toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print
  Records Links
Author Li, F.; Xu, M.; Cao, Y.C.; Sun, F.F.; Yang, X.J.; Yao, J.H.; Li, D.Q. url  openurl
  Title [Meta-analysis to optimizing dietary carbohydrate balance index in lactating dairy cow] Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Acta Veterinaria et Zootechnica Sinica Abbreviated Journal Acta Veterinaria et Zootechnica Sinica  
  Volume 45 Issue 9 Pages 1457-1466  
  Keywords Dairy Animals [LL110]; Animal Nutrition (General) [LL500]; Animal Nutrition (Physiology) [LL510]; Mathematics and Statistics [ZZ100]; acetates; acidosis; carbohydrate metabolism; carbohydrate modified diets; carbohydrates; cattle feeding; cows; dairy cattle; dairy cows; diets; feed conversion; forage; lactation; mathematical models; meta-analysis; milk fat; propionates; rumen; starch digestion; cattle; Bos; Bovidae; ruminants; Artiodactyla; ungulates; mammals; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; eukaryotes; butterfat; carbohydrate modifications; metabolic acidosis; saccharides; subacute ruminal acidosis; [Indexed using CAB Thesaurus terms]  
  Abstract The objective of the present study was to optimizing the dietary forage NDF (FNDF) and rumen degradable starch (RDS) content and ratios by using the meta-analysis in dairy cows. We collected 39 peered review manuscripts, which were related to FNDF or RDS content on rumen health and milk performance in dairy cows. In this study, we adopted FNDF to RDS ratio (CBIR) or their intake difference (CBID) as carbohydrate balance indexes (CBI), and evaluated their regression relationship to the ruminal pH, fermentation characteristics, milk fat and feed efficiency. The results revealed that the CBIR and CBID showed strong linear or quadratic correlation with the dependent variables. Dietary CBIR and CBID above 1. 28 or 1.09 kg.d-1 could minimize the risk of subacute ruminal acidosis, respectively. To obtain appropriate feed efficiency (>=1.5), milk fat (>=3.5%) and acetate to propionate ratio (2.2:1-3:1) in dairy cows, the CBID and CBIR should be set in the range of -0.42-0.99 kg.d-1 and 0.93-1.30, respectively. In this study, the appropriate CBID and CBIR ranges were calculated based on meta-analysis, the CBID and CBIR can reflect the change of rumen health and performance of dairy cow.  
  Address College of Animal Science and Technology, Northwest A&F University, Yangling 712100, China. xnlifei@126.com yaojunhu2004@sohu.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language (up) Chinese Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0366-6964 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Web of Science, ScienceDirect and Cambridge Online Journals searched. Database record copyright CAB International 2010 Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1323 Serial 2804  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author de Vries, S.G.; Visser, B.J.; Nagel, I.M.; Goris, M.G.; Hartskeerl, R.A.; Grobusch, M.P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Leptospirosis in Sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication International Journal of Infectious Diseases Abbreviated Journal Int J Infect Dis  
  Volume 28 Issue Pages 47-64  
  Keywords Dogs; Cattle; Sheep; Goats; Pigs; Donkeys; Camels  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Leptospirosis is an emerging zoonotic infection worldwide, possibly due to climate change and demographic shifts. It is regarded as endemic in Sub-Saharan Africa; however, for most countries scarce epidemiological data, if any, exist. The primary objectives were to describe the prevalence of leptospirosis in countries in Sub-Saharan Africa, and to develop options for prevention and control in the future. METHODS: A systematic review was conducted to determine the prevalence of leptospirosis in Sub-Saharan Africa; the PRISMA guidelines were followed. Medline/PubMed, Embase, The Cochrane Library, Web of Science, BIOSIS Previews, the African Index Medicus, AJOL, and Google Scholar were searched. RESULTS: Information about the prevalence and incidence of leptospirosis in humans is available, but remains scarce for many countries. Data are unavailable or outdated for many countries, particularly those in Central Africa. Most data are available from animals, probably due to the economic losses caused by leptospirosis in livestock. In humans, leptospirosis is an important cause of febrile illness in Sub-Saharan Africa. It concerns numerous serogroups, harboured by many different animal carriers. DISCUSSION: A wide variety of data was identified. Prevalence rates vary throughout the continent and more research, especially in humans, is needed to reliably gauge the extent of the problem. Preventive measures need to be reconsidered to control outbreaks in the future.  
  Address Center of Tropical Medicine and Travel Medicine, Department of Infectious Diseases, Division of Internal Medicine, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 9, 1100 DE, room F4-220, Amsterdam, Netherlands. Medical Library, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Netherlands. WHO/FAO/OIE and National Leptospirosis Reference Centre, KIT Biomedical Research, Amsterdam, Netherlands. Center of Tropical Medicine and Travel Medicine, Department of Infectious Diseases, Division of Internal Medicine, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 9, 1100 DE, room F4-220, Amsterdam, Netherlands. Electronic address: m.p.grobusch@amc.uva.nl.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language (up) eng Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2014/09/10  
  ISSN 1878-3511 (Electronic) 1201-9712 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, Biosis Previews, CINAHL, African Index Medicus, African Journals Online and Google Scholar searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1311 Serial 2792  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, W.; Liu, Z.; Yao, Z.; Fan, Y.; Ye, X.; Chen, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The prevalence and influencing factors of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus carriage in people in contact with livestock: A systematic review Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication American Journal of Infection Control Abbreviated Journal Am J Infect Control  
  Volume Epublication ahead of print Issue Pages  
  Keywords Animals; Livestock; Veterinary surgeons  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is becoming a serious epidemic worldwide. Recently, studies have shown that people in contact with livestock may have a greater chance of MRSA carriage. We aimed to establish the prevalence of MRSA among people in contact with livestock and review the factors influencing MRSA carriage. METHODS: We systematically examined published epidemiologic studies on MRSA prevalence in people in contact with livestock using Pubmed, Medline, Embase, Ovid, and the Cochrane Library. Prevalence estimates were pooled using a random-effects model. Study heterogeneity was assessed using Q statistics and quantified with I2 statistics. RESULTS: Thirty-three eligible studies were included in this systematic review. Prevalence of MRSA ranged from 0.0%-85.8%. The pooled prevalence estimate of MRSA was 14.2% (95% confidence interval, 9.1%-20.1%) for people in contact with livestock. Substantial heterogeneity in eligible studies was noted (chi2 = 1,025; P < .001; I2 = 96.9%). Subgroup analysis showed the prevalence of MRSA was high in people from Europe (15.9%), farmers (18.2%), and by longitudinal study design (38.9%). Animal contact and intensity of animal contact were associated with increased risk of MRSA carriage. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that there may be transmission of MRSA between animals and humans.  
