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Author Aerni, V.; Brinkhof, M.W.G.; Wechsler, B.; Oester, H.; Frohlich, E. url  openurl
  Title Productivity and mortality of laying hens in aviaries: a systematic review Type Journal Article
  Year 2005 Publication World's Poultry Science Journal Abbreviated Journal World Poultry Sci J  
  Volume 61 Issue 1 Pages 130-142, 146, 150, 154, 159, 163  
  Keywords Egg Producing Animals [LL130]; Animal Husbandry and Production [LL180]; Animal Physiology and Biochemistry (Excluding Nutrition) [LL600]; Eggs and Egg Products [QQ040]; Food Composition and Quality [QQ500]; animal housing; aviaries; beak; cages; cannibalism; egg mass; egg weight; feed conversion efficiency; feed intake; hens; laying performance; mortality; poultry; productivity; reviews; strain differences; fowls; Gallus gallus; Gallus; Phasianidae; Galliformes; birds; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; eukaryotes; chickens; death rate; domesticated birds; laying characters; [Indexed using CAB Thesaurus terms]  
  Abstract A systematic review of investigations on productivity, mortality and cannibalism of laying hens housed in aviaries is presented. In Part One we reviewed the studies that compared these parameters between laying hens housed in aviaries and in conventional cages. In Part Two we investigated the relative impact of strain, beak trimming and rearing condition on productivity and mortality in aviaries. The comparative analysis revealed that aviary hens consumed 3.0% more food than caged hens, and food conversion was 6.7% higher in aviaries than in cages. On the other hand, the mortality rate and cannibalism rate did not differ significantly between the two housing systems. The analysis of causes of variation in productivity, mortality rate and cannibalism rate in aviaries revealed a strong effect of strain. Beak trimming was associated with a reduced prevalence of cannibalism rates but had no effect on overall mortality. It also reduced egg weight and food consumption. Early access to litter during the rearing period had a positive effect on egg weight; egg mass, food conversion and mortality rate. In conclusion, we found a slightly reduced productivity of aviaries in relation to cages although the mortality rates and the prevalence of cannibalism did not differ between these housing systems. To further improve productivity and reduce mortality of hens housed in aviaries we recommend the choice of suitable strains and the implementation of improved rearing conditions including early access to litter.  
  Address Bachlerenweg 20, CH-3044 Sariswil, Switzerland. vera.aerni@bluewin.ch  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0043-9339 ISBN Medium (up)  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Web of Science searched. Database record copyright CAB International 2010 Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 285 Serial 2331  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Akhtar, A.Z.; Pippin, J.J.; Sandusky, C.B. url  openurl
  Title Animal studies in spinal cord injury: a systematic review of methylprednisolone Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication Alternatives to Laboratory Animals : ATLA Abbreviated Journal Altern Lab Anim  
  Volume 37 Issue 1 Pages 43-62  
  Keywords Animals; Cats; Disease Models, Animal; Dogs; Haplorhini; Humans; Methylprednisolone/ therapeutic use; Mice; Neuroprotective Agents/ therapeutic use; Predictive Value of Tests; Rabbits; Rats; Recovery of Function; Sheep; Species Specificity; Spinal Cord Injuries/ drug therapy/physiopathology  
  Abstract The objective of this study was to examine whether animal studies can reliably be used to determine the usefulness of methylprednisolone (MP) and other treatments for acute spinal cord injury (SCI) in humans. This was achieved by performing a systematic review of animal studies on the effects of MP administration on the functional outcome of acute SCI. Data were extracted from the published articles relating to: outcome; MP dosing regimen; species/strain; number of animals; methodological quality; type of injury induction; use of anaesthesia; functional scale used; and duration of follow-up. Subgroup analyses were performed, based on species or strain, injury method, MP dosing regimen, functional outcome measured, and methodological quality. Sixty-two studies were included, which involved a wide variety of animal species and strains. Overall, beneficial effects of MP administration were obtained in 34% of the studies, no effects in 58%, and mixed results in 8%. The results were inconsistent both among and within species, even when attempts were made to detect any patterns in the results through subgroup analyses. The results of this study demonstrate the barriers to the accurate prediction from animal studies of the effectiveness of MP in the treatment of acute SCI in humans. This underscores the need for the development and implementation of validated testing methods.  
  Address Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, Washington, DC, USA. aysha.akhtar@oxfordanimalethics.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2009/03/19  
  ISSN 0261-1929 (Print) 0261-1929 (Linking) ISBN Medium (up)  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 611 Serial 2333  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Araujo, R.B.; Faria, D.E. de; Faria Filho, D.E. de; Lima, C.G. de; Trevisan, R.B.; Souza, K.M.R. de; Sakamoto, M.I.; Souza, V.N. de url  openurl
  Title [Response surface models to predict broiler performance and elaborate economic analysis] Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Revista Brasileira de Saude e Producao Animal Abbreviated Journal Rev Bras Saude Prod An, Salvador  
  Volume 12 Issue 3 Pages 770-783  
  Keywords Agricultural Economics [EE110]; Meat Producing Animals [LL120]; Techniques and Methodology [ZZ900]; broiler performance; broilers; economic analysis; feed conversion; liveweight gain; models; poultry; poultry farming; systematic reviews; fowls; Gallus gallus; Gallus; Phasianidae; Galliformes; birds; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; eukaryotes; chickens; domesticated birds; liveweight gains; [Indexed using CAB Thesaurus terms]  
  Abstract The study was carried out to elaborate response surface models through broiler performance data recovered from literature in order to predict performance and develop economic analysis. Three hundred and twenty eight studies published between 2005 and 2009 were retrieved using the systematic review of literature method. Average weight gain and feed intake data were collected from twelve studies that fulfilled the preestablished inclusion criteria, and response surface models were adjusted with metabolizable energy, environmental temperature, and slaughter age as independent variables. The models for weight gain (R2=0.88) and feed conversion (R2=0.87) were accurate, precise, and not biased. There was no interaction between metabolizable energy and environmental temperature on weight gain and feed intake. The independent variables age and temperature showed interaction for weight gain and feed conversion, whereas the interaction between age and metabolizable energy was detected only for weight gain. It was possible to elaborate economic analysis to determine maximum profit, as a function of the variables included in the model, in different market situations determined by changes in broiler and feed prices. Response surface models are effective to predict broiler chickens performance and allow the development of economic analysis to optimize profitability according to market prices.  
