5286 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes MEDLINE, CAB Abstracts and AGRICOLA searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 496 Serial 2615  
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Author Van Donkersgoed, J. url  openurl
  Title Meta-analysis of field trials of antimicrobial mass medication for prophylaxis of bovine respiratory disease in feedlot cattle Type Journal Article
  Year 1992 Publication Canadian Veterinary Journal Abbreviated Journal Can Vet J  
  Volume 33 Issue 12 Pages 786-795  
  Keywords Cattle  
  Abstract One hundred and seven field trials of prophylactic mass medication for bovine respiratory disease (BRD) in feedlot cattle were reviewed. Meta-analysis is the formal quantitative statistical review process that was used to synthesize the data from randomized field trials and draw conclusions concerning the efficacy of prophylactic mass medication in feedlot calves.The results of the meta-analysis indicated that prophylactic parenteral mass medication of calves with long-acting oxytetracycline or tilmicosin on arrival at the feedlot would reduce BRD morbidity rates (p < 0.001). There were, however, unreliable data on the effects of mass medication on mortality rates and performance, insufficient data on the most effective treatment regimes, and no valid data on the efficacy of feed and water medication for prophylaxis of BRD.This review highlights the gaps in our knowledge and points out the need for additional well-designed randomized controlled field trials of adequate size to assess the efficacy and socioeconomic impact of prophylactic mass medication for BRD in feedlot cattle.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 1992/12/01  
  ISSN 0008-5286 (Print) 0008-5286 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes MEDLINE, CAB Abstracts, Procite and Current Contents searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 804 Serial 2627  
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Author Kilborn, S.H.; Trudel, G.; Uhthoff, H. url  openurl
  Title Review of growth plate closure compared with age at sexual maturity and lifespan in laboratory animals Type Journal Article
  Year 2002 Publication Contemporary Topics in Laboratory Animal Science Abbreviated Journal Contemp Top Lab Anim Sci  
  Volume 41 Issue 5 Pages 21-26  
  Keywords Age Factors; Aging; Animals; Animals, Laboratory/growth & development; Bone Development; Growth Plate/anatomy & histology/growth & development; Humans; Life Expectancy; Longevity; Sexual Maturation; Species Specificity; Rats  
  Abstract Although it is assumed that most mammals experience growth plate closure and cessation of bone growth soon after sexual maturity, bone growth in rats continues throughout their lifespan. The rat was compared to other laboratory animals to assess differences in the duration of bone growth and its relationship to age at sexual maturity and lifespan. We reviewed the literature from 1966 to March 1999 by searching MEDLINE and other databases. Growth closure times and age at sexual maturity were retrieved for the mouse, rabbit, dog, cat, sheep, cow, horse, nonhuman primates, and human. For all species, we calculated the ratios of: 1) age at growth plate closure to lifespan, 2) age at growth plate closure to age at sexual maturity, and 3) age at sexual maturity to average lifespan. The ratio of age at physis closure to the average lifespan was large for the rat (22 to 35) and showed some overlap with that of humans (17 to 25); this ratio was comparatively small in all other nonhuman species (range, 4 to 17). This finding indicates that bone growth continues in the rat for a greater proportion of their lifespan than does that in other species. The ratio of age at physis closure to age at sexual maturity was larger for the rat (5 to 6) than that for other species, indicating that bone growth continues much longer after sexual maturity in rats than in other animals. The ratio of age at sexual maturity to average lifespan was largest for humans and nonhuman primates (13 to 14), indicating the increased time to reach puberty versus that in other species. These differences are important for studies in which animal models are used in research involving bone growth.  