  Address Guangdong Key Laboratory of Molecular Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Guangdong Pharmaceutical University, Guangzhou, China. Guangdong Key Laboratory of Molecular Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Guangdong Pharmaceutical University, Guangzhou, China. Electronic address: chensidong1@126.com.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language (up) Eng Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2015/02/15  
  ISSN 1527-3296 (Electronic) 0196-6553 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, MEDLINE, Embase, Ovid (?) and the Cochrane Library searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1314 Serial 2795  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Timsit, E.; Dendukuri, N.; Schiller, I.; Buczinski, S. doi  openurl
  Title Diagnostic accuracy of clinical illness for bovine respiratory disease (BRD) diagnosis in beef cattle placed in feedlots: A systematic literature review and hierarchical Bayesian latent-class meta-analysis Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Preventive Veterinary Medicine Abbreviated Journal Prev Vet Med  
  Volume 135 Issue Pages 67-73  
  Keywords Bovine Respiratory Disease; Cattle; Beef; Diagnostic test; Shipping fever  
  Abstract Diagnosis of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) in beef cattle placed in feedlots is typically based on clinical illness (CI) detected by pen-checkers. Unfortunately, the accuracy of this diagnostic approach (namely, sensitivity [Se] and specificity [Sp]) remains poorly understood, in part due to the absence of a reference test for ante-mortem diagnosis of BRD. Our objective was to pool available estimates of CI's diagnostic accuracy for BRD diagnosis in feedlot beef cattle while adjusting for the inaccuracy in the reference test. The presence of lung lesions (LU) at slaughter was used as the reference test. A systematic review of the literature was conducted to identify research articles comparing CI detected by pen-checkers during the feeding period to LU at slaughter. A hierarchical Bayesian latent-class meta-analysis was used to model test accuracy. This approach accounted for imperfections of both tests as well as the within and between study variability in the accuracy of CI. Furthermore, it also predicted the SeCI and SpCI for future studies. Conditional independence between CI and LU was assumed, as these two tests are not based on similar biological principles. Seven studies were included in the meta-analysis. Estimated pooled SeCI and SpCI were 0.27 (95% Bayesian credible interval: 0.12-0.65) and 0.92 (0.72-0.98), respectively, whereas estimated pooled SeLU and SpLU were 0.91 (0.82-0.99) and 0.67 (0.64-0.79). Predicted SeCI and SpCI for future studies were 0.27 (0.01-0.96) and 0.92 (0.14-1.00), respectively. The wide credible intervals around predicted SeCI and SpCI estimates indicated considerable heterogeneity among studies, which suggests that pooled SeCI and SpCI are not generalizable to individual studies. In conclusion, CI appeared to have poor Se but high Sp for BRD diagnosis in feedlots. Furthermore, considerable heterogeneity among studies highlighted an urgent need to standardize BRD diagnosis in feedlots.  
  Address Department of Production Animal Health, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada; Feedlot Health Management Services, Okotoks, AB, Canada. Electronic address: eftimsit@ucalgary.ca. Division of Clinical Epidemiology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC, Canada. Electronic address: nandini.dendukuri@mcgill.ca. Division of Clinical Epidemiology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC, Canada. Electronic address: Ian.Schiller@clinepi.mcgill.ca. Department of Clinical Science, Faculte de Medecine Veterinaire, Universite de Montreal, St-Hyacinthe, QC, Canada. Electronic address: s.buczinski@umontreal.ca.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language (up) Engliah Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2016/12/10  
  ISSN 1873-1716 (Electronic) 0167-5877 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes CAB (Commonwealth Agricultural Bureau) Abstracts, PubMed/MEDLINE Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1418 Serial 2877  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Aceto, H.; Miller, S.A.; Smith, G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Onset of diarrhea and pyrexia and time to detection of Salmonella enterica subsp enterica in feces in experimental studies of cattle, horses, goats, and sheep after infection per os Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association Abbreviated Journal J Am Vet Med Assoc  
  Volume 238 Issue 10 Pages 1333-1339  
  Keywords Animals; Diarrhea/microbiology/pathology/veterinary; Feces/microbiology; Fever/microbiology/pathology/veterinary; Salmonella Infections, Animal/microbiology/pathology; Salmonella enterica/physiology; Species Specificity; Cattle; Horses; Goats; Sheep  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To determine time to first detection of Salmonella organisms in feces of animals after experimental infection PO and times to onset of diarrhea and pyrexia to evaluate a common method for identifying nosocomial infections on the basis of time of admission and onset of clinical signs (ie, the 3-day criterion). DESIGN: Meta-analysis. SAMPLE POPULATION: Cattle, horses, goats, and sheep experimentally infected PO with Salmonella enterica subsp enterica. PROCEDURES: Online databases were searched for published reports describing results of experimental infection of cattle, horses, goats, and sheep PO with salmonellae. Time to detection of organisms in feces as well as to onset of diarrhea and pyrexia was noted. Analysis of covariance was used to examine relationships among these variables, host species and age, and Salmonella serovar and magnitude of infecting dose. RESULTS: Forty-three studies met the criteria for inclusion. Time to detection of salmonellae in feces ranged from 0.5 to 4 days. Times to onset of diarrhea and pyrexia ranged from 0.33 to 11 days and from 0.27 to 5 days, respectively. Time to onset of diarrhea was related to host age and Salmonella serovar. No other associations were identified. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Time to detection of salmonellae in feces is unreliable for identifying hospital-acquired infections; a 3-day criterion will misidentify hospital- versus community-acquired infections. Relying on clinical indices such as times to onset of diarrhea and pyrexia to trigger fecal sampling for detection of Salmonella infection will increase the risk of environmental contamination and nosocomial spread because animals may begin shedding organisms in feces several days prior.  