  Address Universidade de Sao Paulo, Faculdade de Zootecnia e Engenharia de Alimentos, Departamento de Zootecnia, Pirassununga, Sao Paulo, Brazil. raquel_bighetti@yahoo.com.br  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Portuguese Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1519-9940 ISBN Medium (up)  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Biological Abstracts, CAB Abstracts, MEDLINE and SciELO searched. Database record copyright CAB International 2010 Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 288 Serial 2339  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Averos, X.; Brossard, L.; Dourmad, J.Y.; Greef, K.H. de; Edge, H.L.; Edwards, S.A.; Meunier-Salaun, M.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A meta-analysis of the combined effect of housing and environmental enrichment characteristics on the behaviour and performance of pigs Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication Applied Animal Behaviour Science Abbreviated Journal Appl Anim Behav Sci  
  Volume 127 Issue 3/4 Pages 73-85  
  Keywords Animal Behaviour [LL300]; Meat Producing Animals [LL120]; analysis; animal behaviour; animal housing; determination; effects; enrichment; estimation; group size; models; productivity; social behaviour; pigs; Sus scrofa; Sus; Suidae; Suiformes; Artiodactyla; mammals; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; ungulates; eukaryotes; animal behavior; behavior; hogs; social behavior; swine; [Indexed using CAB Thesaurus terms]  
  Abstract To quantify the combined effect of housing conditions and environmental enrichment on the behaviour and performance of pigs, a meta-analysis was performed using information from 45 experiments in 42 published manuscripts. Multiple regression models were applied to evaluate the effects of space allowance per pig (k-value; m2/BW0.667), group size (n), floor characteristics (solid, partly, or totally slatted floor), bedding (presence or absence), and the number and presentation sequence of point-source objects (no object, one object, two simultaneous objects, two alternated objects, three or more simultaneous objects or three or more alternated objects) on the general activity, enrichment and object-directed exploratory behaviour, social behaviour, and productive performance. A non-linear relationship between space allowance per pig and time spent sitting and lying was found (P<0.10 and P<0.01 for the k-value and its quadratic term respectively). Total time spent in exploration increased with space allowance per pig when bedding was present (P<0.01), and time spent exploring other pen items decreased with increasing space allowance per pig if no bedding was provided (P<0.001). Total time spent in exploration increased with group size (P<0.001). The lowest predicted total exploration time (least squares mean+or-standard error) was found in the absence of bedding and point-source objects (13+or-3%; P<0.05), and the highest when bedding (18+or-3%) or point-source objects (19+or-3%) were present. Time exploring point-source objects was higher when different objects were provided (P<0.001). Suspended (P<0.05) and deformable (P<0.05) enrichment items increased the time spent manipulating them. Time spent exploring point-source objects was predicted to be higher in the absence of slats and bedding (32+or-6%; P<0.05), and lower when bedding (8+or-9%) or slats (12+or-4%) were present. Time engaged in negative social behaviours decreased in the presence of point-source objects (P<0.01), and increased with group size in the absence of bedding (P<0.001). Time engaged in positive social behaviours tended to decrease in the presence of point-source objects (P<0.10), and when space allowance per pig increased in the absence of bedding (P<0.10). Slight trends towards lower FCR were predicted when point-source objects (P<0.10) and bedding (P=0.10) were present. This information can be utilised in the determination of the general effects of production systems on the welfare of pigs as well as in the development of new production systems.  
  Address INRA, UMR1079 Systemes d'Elevage Nutrition Animale et Humaine, F-35590 Saint-Gilles, France. Xavier.Averos@rennes.inra.fr  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0168-1591 ISBN Medium (up)  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Web of Knowledge (Web of Science?) searched. Database record copyright CAB International 2010 Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 289 Serial 2343  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Averos, X.; Brossard, L.; Dourmad, J.Y.; Greef, K.H. de; Edge, H.L.; Edwards, S.A.; Meunier-Salaun, M.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Quantitative assessment of the effects of space allowance, group size and floor characteristics on the lying behaviour of growing-finishing pigs Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication Animal : an International Journal of Animal Bioscience Abbreviated Journal Animal  
  Volume 4 Issue 5 Pages 777-783  
  Keywords Animal Welfare [LL810]; Information and Documentation [CC300]; Meat Producing Animals [LL120]; animal housing; animal welfare; body weight; effects; floors; group size; interactions; models; publications; research; slatted floors; space requirements; temperature; pigs; Sus scrofa; Sus; Suidae; Suiformes; Artiodactyla; mammals; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; ungulates; eukaryotes; animal rights; flooring; hogs; scientific publications; studies; swine; [Indexed using CAB Thesaurus terms]  
  Abstract To obtain quantitative information that can be later used in animal welfare modelling, the relationship between the lying behaviour of growing-finishing pigs (initial body weight (BW) between 19 and 87 kg) and different factors related to the housing conditions, with a potential negative effect on their welfare, was studied by means of a meta-analytical approach. Data from 22 experiments reported in 21 scientific publications were collected. The space allowance, expressed on an allometric basis by means of a k-value (m2/BW0.667), the group size (n) and the floor characteristics (fully and partly slatted v. non-slatted floor), as well as their significant two-way interactions were used as fixed effects, and the experiment was used as a random factor to take into account the interexperiment effect. Further regression analyses were performed on the predicted values of observations in order to improve the adjustment of data. A significant quadratic relationship was established between space allowance (k-value, P<0.05; squared k-value, P<0.01) and the percentage of time spent lying. A significant interaction between the k-value and the floor type was also found (P<0.05), showing that the relationship between space allowance and lying behaviour is affected by the presence or absence of slats. Threshold k-values were obtained using broken-line analyses, being about 0.039 for slatted floors and almost double for non-slatted floors. Compared to other studies, these values suggest that the ability to rest as space availability decreases may be compromised before a reduced performance becomes apparent. Group size did not show a significant effect. Additional information should be added to the model, as further data become available, to adjust the proposed parameters as well as to try to include the effect of other important aspects such as that of ambient temperature.  