  Address Animal Care and Veterinary Service, Department of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1H 8M5.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2002/09/06  
  ISSN 1060-0558 (Print) 1060-0558 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes MEDLINE searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 458 Serial 2468  
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Author Cerqueira, E.S.; Almeida, R.C. de C. url  openurl
  Title [Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in foods of animal origin: a systematic review] Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Revista do Instituto Adolfo Lutz Abbreviated Journal Rev. Inst. Adolfo Lutz  
  Volume 72 Issue 4 Pages 288-300  
  Keywords Pesticide and Drug Resistance [HH410]; Meat Produce [QQ030]; Food Contamination, Residues and Toxicology [QQ200]; Prion, Viral, Bacterial and Fungal Pathogens of Humans [VV210]; animal products; antibacterial agents; detection; drug resistance; food contamination; food safety; literature reviews; meticillin; microbial contamination; strains; systematic reviews; methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus; pigs; Staphylococcus aureus; Staphylococcus; Staphylococcaceae; Bacillales; Bacilli; Firmicutes; Bacteria; prokaryotes; Sus scrofa; Sus; Suidae; Suiformes; Artiodactyla; mammals; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; eukaryotes; bacterium; food contaminants; hogs; MRSA; swine [Indexed using CAB Thesaurus terms]  
  Abstract Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a major cause of infections in humans and onset of this bacterium in hospitalized individuals has been well documented. However, a report on MRSA colonization and infection of individuals in the community, without prior contact with hospital environment, suggests the occurrence of other sources of contamination, such as the use of drugs in livestock, causing colonization of production animals with MRSA, and resulting in contamination of meat products. This study aimed at compiling and analyzing the scientific publications on the occurrence of MRSA in foods. A systematic review of the literature was performed in Lilacs, Medline and Pubmed databases, and the articles published from 2000 to 2013 were selected. A significant number of studies involving different samples was observed. Wide variations on the MRSA prevalence were found, and also on the methodologies used for the analyses. The MLST strain ST398 is commonly detected in pigs, and it was the most isolated bacterium from samples analyzed in different studies. ST8 and ST5 strains, belonging to human biovar, have also been frequently isolated, suggesting that food handlers have been a source for meat contamination with MRSA.  
  Address Escola de Nutricao, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Av. Araujo Pinho no 32, Canela, CEP: 40.110-160, Salvador, BA, Brazil. rogerianut@gmail.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Portuguese Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0073-9855 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes LILACS, MEDLINE and PubMed searched. Database record copyright CAB International 2010 Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1247 Serial 2735  
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Author Akhtar, A.Z.; Pippin, J.J.; Sandusky, C.B. url  openurl
  Title Animal studies in spinal cord injury: a systematic review of methylprednisolone Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication Alternatives to Laboratory Animals : ATLA Abbreviated Journal Altern Lab Anim  
  Volume 37 Issue 1 Pages 43-62  
  Keywords Animals; Cats; Disease Models, Animal; Dogs; Haplorhini; Humans; Methylprednisolone/ therapeutic use; Mice; Neuroprotective Agents/ therapeutic use; Predictive Value of Tests; Rabbits; Rats; Recovery of Function; Sheep; Species Specificity; Spinal Cord Injuries/ drug therapy/physiopathology  
  Abstract The objective of this study was to examine whether animal studies can reliably be used to determine the usefulness of methylprednisolone (MP) and other treatments for acute spinal cord injury (SCI) in humans. This was achieved by performing a systematic review of animal studies on the effects of MP administration on the functional outcome of acute SCI. Data were extracted from the published articles relating to: outcome; MP dosing regimen; species/strain; number of animals; methodological quality; type of injury induction; use of anaesthesia; functional scale used; and duration of follow-up. Subgroup analyses were performed, based on species or strain, injury method, MP dosing regimen, functional outcome measured, and methodological quality. Sixty-two studies were included, which involved a wide variety of animal species and strains. Overall, beneficial effects of MP administration were obtained in 34% of the studies, no effects in 58%, and mixed results in 8%. The results were inconsistent both among and within species, even when attempts were made to detect any patterns in the results through subgroup analyses. The results of this study demonstrate the barriers to the accurate prediction from animal studies of the effectiveness of MP in the treatment of acute SCI in humans. This underscores the need for the development and implementation of validated testing methods.  
  Address Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, Washington, DC, USA. aysha.akhtar@oxfordanimalethics.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2009/03/19  
  ISSN 0261-1929 (Print) 0261-1929 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 611 Serial 2333  
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