  Address Department of Clinical Studies, New Bolton Center, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Kennett Square, PA 19348, USA.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language (up) English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2011/05/17  
  ISSN 0003-1488 (Print) 0003-1488 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, MEDLINE, AGRICOLA, Biosis Previews and CAB Abstracts searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 607 Serial 2328  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Adell, A.D.; Miller, W.A.; Harvey, D.J.; Vanwormer, E.; Wuertz, S.; Conrad, P.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Individual subject meta-analysis of parameters for Cryptosporidium parvum shedding and diarrhoea in animal experimental models Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Epidemiology and Infection Abbreviated Journal Epidemiol Infect  
  Volume 141 Issue 8 Pages 1662-1678  
  Keywords Animals; Cryptosporidiosis/epidemiology; Cryptosporidiosis/parasitology; Cryptosporidium/physiology; Cryptosporidium parvum/physiology; Diarrhea/epidemiology; Diarrhea/parasitology; Disease Models, Animal; Feces/parasitology; Humans; Oocysts/physiology; Research Design/standards; Cattle; Pigs  
  Abstract SUMMARY Cryptosporidium is a zoonotic protozoan parasite with public health importance worldwide. The objectives of this study were to (1) conduct a meta-analysis of published literature for oocyst shedding and diarrhoea outcomes, and (2) develop recommendations for standardization of experimental dose-response studies. Results showed that for the outcome of oocyst shedding in faeces, the covariates 'experimental species', 'immunosuppression', 'oocyst dose' and 'oocyst dose' x 'age' were all significant (P 0.05). This study suggests that exposing mice, piglets, or ruminants, and using immunosuppressed experimental hosts, is more likely to result in oocyst shedding. For the outcome of diarrhoea in experimentally infected animal species, the key covariates 'experimental species', 'age' and 'immunosuppression' were significant (P 0.2). Therefore, based on the results of this meta-analysis, these variables should be carefully reported and considered when designing experimental dose-response studies. Additionally, detection of possible publication bias highlights the need to publish additional studies that convey statistically non-significant as well as significant results in the future.  
  Address Department of Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA, USA.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language (up) English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2012/10/17  
  ISSN 1469-4409 (Electronic) 0950-2688 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed and Web of Science searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 583 Serial 2329  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Adkin, A.; Hartnett, E.; Jordan, L.; Newell, D.; Davison, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Use of a systematic review to assist the development of Campylobacter control strategies in broilers Type Journal Article
  Year 2006 Publication Journal of Applied Microbiology Abbreviated Journal J Appl Microbiol  
  Volume 100 Issue 2 Pages 306-315  
  Keywords Animal Husbandry/methods; Animals; Campylobacter Infections/etiology/prevention & control/transmission; Chickens/microbiology; Food Microbiology; Housing, Animal; Poultry Diseases/prevention & control; Chickens  
  Abstract AIMS: Produce an evidence-based ranking of the major contributing factors and sources of Campylobacter occurrence in broilers produced in England, Scotland and Wales – Great Britain (GB). METHOD AND RESULTS: Relevant data were extracted from 159 research papers and findings were grouped into 14 sources of on-farm contamination and 37 contributing factors. A relevancy score was developed to take into account various measures from each study of applicability to GB broilers and strength of findings. Results indicate that major sources of Campylobacter include a depopulation event, another house on-farm, on-farm staff, and other animals on farm. The depopulation schedule (staggered slaughter) and multiple houses on-farm were identified as contributing factors associated with increasing the risk, and those decreasing the risk were use of a hygiene barrier, parent company and certain seasons of rearing. CONCLUSIONS: Although the review was more resource intensive compared to narrative studies, the system allows an increased level of transparency and the ability to investigate patterns and trends. SIGNIFICANCE AND IMPACT OF THE STUDY: This paper provides the first evidence-based ranking of the major sources and contributing factors for Campylobacter presence in broilers in GB using a systematic review.  
  Address Veterinary Laboratories Agency, Weybridge, UK. a.adkin@vla.defra.gsi.gov.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language (up) English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2006/01/25  
  ISSN 1364-5072 (Print) 1364-5072 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes CAB Abstracts, MEDLINE, VetCD, Web of Science, ISI Proceedings, ScienceDirect and Google searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 609 Serial 2330  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Aerni, V.; Brinkhof, M.W.G.; Wechsler, B.; Oester, H.; Frohlich, E. url  openurl
  Title Productivity and mortality of laying hens in aviaries: a systematic review Type Journal Article
  Year 2005 Publication World's Poultry Science Journal Abbreviated Journal World Poultry Sci J  
  Volume 61 Issue 1 Pages 130-142, 146, 150, 154, 159, 163  
  Keywords Egg Producing Animals [LL130]; Animal Husbandry and Production [LL180]; Animal Physiology and Biochemistry (Excluding Nutrition) [LL600]; Eggs and Egg Products [QQ040]; Food Composition and Quality [QQ500]; animal housing; aviaries; beak; cages; cannibalism; egg mass; egg weight; feed conversion efficiency; feed intake; hens; laying performance; mortality; poultry; productivity; reviews; strain differences; fowls; Gallus gallus; Gallus; Phasianidae; Galliformes; birds; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; eukaryotes; chickens; death rate; domesticated birds; laying characters; [Indexed using CAB Thesaurus terms]  
  Abstract A systematic review of investigations on productivity, mortality and cannibalism of laying hens housed in aviaries is presented. In Part One we reviewed the studies that compared these parameters between laying hens housed in aviaries and in conventional cages. In Part Two we investigated the relative impact of strain, beak trimming and rearing condition on productivity and mortality in aviaries. The comparative analysis revealed that aviary hens consumed 3.0% more food than caged hens, and food conversion was 6.7% higher in aviaries than in cages. On the other hand, the mortality rate and cannibalism rate did not differ significantly between the two housing systems. The analysis of causes of variation in productivity, mortality rate and cannibalism rate in aviaries revealed a strong effect of strain. Beak trimming was associated with a reduced prevalence of cannibalism rates but had no effect on overall mortality. It also reduced egg weight and food consumption. Early access to litter during the rearing period had a positive effect on egg weight; egg mass, food conversion and mortality rate. In conclusion, we found a slightly reduced productivity of aviaries in relation to cages although the mortality rates and the prevalence of cannibalism did not differ between these housing systems. To further improve productivity and reduce mortality of hens housed in aviaries we recommend the choice of suitable strains and the implementation of improved rearing conditions including early access to litter.  