  Address INRA, UMR1079 Systemes d'Elevage Nutrition Animale et Humaine, F-35590 Saint-Gilles, France. Ludovic.Brossard@rennes.inra.fr  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1751-7311 ISBN Medium (up)  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Web of Knowledge (Web of Science?) searched. Database record copyright CAB International 2010 Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 290 Serial 2344  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bashardoust Tajali, S.; Macdermid, J.C.; Houghton, P.; Grewal, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of low power laser irradiation on bone healing in animals: a meta-analysis Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Research Abbreviated Journal J Orthop Surg Res  
  Volume 5 Issue Pages 1  
  Keywords Animals; Rabbits  
  Abstract PURPOSE: The meta-analysis was performed to identify animal research defining the effects of low power laser irradiation on biomechanical indicators of bone regeneration and the impact of dosage. METHODS: We searched five electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, PubMed, CINAHL, and Cochrane Database of Randomised Clinical Trials) for studies in the area of laser and bone healing published from 1966 to October 2008. Included studies had to investigate fracture healing in any animal model, using any type of low power laser irradiation, and use at least one quantitative biomechanical measures of bone strength. There were 880 abstracts related to the laser irradiation and bone issues (healing, surgery and assessment). Five studies met our inclusion criteria and were critically appraised by two raters independently using a structured tool designed for rating the quality of animal research studies. After full text review, two articles were deemed ineligible for meta-analysis because of the type of injury method and biomechanical variables used, leaving three studies for meta-analysis. Maximum bone tolerance force before the point of fracture during the biomechanical test, 4 weeks after bone deficiency was our main biomechanical bone properties for the Meta analysis. RESULTS: Studies indicate that low power laser irradiation can enhance biomechanical properties of bone during fracture healing in animal models. Maximum bone tolerance was statistically improved following low level laser irradiation (average random effect size 0.726, 95% CI 0.08-1.37, p 0.028). While conclusions are limited by the low number of studies, there is concordance across limited evidence that laser improves the strength of bone tissue during the healing process in animal models.  
  Address Department of Physical Therapy, Elborn College, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6G1H1, Canada. sbashar@uwo.ca  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2010/01/06  
  ISSN 1749-799X (Electronic) 1749-799X (Linking) ISBN Medium (up)  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes MEDLINE, Embase, PubMed, CINAHL and Cochrane Database of Randomised Clinical Trials searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 431 Serial 2350  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Batchelor, D.J.; Devauchelle, P.; Elliott, J.; Elwood, C.M.; Freiche, V.; Gualtieri, M.; Hall, E.J.; Den Hertog, E.; Neiger, R.; Peeters, D.; Roura, X.; Savary-Bataille, K.; German, A.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Mechanisms, causes, investigation and management of vomiting disorders in cats: a literature review Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery Abbreviated Journal J Feline Med Surg  
  Volume 15 Issue 4 Pages 237-265  
  Keywords Cats  
  Abstract Vomiting is a common presenting complaint in feline practice. This article differs from previous reviews in that it is an evidence-based review of the mechanisms, causes, investigation and management of vomiting in the domestic cat. Published evidence was reviewed, and then used to make recommendations for clinical assessment, diagnosis, antiemetic drug treatment, dietary management and monitoring of cats presenting with vomiting. The strength of the evidence on which recommendations are made (and areas where evidence is lacking for cats) has been highlighted throughout.  
  Address School of Veterinary Science, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2013/02/14  
  ISSN 1532-2750 (Electronic) 1098-612X (Linking) ISBN Medium (up)  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, CAB Direct (CAB Abstracts?), Google Scholar and Web of Science searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1098 Serial 2351  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bucher, O.; Rajic, A.; Waddell, L.A.; Greig, J.; McEwen, S.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Do any spray or dip treatments, applied on broiler chicken carcasses or carcass parts, reduce Salmonella spp. prevalence and/or concentration during primary processing? A systematic review-meta-analysis Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Food Control Abbreviated Journal Food Contr  
  Volume 27 Issue 2 Pages 351-361  
  Keywords Meat Produce [QQ030]; Information and Documentation [CC300]; Techniques and Methodology [ZZ900]; Food Processing (General) [QQ100]; Food Contamination, Residues and Toxicology [QQ200]; Meat Producing Animals [LL120]; Food Service [QQ700]; broilers; carcasses; characterization; data analysis; databases; evaluation; food safety; lactic acid; meat; meta-analysis; methodology; pilot projects; poultry; processing; randomized controlled trials; research; reviews; fowls; Salmonella; Gallus gallus; Gallus; Phasianidae; Galliformes; birds; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; eukaryotes; Enterobacteriaceae; Enterobacteriales; Gammaproteobacteria; Proteobacteria; Bacteria; prokaryotes; bacterium; chickens; data banks; domesticated birds; lactate; methods; studies; [Indexed using CAB Thesaurus terms]  
  Abstract Context: Broiler chicken carcass spray and dip treatments are just two of many different interventions investigated to address the need to reduce Salmonella prevalence and concentration on broiler chicken carcasses during processing. However the results of published research are inconsistent and sometimes contradictory creating a need to formally evaluate, synthesize and summarize available research to avoid recommending ineffective treatments and identify key knowledge gaps for future work. Objective: Evaluate intervention research that measured the efficacy of various spray and dip treatments, applied on broiler chicken carcasses during primary processing, as Salmonella prevalence or concentration on broiler carcasses, using systematic review-meta-analysis (SR-MA). Data sources: A comprehensive electronic search was implemented in six databases and verified through a manual search of topic-related reference lists, related reviews or book chapters, and through consultations with selected topic experts. Study inclusion: Control and challenge trials, cohort and before-and-after intervention research published in English that investigated the efficacy of any spray or dip treatments, applied to broiler chicken carcasses or carcass parts during processing, on Salmonella prevalence or concentration measured at the same level under laboratory, pilot plant and commercial conditions. Risk of bias assessment and data extraction: Relevant research was evaluated for methodological soundness and completeness of reporting. The main characteristics of each study included in the review were extracted. Data analysis: Random-effects MA of trisodium phosphate and lactic acid dip treatments (n=12 and n=32 trials with prevalence outcomes, respectively) resulted in homogeneous (p-value=0.469; I2=0.0% and p-value=0.284; I2=11.4%, respectively) summary effect estimates (OR=1.16; 95% CI: 0.59-2.26 and OR=0.05; 95% CI: 0.03-0.10, respectively). Visual evaluation of MA forest plots indicated overall reduction trends for six spray treatments reporting concentration outcomes: trisodium phosphate (n=48 trials), acidic electrolyzed oxidizing water (n=2), cetylpyridinium chloride (n=43), lactic acid (n=24), sodium bisulfate (n=11) and potable water (n=36). Moderate to considerable heterogeneity (p-value <=0.1 and I2>25%) was observed for these treatments. Methodological soundness of included studies was poor and a lack of studies conducted under commercial conditions was observed. Conclusions: Existing research on the efficacy of broiler carcass dips or sprays on Salmonella prevalence or concentration is limited and heterogeneous, precluding the full benefits of robust meta-analyses. Larger randomized controlled trials conducted under commercial conditions are needed.  