  Address Bachlerenweg 20, CH-3044 Sariswil, Switzerland. vera.aerni@bluewin.ch  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language (up) English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0043-9339 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Web of Science searched. Database record copyright CAB International 2010 Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 285 Serial 2331  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Aghajafari, F.; Murphy, K.; Matthews, S.; Ohlsson, A.; Amankwah, K.; Hannah, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Repeated doses of antenatal corticosteroids in animals: a systematic review Type Journal Article
  Year 2002 Publication American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology Abbreviated Journal Am J Obstet Gynecol  
  Volume 186 Issue 4 Pages 843-849  
  Keywords Adrenal Cortex Hormones/administration & dosage/adverse effects; Animals; Behavior, Animal/drug effects; Betamethasone/administration & dosage/adverse effects; Birth Weight; Embryonic and Fetal Development/drug effects; Female; Fetal Growth Retardation/chemically induced; Fetal Organ Maturity; Haplorhini; Lung/embryology; Medline; Male; Mice; Placebos; Pregnancy; Rabbits; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Sheep  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this review was to assess the effects of repeated doses of antenatal corticosteroids on lung and brain function and on growth restriction in animals. STUDY DESIGN: MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched for randomized controlled trials that compared repeated doses of antenatal corticosteroids versus a single dose, with or without placebo, in pregnant animals. RESULTS: Nineteen studies were included. The animals that were studied included sheep, monkeys, rabbits, and mice. There were 8 studies that assessed the effects of repeated doses of antenatal corticosteroids on lung function. All the studies reported improvement in lung function after repeated doses of antenatal corticosteroids. Seven studies investigated the effects of repeated doses of antenatal corticosteroids on brain or nervous system function or growth; all the studies found adverse effects with repeated doses of antenatal corticosteroids. Eleven studies looked at the effect of repeated doses of antenatal corticosteroids on fetal growth. Nine studies found evidence of fetal growth restriction with repeated doses of antenatal corticosteroids. One study assessed long-term behavioral outcomes in mice and found no effect. CONCLUSION: Evidence from randomized controlled trials in animals suggests that repeated doses of antenatal corticosteroids may have beneficial effects in terms of lung function but may have adverse effects on brain function and fetal growth. Because of the differences between animals and humans, it is difficult to extrapolate directly the results of these studies to humans. Therefore, randomized controlled trials in humans are needed to assess the effects of repeated courses of antenatal corticosteroids for pregnant women who are at increased risk of preterm birth in terms of important perinatal, neonatal, and maternal outcomes.  
  Address Institute of Medical Sciences, Maternal, Infant and Reproductive Health Research Unit, Center for Research in Women's Health, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Center, University of Toronto, Ontario.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language (up) English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2002/04/23  
  ISSN 0002-9378 (Print) 0002-9378 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes MEDLINE and Embase searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 503 Serial 2332  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Akhtar, A.Z.; Pippin, J.J.; Sandusky, C.B. url  openurl
  Title Animal studies in spinal cord injury: a systematic review of methylprednisolone Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication Alternatives to Laboratory Animals : ATLA Abbreviated Journal Altern Lab Anim  
  Volume 37 Issue 1 Pages 43-62  
  Keywords Animals; Cats; Disease Models, Animal; Dogs; Haplorhini; Humans; Methylprednisolone/ therapeutic use; Mice; Neuroprotective Agents/ therapeutic use; Predictive Value of Tests; Rabbits; Rats; Recovery of Function; Sheep; Species Specificity; Spinal Cord Injuries/ drug therapy/physiopathology  
  Abstract The objective of this study was to examine whether animal studies can reliably be used to determine the usefulness of methylprednisolone (MP) and other treatments for acute spinal cord injury (SCI) in humans. This was achieved by performing a systematic review of animal studies on the effects of MP administration on the functional outcome of acute SCI. Data were extracted from the published articles relating to: outcome; MP dosing regimen; species/strain; number of animals; methodological quality; type of injury induction; use of anaesthesia; functional scale used; and duration of follow-up. Subgroup analyses were performed, based on species or strain, injury method, MP dosing regimen, functional outcome measured, and methodological quality. Sixty-two studies were included, which involved a wide variety of animal species and strains. Overall, beneficial effects of MP administration were obtained in 34% of the studies, no effects in 58%, and mixed results in 8%. The results were inconsistent both among and within species, even when attempts were made to detect any patterns in the results through subgroup analyses. The results of this study demonstrate the barriers to the accurate prediction from animal studies of the effectiveness of MP in the treatment of acute SCI in humans. This underscores the need for the development and implementation of validated testing methods.  
  Address Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, Washington, DC, USA. aysha.akhtar@oxfordanimalethics.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language (up) English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2009/03/19  
  ISSN 0261-1929 (Print) 0261-1929 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 611 Serial 2333  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Allen, K.J.; Christley, R.M.; Birchall, M.A.; Franklin, S.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A systematic review of the efficacy of interventions for dynamic intermittent dorsal displacement of the soft palate Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Equine Veterinary Journal Abbreviated Journal Equine Vet J  
  Volume 44 Issue 3 Pages 259-266  
  Keywords Airway Obstruction/etiology/therapy/veterinary; Animals; Evidence-Based Practice/standards; Horse Diseases/diagnosis/etiology/therapy; Horses; Palate, Soft/pathology/physiopathology; Quality Assurance, Health Care; Research/standards; Treatment Outcome  
  Abstract There are numerous treatments for correction of dorsal displacement of the soft palate (DDSP). However, the efficacy of these treatments is controversial and there is little consensus on how best to treat this condition. The aims of this study were to systematically review the literature and to assess the evidence on the clinical effects of interventions for dynamic intermittent DDSP. A secondary objective was to assess whether factors relating to study quality affected reported success rates. Twenty-three studies were included, covering a wide number of interventions but also differing widely is terms of study design, sample size, method of diagnosis, outcome measure and the number lost to follow-up. The assessment of adverse effects was severely limited because of lack of reporting. The way in which success is measured appears to have a great effect on the reported results. Research synthesis has been severely limited because of the heterogeneity in the included studies. The low level of evidence makes it difficult to draw firm conclusions as to the efficacy of procedures for DDSP. Hence it is currently not possible to determine which procedure is the most appropriate. This systematic review highlights the difficulties of studying palatal dysfunction and suggests areas where improvements can be made in future studies.  
  Address Department of Clinical Veterinary Science, University of Bristol, UK. kate.allen@bristol.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language (up) English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2011/09/02  
  ISSN 2042-3306 (Electronic) 0425-1644 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes MEDLINE, PUBMED, ISI Web of Science, CAB Abstracts, Embase and IVIS searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 612 Serial 2334  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Andretta, I.; Kipper, M.; Lehnen, C.R.; Hauschild, L.; Vale, M.M.; Lovatto, P.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Meta-analytical study of productive and nutritional interactions of mycotoxins in growing pigs Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Animal : an International Journal of Animal Bioscience Abbreviated Journal Animal  
  Volume 6 Issue 9 Pages 1476-1482  
  Keywords Age Factors; Animal Feed/analysis/microbiology; Animal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena; Animals; Feeding Behavior/drug effects; Female; Food Contamination; Male; Mycotoxins/metabolism/toxicity; Organ Size/drug effects; Sex Factors; Swine/growth & development/microbiology/physiology; Weight Gain/drug effects; Pigs; Swine  
  Abstract A meta-analysis was carried out in order to study the association of mycotoxins with performance and organ weights in growing pigs. A total of 85 articles published between 1968 and 2010 were used, totaling 1012 treatments and 13 196 animals. The meta-analysis followed three sequential analyses: graphical, correlation and variance-covariance. The presence of mycotoxins in diets was seen to reduce the feed intake by 18% and the weight gain in 21% compared with the control group. Deoxynivalenol and aflatoxins were the mycotoxins with the greatest impact on the feed intake and growth of pigs, reducing by 26% and 16% in the feed intake and by 26% and 22% in the weight gain. The mycotoxin concentration in diets and the animal age at challenge were the variables that more improved the coefficient of determination in equations for estimating the effect of mycotoxins on weight gain. The mycotoxin effect on growth proved to be greater in younger animals. In addition, the residual analysis showed that the greater part of the variation in weight gain was explained by the variation in feed intake (87%). The protein and methionine levels in diets could influence the feed intake and the weight gain in challenged animals. The weight gain in challenged pigs showed a positive correlation with the methionine level in diets (0.68). The mycotoxin effect on growth was greater in males compared with the effect on females. The reduction in weight gain was of 15% in the female group and 19% in the male group. Mycotoxin presence in pig diets has interfered in the relative weight of the liver, the kidneys and the heart. Mycotoxins have an influence on performance and organ weight in pigs. However, the magnitude of the effects varies with the type and concentration of mycotoxin, sex and the animal age, as well as nutritional factors.  
  Address Grupo de Modelagem Animal, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria, RS 97105-900, Brazil. iandretta@gmail.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language (up) English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2012/10/04  
  ISSN 1751-732X (Electronic) 1751-7311 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Google Scholar, HighWire, ScienceDirect Scopus, Scielo and PubMed searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 862 Serial 2335  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Appuhamy, J.A.; Strathe, A.B.; Jayasundara, S.; Wagner-Riddle, C.; Dijkstra, J.; France, J.; Kebreab, E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Anti-methanogenic effects of monensin in dairy and beef cattle: A meta-analysis Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Journal of Dairy Science Abbreviated Journal J Dairy Sci  
  Volume 96 Issue 8 Pages 5161-5173  
  Keywords Animals; Cattle/metabolism; Female; Male; Methane/antagonists & inhibitors; Methane/biosynthesis; Monensin/pharmacology; Monensin; Methane; Cattle  
  Abstract Monensin is a widely used feed additive with the potential to minimize methane (CH4) emissions from cattle. Several studies have investigated the effects of monensin on CH4, but findings have been inconsistent. The objective of the present study was to conduct meta-analyses to quantitatively summarize the effect of monensin on CH4 production (g/d) and the percentage of dietary gross energy lost as CH4 (Ym) in dairy cows and beef steers. Data from 22 controlled studies were used. Heterogeneity of the monensin effects were estimated using random effect models. Due to significant heterogeneity (>68%) in both dairy and beef studies, the random effect models were then extended to mixed effect models by including fixed effects of DMI, dietary nutrient contents, monensin dose, and length of monensin treatment period. Monensin reduced Ym from 5.97 to 5.43% and diets with greater neutral detergent fiber contents (g/kg of dry matter) tended to enhance the monensin effect on CH4 in beef steers. When adjusted for the neutral detergent fiber effect, monensin supplementation [average 32 mg/kg of dry matter intake (DMI)] reduced CH4 emissions from beef steers by 19 +/- 4 g/d. Dietary ether extract content and DMI had a positive and a negative effect on monensin in dairy cows, respectively. When adjusted for these 2 effects in the final mixed-effect model, monensin feeding (average 21 mg/kg of DMI) was associated with a 6 +/- 3 g/d reduction in CH4 emissions in dairy cows. When analyzed across dairy and beef cattle studies, DMI or monensin dose (mg/kg of DMI) tended to decrease or increase the effect of monensin in reducing methane emissions, respectively. Methane mitigation effects of monensin in dairy cows (-12 +/- 6 g/d) and beef steers (-14 +/- 6 g/d) became similar when adjusted for the monensin dose differences between dairy cow and beef steer studies. When adjusted for DMI differences, monensin reduced Ym in dairy cows (-0.23 +/- 0.14) and beef steers (-0.33 +/- 0.16). Monensin treatment period length did not significantly modify the monensin effects in dairy cow or beef steer studies. Overall, monensin had stronger antimethanogenic effects in beef steers than dairy cows, but the effects in dairy cows could potentially be improved by dietary composition modifications and increasing the monensin dose.  