  Address Department of Population Medicine, 2509 Stewart Building, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, N1G 2W1, Canada. arajic@uoguelph.ca  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0956-7135 ISBN Medium (up)  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes AGRICOLA, CAB, CAB Global Health, Current Contents, MEDLINE and Scopus searched. Database record copyright CAB International 2010 Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 533 Serial 2367  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Collins, S.A.; Overland, M.; Skrede, A.; Drew, M.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effect of plant protein sources on growth rate in salmonids: meta-analysis of dietary inclusion of soybean, pea and canola/rapeseed meals and protein concentrates Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Aquaculture Abbreviated Journal Aquaculture  
  Volume 400 Issue 401 Pages 85-100  
  Keywords Animal Nutrition (General) [LL500]; Forage and Feed Products (Non-human) [RR000]; Aquaculture (Animals) [MM120]; Field Crops [FF005]; animal feeding; aquaculture; aquatic animals; aquatic organisms; composition; concentrates; data analysis; diets; feeding; feeds; growth rate; meal; meta-analysis; oilmeals; pea meal; plant protein; protein concentrates; protein sources; rapeseed; rapeseed oilmeal; research; soya protein; soyabean oilmeal; soyabeans; Glycine (Fabaceae); Salmonidae; Salmoniformes; Osteichthyes; fishes; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; eukaryotes; Papilionoideae; Fabaceae; Fabales; dicotyledons; angiosperms; Spermatophyta; plants; aquatic species; feeding stuffs; protein feeds; soy protein; soyabean protein; soybean oilmeal; soybean protein; soybeans; studies; vegetable protein; [Indexed using CAB Thesaurus terms]  
  Abstract Six parallel meta-analyses were conducted to determine the effect of the dietary inclusion rate of pea meal (PM), pea protein concentrate (PPC), soybean meal (SBM), soy protein concentrate (SPC), canola/rapeseed meal (CM) and canola/rapeseed protein concentrate (CPC) on the specific growth rate (SGR) of salmonid fish. From 1794 growth studies involving the feeding of these six test ingredients to salmonid fish, 45 studies were selected for inclusion in the meta-analysis. The relationship between SGR and the dietary inclusion level of plant-based feed ingredients was calculated using Cohen's d (CD), which measures differences between control and experimental means. The results of these meta-analyses showed an increase in the dietary inclusion of SBM, SPC, CM and CPC (not PM or PPC) leads to a significant reduction in SGR. Weighted regressions of inclusion level for each test ingredient on effect size showed significant, negative linear relationships between SGR and dietary inclusions of SBM, SPC, CM and CPC. For PM and PPC, there was no significant relationship between SGR and inclusion rate. The results suggest that the effect of plant ingredients on growth performance of salmonids depends on the specific ingredients and their inclusion levels. The higher effect sizes observed when ingredients are fed at lower inclusion levels and lack of significant impact of feeding mixed diets suggest that feeding low levels of several ingredients might be beneficial.  
  Address Department of Animal and Poultry Science, University of Saskatchewan, 51 Campus Drive, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 5A8, Canada. murray.drew@usask.ca  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0044-8486 ISBN Medium (up)  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Web of Knowledge (Web of Science?) and SCIRUS searched. Database record copyright CAB International 2010 Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1109 Serial 2378  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Constable, P.D.; Shanks, R.D.; Huhn, J.; Morin, D.E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evaluation of breed as a risk factor for atresia coli in cattle Type Journal Article
  Year 1997 Publication Theriogenology Abbreviated Journal Theriogenology  
  Volume 48 Issue 5 Pages 775-790  
  Keywords Cattle; Intestinal Atresia  
  Abstract Systematic review of published cases and a hospital-based case-control study were completed to evaluate breed as a risk factor for atresia coli in cattle. Systematic review of 37 published studies indicated that atresia coli has been diagnosed in 10 cattle breeds and 12 countries, with the marked preponderance of cases occurring in Holstein-Friesian calves (485/514 cases, 94%). Epidemiologic analysis based on 28,373 cattle < 2 mo of age admitted to North American veterinary schools between 1964 and 1993 identified 291 cases of atresia coli in 13 breeds, with the marked preponderance of cases occurring in Holstein-Friesian calves (228/291, 78%). Holstein-Friesian cattle were at significantly greater risk for the condition than all other dairy cattle breeds (crude odds ratio 4.55, P < 0.0001) and all other cattle breeds (crude odds ratio 7.12, P < 0.0001), whereas there was no difference in the odds ratio between dairy cattle (not Holstein-Friesian) and beef cattle (crude odds ratio 1.68, P = 0.11). Atresia coli probably occurs secondary to vascular insufficiency of the developing colon. Holstein-Friesian cattle may be genetically predisposed to atresia coli, possibly because their developing colon grows at a faster rate and/or to a greater extent than that in other cattle breeds. Early or vigorous palpation per rectum of the amniotic vesicle appears to increase the risk of atresia coli in a genetically predisposed fetus, probably through palpation-induced damage to the developing colonic vasculature.  