  Address Department of Animal Science, University of California, Davis 95616. Electronic address: ranga.appuhamy@gmail.com.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language (up) English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2013/06/19  
  ISSN 1525-3198 (Electronic) 0022-0302 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Web of Science and CAB Direct (CAB Abstracts?) searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1114 Serial 2336  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Aragon, C.L.; Budsberg, S.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Applications of evidence-based medicine: cranial cruciate ligament injury repair in the dog Type Journal Article
  Year 2005 Publication Veterinary Surgery : VS Abbreviated Journal Vet Surg  
  Volume 34 Issue 2 Pages 93-98  
  Keywords Animals; Anterior Cruciate Ligament/injuries/surgery; Dogs/injuries/surgery; Evidence-Based Medicine; Lameness, Animal/surgery; Retrospective Studies; Stifle/injuries; Surgical Procedures, Operative/methods/veterinary; Treatment Outcome; Dogs  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the literature reporting surgical interventions pertaining to canine cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) injury using an evidence-based medicine paradigm. STUDY DESIGN: Systematic literature review. METHODS: An on-line bibliographic search through Medline, PubMed, Veterinary Information Network, and Commonwealth Agricultural Bureau Abstracts was performed during August 2004. Two hundred and forty resources of information were identified. Studies were compared and evaluated with regard to study design (retrospective, prospective, randomization), surgical technique, short- and long-term follow-up, and evidence classification. RESULTS: Twenty-eight resources qualified to assist with evidence classification. No class I or class II studies were present, 5 studies were categorized as a class III and 23 studies were categorized as a class IV. Seventeen studies were retrospectively designed and 11 studies were prospectively designed. Proposed results ranged from a wide variety of subjective findings including clinical impression, radiographic analysis, synovial fluid analysis, gross pathology, and histopathology. Objective results, although infrequent, included force plate analysis and cadaveric biomechanical testing. CONCLUSIONS: At this time, the application of evidence-based medicine in analyzing the current available evidence suggests that there is not a single surgical procedure that has enough data to recommend that it can consistently return dogs to normal function after CCL injury. The requirement for assessing and categorizing the available evidence becomes increasingly important as more data becomes available and the quality of research improves. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: An evidence-based medicine paradigm did not provide sufficient evidence favoring 1 surgical technique for management of canine CCL injury.  
  Address Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602-7390, USA. aragon8@msn.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language (up) English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2005/04/30  
  ISSN 0161-3499 (Print) 0161-3499 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes MEDLINE, PubMed, VIN and CAB Abstracts searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 613 Serial 2337  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Aragon, C.L.; Hofmeister, E.H.; Budsberg, S.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Systematic review of clinical trials of treatments for osteoarthritis in dogs Type Journal Article
  Year 2007 Publication Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association Abbreviated Journal J Am Vet Med Assoc  
  Volume 230 Issue 4 Pages 514-521  
  Keywords Animals; Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/therapeutic use; Chondroitin/therapeutic use; Clinical Trials as Topic; Dog Diseases/drug therapy/pathology; Dogs; Evidence-Based Medicine; Glucosamine/therapeutic use; Osteoarthritis/drug therapy/pathology/veterinary; Severity of Illness Index; Thiazines/therapeutic use; Thiazoles/therapeutic use; Treatment Outcome  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To identify and critically evaluate the quality of evidence of the most commonly used pharmacologic, nutraceutical, and purported slow-acting drugs of osteoarthritis for the management of osteoarthritis in dogs by use of the FDA's evidence-based medicine scoring system. DESIGN: Systematic review. SAMPLE POPULATION: 16 clinical trials. PROCEDURES: A broad bibliographic search was performed prior to May 2006. Inclusion criteria focused on prospective trials evaluating commonly used medical treatment interventions for the management of osteoarthritis in dogs and published in peer-reviewed journals. The analysis consisted of the following: study design rating, quality factor rating, quantity rating, consistency rating, relevance to disease risk reduction rating, and cumulative strength of evidence ranking. RESULTS: 4 trials evaluating meloxicam were rated as type I. Three trials evaluating carprofen were rated as type I, and 2 trials were rated as type III. One trial evaluating each of the following agents was rated as type 1: etodolac; P54FP; polysulfated glycosaminoglycan; and a combination of chondroitin sulfate, glucosamine hydrochloride, and manganese ascorbate. Two trials evaluating pentosan polysulphate and 2 trails evaluating green-lipped mussels were rated as type I. One trial evaluating hyaluronan was rated as type III. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: A high level of comfort exists for meloxicam that the claimed relationship is scientifically valid and that its use is clinically efficacious for the treatment of osteoarthritis in dogs. A moderate level of comfort exists for carprofen; etodolac; pentosan polysulphate; green-lipped mussels; P54FP; polysulfated glycosaminoglycans; and a combination of chondroitin sulfate, glucosamine hydrochloride, and manganese ascorbate. An extremely low level of comfort exists for hyaluronan.  
  Address Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language (up) English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2007/02/17  
  ISSN 0003-1488 (Print) 0003-1488 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes CAB Abstracts, MEDLINE, PubMed and VIN searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 614 Serial 2338  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Arnott, G.; Roberts, D.; Rooke, J.A.; Turner, S.P.; Lawrence, A.B.; Rutherford, K.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Board invited review: The importance of the gestation period for welfare of calves: maternal stressors and difficult births Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Journal of Animal Science Abbreviated Journal J Anim Sci  
  Volume 90 Issue 13 Pages 5021-5034  
  Keywords Animal Welfare; Animals; Animals, Newborn/physiology; Cattle/physiology; Female; Male; Parturition; Pregnancy; Stress, Physiological; Cattle  
  Abstract The prenatal period is of critical importance in defining how individuals respond to their environment throughout life. Stress experienced by pregnant females has been shown to have detrimental effects on offspring biology in humans and a variety of other species. It also is becoming increasingly apparent that prenatal events can have important consequences for the behavior, health, and productivity of offspring in farmed species. Pregnant cattle may experience many potentially important stressors, for instance, relating to their social environment, housing system and physical environment, interactions with humans and husbandry procedures, and their state of health. We examined the available literature to provide a review of the implications of prenatal stress for offspring welfare in cattle. The long-term effects of dystocia on cattle offspring also are reviewed. To ensure a transparent and repeatable selection process, a systematic review approach was adopted. The research literature clearly demonstrates that prenatal stress and difficult births in beef and dairy cattle both have implications for offspring welfare and performance. Common husbandry practices, such as transport, were shown to influence offspring biology and the importance of environmental variables, including thermal stress and drought, also were highlighted. Maternal disease during pregnancy was shown to negatively impact offspring welfare. Moreover, dystocia-affected calves suffer increased mortality and morbidity, decreased transfer of passive immunity, and important physiological and behavioral changes. This review also identified considerable gaps in our knowledge and understanding of the effects of prenatal stress in cattle.  
  Address Animal Behaviour and Welfare, Animal and Veterinary Sciences, Research Group, SRUC, West Mains Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JG, UK. gareth.arnott@sruc.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language (up) English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2012/09/07  
  ISSN 1525-3163 (Electronic) 0021-8812 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Web of Science, MEDLINE and BIOSIS Previews searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1131 Serial 2340  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Aspirin, G.M.; Gordon-Evans, W.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title What is the evidence? Intervertebral disk disease Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association Abbreviated Journal J Am Vet Med Assoc  
  Volume 237 Issue 10 Pages 1151-1152  
  Keywords Animals; Dog Diseases/diagnosis/surgery; Dogs; Evidence-Based Practice; Female; Intervertebral Disc Degeneration/diagnosis/surgery/veterinary; Magnetic Resonance Imaging/veterinary; Myelography/veterinary; Spinal Cord Compression/diagnosis/surgery/veterinary; Tomography, X-Ray Computed/veterinary  
  Abstract  
  Address Department of Veterinary Clinical Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61802, USA. geraldineaspirin@gmail.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language (up) English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2010/11/16  
  ISSN 0003-1488 (Print) 0003-1488 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 432 Serial 2341  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Averos, X.; Brossard, L.; Dourmad, J.Y.; de Greef, K.H.; Edwards, S.A.; Meunier-Salaun, M.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Meta-analysis on the effects of the physical environment, animal traits, feeder and feed characteristics on the feeding behaviour and performance of growing-finishing pigs Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Animal : an International Journal of Animal Bioscience Abbreviated Journal Animal  
  Volume 6 Issue 8 Pages 1275-1289  
  Keywords Animal Feed/analysis; Animals; Body Weight; Feeding Behavior/physiology; Feeding Methods/instrumentation; Female; Housing, Animal; Male; Models, Biological; Regression Analysis; Sex Factors; Species Specificity; Sus scrofa/growth & development; Temperature; Time Factors; Pigs; Swine  
  Abstract A meta-analysis, using information from 45 experiments on growing-finishing pigs published in 39 manuscripts, was carried out to determine the simultaneous effects of the physical environment (space allowance, group size, flooring conditions, temperature, presence of enrichment), pig traits (initial body weight (BW) for each studied time interval, sex, genetics), feeder characteristics (water provision within the feeder, feeder design (individual/collective), feeder places/pig, presence of feeder protection) and feed characteristics (feed allowance (ad libitum/restricted), net energy content, crude protein (CP) content), as well as their potential interactions, on the feeding behaviour and performance of growing-finishing pigs. The detrimental effect of low temperature on performance was particularly evident for restricted-fed pigs (P < 0.05). At reduced feeder space allowance, a reduction in the percentage of time spent eating was predicted when increasing initial BW, whereas the opposite was predicted for larger feeder space allowances (P < 0.001). The reduction in visit duration to the feeder in higher BW groups became gradually more important with increasing feeder space allowance (P < 0.01), whereas the increase in the ingestion rate and average daily feed intake (ADFI) with increasing initial BW became smaller with increasing feeder space (P < 0.05). The model predicted a reduction in feed conversion ratio (FCR) with increasing group size (P < 0.05) and floor space allowance (P < 0.01) and on solid floors with or without bedding (P < 0.05). In comparison with other feeders, wet/dry feeders were associated with more frequent but shorter feeder visits (P < 0.05), higher ingestion rates (P < 0.001) and higher ADFI (P < 0.10). The use of protection within individual feeders increased the time spent feeding (P < 0.001), reduced the number of visits per day (P < 0.01), the ingestion rate (P < 0.001) and FCR (P < 0.01) in comparison with other feeder types. Sex modulated the effect of the number of feeder places/pig on FCR (P < 0.05), with a gradual reduction of FCR in entire males and females when increasing feeder space allowance. Genetics tended to modulate the effect of diets' CP content on FCR (P < 0.10). Overall, these results may contribute to the improvement of the welfare and performance of growing-finishing pigs by a better knowledge of the influence of the rearing environment and may help optimize the feeding strategies in current production systems.  