  Address Department of Veterinary Clinical Medicine University of Illinois Urbana, IL 61802 USA.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2006/05/27  
  ISSN 0093-691X (Print) 0093-691X (Linking) ISBN Medium (up)  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes CAB (Abstracts?) searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 637 Serial 2381  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author EFSA Panel on Animal Health and Welfare(AHAW) url  doi
openurl 
  Title Scientific opinion on the electrical requirements for waterbath stunning equipment applicable for poultry Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication EFSA Journal Abbreviated Journal EFSA Journal  
  Volume 10 Issue 6 Pages  
  Keywords Meat Producing Animals [LL120]; Animal Slaughter [LL190]; Techniques and Methodology [ZZ900]; abattoirs; efficacy; electric current; electroencephalography; electronarcosis; equipment; hygiene; literature reviews; measurement; methodology; poultry; reviews; stunning; surveillance; systematic reviews; fowls; European Union Countries; Europe; Gallus gallus; Gallus; Phasianidae; Galliformes; birds; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; eukaryotes; chickens; domesticated birds; EEG; electrical anaesthesia; electrical current; electrical stunning; methods; metrology; slaughterhouses; [Indexed using CAB Thesaurus terms]  
  Abstract The Commission requested that EFSA review relevant new scientific references on electrical stunning of poultry and to recommend, if necessary, new electrical requirements applicable for waterbath stunning equipment. A systematic literature review was conducted to determine those electrical parameters that would deliver an effective stun so that birds would be rendered unconscious and insensible until death. Inspection data from slaughterhouse inspections conducted both in Member States in and non-Member States were included. Many of the published studies did not allow a comprehensive analysis due to different study designs and incomplete data. There are few observational studies in abattoirs to determine the numbers of birds that are effectively stunned, however, the inspection data from the Food and Veterinary Office (FVO) did not identify major problems but, for practical reasons, they used non-EEG (electro-encephalogram) methods to ascertain the effectiveness of a stun. At the present time, an EEG is the most reliable indicator of unconsciousness and insensibility. Clinical somatosensory indicators are not as reliable. The aim of a stunning system is to achieve a 100% effective stun, and the most effective electrical parameters in use can achieve an effectiveness of up to 96% as measured using EEG ascertainment methods (100% were reported as unconscious using non-EEG methods). It is recommended that the Regulation should indicate minimum current for each bird, frequency and current type as well as the wave characteristics – duty cycle and waveform. There should be better surveillance and monitoring of the electrical parameters in use at abattoirs and, in addition, methods that allow the accurate measurement of actual electrical current flowing through each bird should be further developed. Research on effective stunning should be validated by the measurement of EEG activity and related to clinical measures that are easier to use in practice.  
  Address European Food Safety Authority (EFSA), Parma, Italy. ahaw@efsa.europa.eu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1831-4732 ISBN Medium (up)  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes CAB Abstracts, CCC, FSTA, Web of Science and PubMed searched. Database record copyright CAB International 2010 Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 534 Serial 2405  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Egea-Serrano, A.; Relyea, R.A.; Tejedo, M.; Torralva, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Understanding of the impact of chemicals on amphibians: a meta-analytic review Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Ecology and Evolution Abbreviated Journal Ecol Evol  
  Volume 2 Issue 7 Pages 1382-1397  
  Keywords Toxicology and Poisoning (Wild Animals) [YY900]; exposure; heavy metals; meta-analysis; nitrogenous compounds; pesticides; phosphorus; pollutants; reviews; survival; toxic substances; wastewater; wild animals; Amphibia; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; eukaryotes; poisons; waste water; amphibians; [Indexed using CAB Thesaurus terms]  
  Abstract Many studies have assessed the impact of different pollutants on amphibians across a variety of experimental venues (laboratory, mesocosm, and enclosure conditions). Past reviews, using vote-counting methods, have described pollution as one of the major threats faced by amphibians. However, vote-counting methods lack strong statistical power, do not permit one to determine the magnitudes of effects, and do not compare responses among predefined groups. To address these challenges, we conducted a meta-analysis of experimental studies that measured the effects of different chemical pollutants (nitrogenous and phosphorous compounds, pesticides, road deicers, heavy metals, and other wastewater contaminants) at environmentally relevant concentrations on amphibian survival, mass, time to hatching, time to metamorphosis, and frequency of abnormalities. The overall effect size of pollutant exposure was a medium decrease in amphibian survival and mass and a large increase in abnormality frequency. This translates to a 14.3% decrease in survival, a 7.5% decrease in mass, and a 535% increase in abnormality frequency across all studies. In contrast, we found no overall effect of pollutants on time to hatching and time to metamorphosis. We also found that effect sizes differed among experimental venues and among types of pollutants, but we only detected weak differences among amphibian families. These results suggest that variation in sensitivity to contaminants is generally independent of phylogeny. Some publication bias (i.e., selective reporting) was detected, but only for mass and the interaction effect size among stressors. We conclude that the overall impact of pollution on amphibians is moderately to largely negative. This implies that pollutants at environmentally relevant concentrations pose an important threat to amphibians and may play a role in their present global decline.  
  Address Facultad de Biologia, Departamento de Zoologia y Antropologia Fisica, Universidad de Murcia, 30100 Murcia, Spain. aegea@um.es  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2045-7758 ISBN Medium (up)  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Web of Science, BIOSIS Previews, ScienceDirect and Scirus searched. Database record copyright CAB International 2010 Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 887 Serial 2406  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Erteld, E.; Wehrend, A.; Goericke-Pesch, S. url  openurl
  Title [Uterine torsion in cattle – frequency, clinical symptoms and theories about the pathogenesis] Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Tierarztliche Praxis. Ausgabe G, Grosstiere/Nutztiere Abbreviated Journal Tierarztl Prax Ausg G Grosstiere Nutztiere  
  Volume 40 Issue 3 Pages 167-75; quiz 176  
  Keywords Cattle  
  Abstract Aim of the present study was to summarize the available literature about the incidence, frequency, clinical symptoms and ideas as to the pathogenesis of uterine torsion in the cow. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Analysis of the literature using electronic libraries (Pub Med, Medline), German veterinary medicine journals and obstetrical textbooks. RESULTS: Uterine torsion is a very important maternal reason for dystocia as most cases occur during parturition. The post-cervical torsion (combined uterine and vaginal torsion, Torsio uteri and vaginae) is more commonly diagnosed than an intra-cervical or pre-cervical torsion. Torsions to the left occur more frequently than to the right. Clinical symptoms clearly vary depending on the degree of torsion. The frequency in relation to all parturitions is described as between 0.5 and 1%, whereas the percentage of uterine torsions presented to the veterinarian as a reason for dystocia varies between 2.7 and 65%. The pathogenesis of uterine torsion remains unclear; however, general agreement exists that the cow is predisposed to uterine torsion due to its anatomy. It appears that the Brown Swiss is more often affected than other cattle breeds.  
  Address Klinik fur Geburtshilfe, Gynakologie und Andrologie der Gross- und Kleintiere mit Tierarztlicher Ambulanz, Justus-Liebig-Universitat Giessen, Frankfurter Strasse 106, 35392 Giessen.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language German Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2012/06/13  
  ISSN 1434-1220 (Print) 1434-1220 (Linking) ISBN Medium (up)  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed and MEDLINE searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 826 Serial 2410  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Faria Filho, D.E.; Torres, K.A.A.; Faria, D.E.; Campos, D.M.B.; Rosa, P.S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Probiotics for broiler chickens in Brazil: systematic review and meta-analysis Type Journal Article
  Year 2006 Publication Brazilian Journal of Poultry Science Abbreviated Journal Braz J Poult Sci  
  Volume 8 Issue 2 Pages 89-98  
  Keywords Meat Producing Animals [LL120]; Animal Nutrition (General) [LL500]; Animal Nutrition (Production Responses) [LL520]; Feed Additives [RR130]; broiler performance; broilers; diets; feed additives; feed conversion; growth promoters; liveweight gain; poultry; probiotics; reviews; fowls; Brazil; Sao Paulo; Gallus gallus; Gallus; Phasianidae; Galliformes; birds; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; eukaryotes; South America; America; Developing Countries; Threshold Countries; Latin America; chickens; domesticated birds; efficacy; growth stimulants; liveweight gains; meta-analysis; [Indexed using CAB Thesaurus terms]  
  Abstract This study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of probiotic utilization as growth promoters in broiler chicken feeding using systematic literature review and meta-analysis. 35 studies were recovered by systematic review, 27 of which met the following criteria to be included in the meta-analysis: (1) Brazilian studies published between 1995 and 2005; (2) probiotics administered in the diet without growth promoter; and (3) results included performance data with the respective coefficient of variation. Meta-analysis revealed that the probiotics promoted better weight gain and feed conversion than the negative control (no antimicrobial) in the initial phase (1 to 20-28 days); nevertheless, results were similar to the whole duration of the study (1 to 35-48 days). Weight gain and feed conversion were similar between probiotics fed and the positive control (with antimicrobial) birds in the initial and whole experimental period. Sensitivity analysis showed that the results of meta-analysis were coherent. The funnel plots and the Egger regression method revealed that the studies published in Brazil do not present biased results. It is concluded that the probiotics are technically viable alternative to antimicrobial growth promoters in broiler feeding. Nevertheless, further studies are necessary to identify the differences among the commercially available probiotics in Brazil.  
  Address Animal Science – Faculdade de Ciencias Agrarias e Veterinarias, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Via de acesso Paulo Donato Castellane, km 5, 14.884-900. Jaboticabal, SP, Brazil. fariafilho@hotmail.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1516-635x ISBN Medium (up)  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes SciELO and CAB Abstracts searched. Database record copyright CAB International 2010 Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 320 Serial 2415  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Fratkin, J.L.; Sinn, D.L.; Patall, E.A.; Gosling, S.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Personality consistency in dogs: a meta-analysis Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication PloS One Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 8 Issue 1 Pages e54907  
  Keywords Animals; Behavior, Animal; Dogs; Personality  
  Abstract Personality, or consistent individual differences in behavior, is well established in studies of dogs. Such consistency implies predictability of behavior, but some recent research suggests that predictability cannot be assumed. In addition, anecdotally, many dog experts believe that 'puppy tests' measuring behavior during the first year of a dog's life are not accurate indicators of subsequent adult behavior. Personality consistency in dogs is an important aspect of human-dog relationships (e.g., when selecting dogs suitable for substance-detection work or placement in a family). Here we perform the first comprehensive meta-analysis of studies reporting estimates of temporal consistency of dog personality. A thorough literature search identified 31 studies suitable for inclusion in our meta-analysis. Overall, we found evidence to suggest substantial consistency (r = 0.43). Furthermore, personality consistency was higher in older dogs, when behavioral assessment intervals were shorter, and when the measurement tool was exactly the same in both assessments. In puppies, aggression and submissiveness were the most consistent dimensions, while responsiveness to training, fearfulness, and sociability were the least consistent dimensions. In adult dogs, there were no dimension-based differences in consistency. There was no difference in personality consistency in dogs tested first as puppies and later as adults (e.g., 'puppy tests') versus dogs tested first as puppies and later again as puppies. Finally, there were no differences in consistency between working versus non-working dogs, between behavioral codings versus behavioral ratings, and between aggregate versus single measures. Implications for theory, practice, and future research are discussed.  
  Address Department of Psychology, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, United States of America. fratkijl@utexas.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2013/02/02  
  ISSN 1932-6203 (Electronic) 1932-6203 (Linking) ISBN Medium (up)  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PsychInfo, Biosis, Web of Science, and ProQuest Dissertation and Theses searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1128 Serial 2424  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Freire, R.; Cowling, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The welfare of laying hens in conventional cages and alternative systems: first steps towards a quantitative comparison Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Animal Welfare Abbreviated Journal Anim Welf  
  Volume 22 Issue 1 Pages 57-65  
  Keywords Animal Welfare [LL810]; Animal Behaviour [LL300]; Egg Producing Animals [LL130]; Techniques and Methodology [ZZ900]; Non-communicable Diseases and Injuries of Animals [LL860]; animal experiments; animal housing; animal welfare; bones; cages; cannibalism; data analysis; effects; egg production; eggs; feather pecking; hens; meta-analysis; mortality; outbreaks; poultry; research; synthesis; techniques; wounds; birds; fowls; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; eukaryotes; Gallus gallus; Gallus; Phasianidae; Galliformes; animal research; animal rights; chickens; death rate; domesticated birds; pecking; studies; [Indexed using CAB Thesaurus terms]  
  Abstract Research synthesis, using techniques such as meta-analysis to combine the results of a number of studies, is a particularly useful technique when there are multiple studies with conflicting results, or where there may be conflicting interests, and can serve to extract the maximum information from animal experiments. The effect of conventional cages and alternative housing systems on measures of production, behaviour, physical and physiological condition in laying hens is an important question that would benefit from research synthesis. We found that statistical constraints did not allow the usual methods of meta-analysis, so as a first step towards quantitative comparison, we used a simple vote-counting approach based on the treatment means. We counted the number of papers in which conventional cages or alternative systems had a higher weighted mean for various response variables. Egg production was higher in conventional cages than in alternative systems, though this effect was probably mostly confined to the comparison with multi-level indoor systems. Bones were stronger from hens kept in alternative systems than those kept in conventional cages. We confirmed previous reviews that birds show more comfort behaviour and possibly dustbathing (or vacuum dustbathing) behaviour in alternative systems, but aggressive pecking did not differ between systems. Perhaps surprisingly, mortality, feather pecking and body wounds were not found to differ between systems. The latter findings suggest that the chance of a mortality or cannibalism outbreak may be no greater in alternative systems than in cage systems, but it should be noted that our analysis did not consider the magnitude of the difference in mortality. In conclusion, the meta-comparison undertaken here supports some but contradicts other conclusions reached in qualitative reviews.  
  Address School of Animal and Veterinary Sciences, Charles Sturt University, Wagga Wagga, NSW 2650, Australia. rfreire@csu.edu.au  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0962-7286 ISBN Medium (up)  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Web of Knowledge (Web of Science?) searched. Database record copyright CAB International 2010 Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 894 Serial 2426  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Frizzo, L.S.; Zbrun, M.V.; Soto, L.P.; Signorini, M.L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of probiotics on growth performance in young calves: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Animal Feed Science and Technology Abbreviated Journal Anim Feed Sci Tech  
  Volume 169 Issue 3/4 Pages 147-156  
  Keywords Pesticides and Drugs (General) [HH400]; Information and Documentation [CC300]; Animal Nutrition (General) [LL500]; Host Resistance and Immunity [HH600]; Animal Nutrition (Physiology) [LL510]; Nutrition related Disorders and Therapeutic Nutrition [VV130]; Prion, Viral, Bacterial and Fungal Pathogens of Animals [LL821]; Animal Immunology [LL650]; Microbiology (General) [ZZ390]; Milk and Dairy Produce [QQ010]; Other Produce [QQ070]; Forage and Feed Products (Non-human) [RR000]; animal nutrition; antibiotics; body weight; calves; data analysis; databases; diarrhoea; digestive system; feed conversion efficiency; feeds; gastrointestinal diseases; growth promoters; growth rate; immunity; infections; intestines; lactic acid; lactic acid bacteria; meta-analysis; milk; passive immunity; probiotics; promoters; research; weight gain; Bacteria; bacterium; prokaryotes; alimentary tract; data banks; diarrhea; feeding stuffs; gastrointestinal system; growth stimulants; lactate; promoter region; promoter sequences; scouring; studies; cattle; [Indexed using CAB Thesaurus terms]  
  Abstract Growth of calves during their first few weeks of life is one of the most important factors affecting their performance during subsequent rearing, and it can be modified by disease, especially gastrointestinal infections. Use of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) is a tool which may maintain the intestinal microbial balance, prevent diarrhea and improve growth. However, a consensus has not been reached as to whether probiotics are effective in improving growth of calves. The objective of this meta-analysis was to assess effects of probiotics on the growth of calves (i.e., body weight gain (BWG), feed efficiency). PubMed and Scopus databases were searched from 1980 to 2010, unrestricted by language. The inclusion criteria were: randomized and controlled experiments using calves less than 5 d of age without apparent disease and with passive immunity, and published in peer reviewed journals. Twenty-one and 14 studies were included to assess probiotic effects on BWG and feed efficiency, respectively. LAB supplementation increased BWG (standardized mean differences (SMD)=0.22822, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.1006-0.4638) and improve feed efficiency (SMD=-0.8141, 95% CI -1.2222 to -0.4059), considering the source of heterogeneity and publication biases. Growth of calves was not affected when the LAB was added to whole milk, but beneficial effects occurred when LAB was added to milk replacer. The probiotic effect was not related to the number of LAB strains in the inoculum. The number of calves in the experiments had an impact on the results and conclusions. Probiotics may be an alternative to the antibiotics commonly used as growth promoters in calves.  
  Address Department of Public Health, Faculty of Veterinary Science – Litoral National University, Kreder 2805, (S3080HOF) Esperanza, Province of Santa Fe, Argentina. marcelo.signorini@gmail.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0377-8401 ISBN Medium (up)  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed and Scopus searched. Database record copyright CAB International 2010 Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 324 Serial 2427  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Gartner, M.C.; Weiss, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Personality in felids: a review Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Applied Animal Behaviour Science Abbreviated Journal Appl Anim Behav Sci  
  Volume 144 Issue 1 Pages 1-13  
  Keywords Pets and Companion Animals [LL070]; Biological Resources (General) [PP700]; Techniques and Methodology [ZZ900]; Animal Behaviour [LL300]; animal behaviour; conservation; data analysis; guidelines; health; meta-analysis; methodology; objectives; personality; pets; research; reviews; techniques; temperament; terminology; cats; Felidae; Felis; Fissipeda; carnivores; mammals; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; eukaryotes; animal behavior; behavior; goals; methods; pet animals; recommendations; studies; targets; [Indexed using CAB Thesaurus terms]  
  Abstract Although there has been an increase in felid personality research, much more work is needed, with only 20 published studies, 17 of which focused on the domestic cat. Most studies show important implications for this type of research, but there is no consensus on terminology, method, or conclusions for felids, even at the species level. Felid personality research comes from various fields, and is often carried out with different methods, with diverse goals. This review evaluates the published research on felid personality, and addresses its reliability and validity. Only 60% of the studies reported reliability estimates, and these varied greatly across personality dimensions. The sample weighted mean correlation of the reliability estimates was 0.68 (based on three studies). Fifty-five percent of the studies assessed validity. The personality dimensions with the highest validity for all species were Sociable, Dominant, and Curious, with a mean correlation of 0.82. Recommendations for future research and implications for aiding in conservation and captive animal management efforts and improving health and well-being and welfare are discussed.  
  Address Department of Psychology, School of Philosophy, Psychology and Language Sciences, The University of Edinburgh, 7 George Square, Edinburgh EH8 9JZ, UK. m.c.gartner@sms.ed.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0168-1591 ISBN Medium (up)  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PsychInfo, CAB Abstracts, Web of Science, BIOSIS and MEDLINE. Database record copyright CAB International 2010 Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1100 Serial 2428  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Geburek, F.; Stadler, P. url  openurl
  Title [Regenerative therapy for tendon and ligament disorders in horses: results of treatment with stemcells, blood products, scaffolds and growth factors – review of the literature and meta analysis] Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Pferdeheilkunde Abbreviated Journal Pferdeheilkunde  
  Volume 27 Issue 6 Pages 609  
  Keywords Non-communicable Diseases and Injuries of Animals [LL860]; Animal Surgery and Non-drug Therapy [LL884]; Diagnostic, Therapeutic and Pharmacological Biotechnology [WW700]; adipose tissue; blood; blood plasma; bone marrow; bone marrow cells; embryonic stem cells; growth factors; ligaments; musculoskeletal anomalies; platelets; regeneration; relapse; stem cells; tendons; therapy; tissue repair; horses; Germany; Developed Countries; European Union Countries; OECD Countries; Western Europe; Europe; Equus; Equidae; Perissodactyla; ungulates; mammals; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; eukaryotes; blood platelets; plasma (blood); recurrence of disease; relapses; skeletomuscular anomalies; therapeutics; thrombocytes; [Indexed using CAB Thesaurus terms]  
  Abstract Conventional treatments for tendon and ligament disorders give rise to functionally inferior repair tissue within a relatively long healing phase which results in a relatively high recurrence rate. There is however increasing evidence that intralesional treatments with cells, blood products, scaffolds and biological factors such as growth factors have a regenerative effect. In the present review the principal scientific findings on the clinical effects in living horses of, for example, bone-marrow-derived and adipose-tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and blood products such as PRP (platelet rich plasma), ACP (autologous conditioned plasma) and ACS (autologous conditioned serum) are summarized and discussed. Relating to horses, several scientific investigations with different study designs can be found in the literature: (1) Clinical case series, which allow a limited comparison of different treatment methods on the basis of the resulting recurrence rate. (2) Experimental animal studies on controlled artificial tendon defects, which often provide detailed results on the histological, biochemical and biomechanical quality of repair tissue. (3) Single placebo-controlled studies of naturally occurring tendinopathies which should, at least theoretically, provide the highest degree of evidence, however show methodological weaknesses in many cases. Among other aspects, the advantages and disadvantages of the various substrates, their biological safety, their effect with regard to the structural and biomechanical properties of different tendons and ligaments and their effect on the recurrence rate of tendon and ligament disorders are described and discussed. There is increasing evidence that substrates with regenerative potential are superior to other, i.e. conventional, treatments although it is still not clear which product or combination of substrates is most appropriate in individual cases.  
  Address Fachtierarzt fur Pferde, Stiftung Tierarztliche Hochschule Hannover, Klinik fur Pferde, Bunteweg 9, 30559 Hannover, Germany. florian.geburek@tiho-hannover.de  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language German Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0177-7726 ISBN Medium (up)  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, Web of Science and Google searched. Database record copyright CAB International 2010 Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1102 Serial 2429  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Giannotti, J. di G.; Packer, I.U.; Mercadante, M.E.Z. url  doi
openurl 
  Title [Meta-analysis for estimates of genetic correlation between birth and weaning weights of cattle] Type Journal Article
  Year 2002 Publication Scientia Agricola Abbreviated Journal Sci Agric  
  Volume 59 Issue 3 Pages 435-440  
  Keywords Animal Genetics and Breeding [LL240]; Mathematics and Statistics [ZZ100]; birth weight; genetic correlation; liveweight; statistical analysis; cattle; Bos; Bovidae; ruminants; Artiodactyla; mammals; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; ungulates; eukaryotes; meta-analysis; statistical methods; [Indexed using CAB Thesaurus terms]  
  Abstract The problem of combining information from independent studies permeates almost all fields of science. Because the number of scientific articles being published has increasingly grown in the past years, combining information has become a necessity. A meta-analysis was conducted to summarize published estimates of genetic correlation between birth and weaning weights of zebu beef cattle, through the collection of estimates of 39 reports, from 1968 to 2000 [place not given]. Data were analysed by fixed and random effect models. Components of variance were obtained by the restricted maximum likelihood technique. A strong lack of homogeneity among the studies was observed. As a consequence, fixed model estimates of combined results were inappropriate. Results suggest that random effect models produce better estimates. Subgroup comparisons, for decade publication, showed heterogeneity. Meta-analysis techniques were recommended for quantitative reviews of genetic parameters.  
  Address Pos-Graduanda em Ciencia Animal e Pastagens, USP/ESALQ, CEP: 13418-900 – Piracicaba, SP, Brazil. iupacker@esalq.usp.br  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Portuguese Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0103-9016 ISBN Medium (up)  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes CAB (Abstracts?) searched. Database record copyright CAB International 2010 Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 325 Serial 2431  
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