  Address INRA, UMR1079 Systemes d'Elevage Nutrition Animale et Humaine, F-35590 Saint-Gilles, France.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language (up) English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2012/12/12  
  ISSN 1751-732X (Electronic) 1751-7311 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Web of Knowledge (Web of Science?) searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 860 Serial 2342  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Averos, X.; Brossard, L.; Dourmad, J.Y.; Greef, K.H. de; Edge, H.L.; Edwards, S.A.; Meunier-Salaun, M.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A meta-analysis of the combined effect of housing and environmental enrichment characteristics on the behaviour and performance of pigs Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication Applied Animal Behaviour Science Abbreviated Journal Appl Anim Behav Sci  
  Volume 127 Issue 3/4 Pages 73-85  
  Keywords Animal Behaviour [LL300]; Meat Producing Animals [LL120]; analysis; animal behaviour; animal housing; determination; effects; enrichment; estimation; group size; models; productivity; social behaviour; pigs; Sus scrofa; Sus; Suidae; Suiformes; Artiodactyla; mammals; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; ungulates; eukaryotes; animal behavior; behavior; hogs; social behavior; swine; [Indexed using CAB Thesaurus terms]  
  Abstract To quantify the combined effect of housing conditions and environmental enrichment on the behaviour and performance of pigs, a meta-analysis was performed using information from 45 experiments in 42 published manuscripts. Multiple regression models were applied to evaluate the effects of space allowance per pig (k-value; m2/BW0.667), group size (n), floor characteristics (solid, partly, or totally slatted floor), bedding (presence or absence), and the number and presentation sequence of point-source objects (no object, one object, two simultaneous objects, two alternated objects, three or more simultaneous objects or three or more alternated objects) on the general activity, enrichment and object-directed exploratory behaviour, social behaviour, and productive performance. A non-linear relationship between space allowance per pig and time spent sitting and lying was found (P<0.10 and P<0.01 for the k-value and its quadratic term respectively). Total time spent in exploration increased with space allowance per pig when bedding was present (P<0.01), and time spent exploring other pen items decreased with increasing space allowance per pig if no bedding was provided (P<0.001). Total time spent in exploration increased with group size (P<0.001). The lowest predicted total exploration time (least squares mean+or-standard error) was found in the absence of bedding and point-source objects (13+or-3%; P<0.05), and the highest when bedding (18+or-3%) or point-source objects (19+or-3%) were present. Time exploring point-source objects was higher when different objects were provided (P<0.001). Suspended (P<0.05) and deformable (P<0.05) enrichment items increased the time spent manipulating them. Time spent exploring point-source objects was predicted to be higher in the absence of slats and bedding (32+or-6%; P<0.05), and lower when bedding (8+or-9%) or slats (12+or-4%) were present. Time engaged in negative social behaviours decreased in the presence of point-source objects (P<0.01), and increased with group size in the absence of bedding (P<0.001). Time engaged in positive social behaviours tended to decrease in the presence of point-source objects (P<0.10), and when space allowance per pig increased in the absence of bedding (P<0.10). Slight trends towards lower FCR were predicted when point-source objects (P<0.10) and bedding (P=0.10) were present. This information can be utilised in the determination of the general effects of production systems on the welfare of pigs as well as in the development of new production systems.  
  Address INRA, UMR1079 Systemes d'Elevage Nutrition Animale et Humaine, F-35590 Saint-Gilles, France. Xavier.Averos@rennes.inra.fr  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language (up) English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0168-1591 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Web of Knowledge (Web of Science?) searched. Database record copyright CAB International 2010 Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 289 Serial 2343  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Averos, X.; Brossard, L.; Dourmad, J.Y.; Greef, K.H. de; Edge, H.L.; Edwards, S.A.; Meunier-Salaun, M.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Quantitative assessment of the effects of space allowance, group size and floor characteristics on the lying behaviour of growing-finishing pigs Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication Animal : an International Journal of Animal Bioscience Abbreviated Journal Animal  
  Volume 4 Issue 5 Pages 777-783  
  Keywords Animal Welfare [LL810]; Information and Documentation [CC300]; Meat Producing Animals [LL120]; animal housing; animal welfare; body weight; effects; floors; group size; interactions; models; publications; research; slatted floors; space requirements; temperature; pigs; Sus scrofa; Sus; Suidae; Suiformes; Artiodactyla; mammals; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; ungulates; eukaryotes; animal rights; flooring; hogs; scientific publications; studies; swine; [Indexed using CAB Thesaurus terms]  
  Abstract To obtain quantitative information that can be later used in animal welfare modelling, the relationship between the lying behaviour of growing-finishing pigs (initial body weight (BW) between 19 and 87 kg) and different factors related to the housing conditions, with a potential negative effect on their welfare, was studied by means of a meta-analytical approach. Data from 22 experiments reported in 21 scientific publications were collected. The space allowance, expressed on an allometric basis by means of a k-value (m2/BW0.667), the group size (n) and the floor characteristics (fully and partly slatted v. non-slatted floor), as well as their significant two-way interactions were used as fixed effects, and the experiment was used as a random factor to take into account the interexperiment effect. Further regression analyses were performed on the predicted values of observations in order to improve the adjustment of data. A significant quadratic relationship was established between space allowance (k-value, P<0.05; squared k-value, P<0.01) and the percentage of time spent lying. A significant interaction between the k-value and the floor type was also found (P<0.05), showing that the relationship between space allowance and lying behaviour is affected by the presence or absence of slats. Threshold k-values were obtained using broken-line analyses, being about 0.039 for slatted floors and almost double for non-slatted floors. Compared to other studies, these values suggest that the ability to rest as space availability decreases may be compromised before a reduced performance becomes apparent. Group size did not show a significant effect. Additional information should be added to the model, as further data become available, to adjust the proposed parameters as well as to try to include the effect of other important aspects such as that of ambient temperature.  
  Address INRA, UMR1079 Systemes d'Elevage Nutrition Animale et Humaine, F-35590 Saint-Gilles, France. Ludovic.Brossard@rennes.inra.fr  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language (up) English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1751-7311 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Web of Knowledge (Web of Science?) searched. Database record copyright CAB International 2010 Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 290 Serial 2344  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print

Save Citations:
Export Records: