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Author Duffield, T.F.; Rabiee, A.R.; Lean, I.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A meta-analysis of the impact of monensin in lactating dairy cattle. Part 1. Metabolic effects Type Journal Article
  Year 2008 Publication Journal of Dairy Science Abbreviated Journal J Dairy Sci  
  Volume 91 Issue 4 Pages 1334-1346  
  Keywords (up) 3-Hydroxybutyric Acid/blood; Animal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena; Animals; Blood Glucose/analysis/drug effects; Cattle/blood/metabolism; Dairying; Fatty Acids, Nonesterified/blood; Female; Ionophores/pharmacology; Monensin/pharmacology; Cattle  
  Abstract A meta-analysis of the impact of monensin on metabolism of dairy cattle was conducted following a search of the literature. A total of 59 studies with monensin feeding in dairy cattle were identified in which 30 papers and 45 trials contained metabolic data. The beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHBA) data were obtained from over 4,000 cows and 115 trial sites. Data for each trial were extracted and analyzed using meta-analysis software in Stata. Estimated effect sizes of monensin were calculated on blood concentrations of BHBA, acetoacetate, nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA), glucose, cholesterol, urea, calcium, insulin, and milk urea. Monensin use in lactating dairy cattle significantly reduced blood concentrations of BHBA 13%, acetoacetate 14%, and NEFA 7%. Monensin increased glucose 3% and urea 6%. Monensin had no significant effect on cholesterol, calcium, milk urea, or insulin. Heterogeneity was significant for BHBA and cholesterol [I(2) (measure of variation beyond chance) = 37 and 54%, respectively]; therefore, random effects models were used for those analytes. Publication bias existed with the monensin effect on BHBA, with a tendency for studies to be published if there was a significant reduction in this ketone. Meta-regression analysis of the effect sizes obtained from the metabolic data showed that method of delivery, timing of administration, stage of lactation, and diet were influential in modifying effect size of monensin treatment. Use of top dress or delivery via a controlled release capsule reduced the magnitude of effect on BHBA (coefficient +0.353); however, top dress use compared with controlled release capsule or total mixed ration enhanced the monensin effect on glucose (coefficient +0.296). There was a greater impact with monensin on reducing BHBA in early lactation (coefficient -0.151) and in pasture-based trials (coefficient -0.194). Use of monensin in both the pre- and postcalving periods was associated with an enhanced impact on NEFA (coefficient -0.254). Monensin had less impact on serum glucose in the pre-calving time period (coefficient -0.237). These findings demonstrate an improvement in the energy metabolism of dairy cows supplemented with monensin.  
  Address Department of Population Medicine, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, N1G 2W1 Canada. tduffiel@uoguelph.ca  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2008/03/20  
  ISSN 1525-3198 (Electronic) 0022-0302 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, AGRICOLA, CAB (Abstracts?) and Google Scholar searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 657 Serial 2403  
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Author Bougouin, A.; Appuhamy, J.A.; Kebreab, E.; Dijkstra, J.; Kwakkel, R.P.; France, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of phytase supplementation on phosphorus retention in broilers and layers: A meta-analysis Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Poultry Science Abbreviated Journal Poult Sci  
  Volume 93 Issue 8 Pages 1981-92  
  Keywords (up) 6-Phytase; Animal Feed/analysis; Animals; Calcium, Dietary/metabolism; Chickens/metabolism; Diet/veterinary; Dietary Supplements; Models, Biological; Phosphorus/metabolism; Calcium, Dietary; Phosphorus; 6-Phytase; Chickens; Poultry  
  Abstract Phytase, a widely used feed additive in poultry diets, increases P availability and subsequently reduces inorganic-P supplementation and P-excretion. Phytase supplementation effect on P-retention in poultry has been investigated, but the effect sizes were highly variable. The present study's objective was to conduct several meta-analyses to quantitatively summarize the phytase effect on P-retention in broilers and layers. Data from 103 and 26 controlled experiments testing the phytase effect on P-retention were included in 2 separate meta-analyses for broilers and layers, respectively. The mean difference calculated by subtracting the means of P-retention for the control group from the phytase-supplemented group was chosen as an effect size estimate. Between-study variability (heterogeneity) of mean difference was estimated using random-effect models and had a significant effect (P < 0.01) in both broilers and layers. Therefore, random-effect models were extended to mixed-effect models to explain heterogeneity and obtain final phytase effect size estimates. Available dietary and bird variables were included as fixed effects in the mixed-effect models. The final broiler mixed-effect model included phytase dose and Ca-to-total-P ratio (Ca:tP), explaining 15.6% of the heterogeneity. Other variables such as breed might further explain between-study variance. Broilers consuming control diets were associated with 48.4% P-retention. Exogenous phytase supplementation at 1,039 FTU/kg of diet increased P-retention by 8.6 percentage units on average. A unit increase of phytase dose and Ca:tP from their means further increased P-retention. For layers, the final mixed-effect models included dietary Ca, age, and experimental period length. The variables explained 65.9% of the heterogeneity. Layers receiving exogenous phytase at 371 FTU/kg were associated with a 5.02 percentage unit increase in P-retention. A unit increase in dietary Ca from its mean increased P-retention, whereas an increase in the experiment length and layer's age decreased P-retention. Phytase supplementation had a significant positive effect on P-retention in both broilers and layers, but effect sizes across studies were significantly heterogeneous due to differences in Ca contents, experiment length, bird age, and phytase dose.  
  Address Animal Nutrition Group, Wageningen University, Wageningen, PO Box 338, 6700 AH, the Netherlands Department of Animal Science, University of California, Davis 95616 ad.bougouin@gmail.com. Department of Animal Science, University of California, Davis 95616. Animal Nutrition Group, Wageningen University, Wageningen, PO Box 338, 6700 AH, the Netherlands. Centre for Nutrition Modelling, Department of Animal and Poultry Science, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, N1G 2W1, Canada.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2014/06/07  
  ISSN 0032-5791 (Print) 0032-5791 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Science Direct, CAB Direct (CAB Abstracts?) and Poultry Science journal website searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1237 Serial 2726  
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Author Brelsford, V.L.; Meints, K.; Gee, N.R.; Pfeffer, K. doi  openurl
  Title Animal-Assisted Interventions in the Classroom-A Systematic Review Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication International Journal of Environmental Reseasrch and Public Health Abbreviated Journal Int J Environ Res Public Health  
  Volume 14 Issue 7 Pages  
  Keywords (up) AAT; Animal-assisted intervention; Animal-assisted Therapy; Children; Classroom; Dogs; School  
  Abstract The inclusion of animals in educational practice is becoming increasingly popular, but it is unclear how solid the evidence for this type of intervention is. The aim of this systematic review is to scrutinise the empirical research literature relating to animal-assisted interventions conducted in educational settings. The review included 25 papers; 21 from peer-reviewed journals and 4 obtained using grey literature databases. Most studies reported significant benefits of animal-assisted interventions in the school setting. Despite this, studies vary greatly in methods and design, in intervention types, measures, and sample sizes, and in the length of time exposed to an animal. Furthermore, a worrying lack of reference to risk assessment and animal welfare must be highlighted. Taken together, the results of this review show promising findings and emerging evidence suggestive of potential benefits related to animals in school settings. The review also indicates the need for a larger and more robust evidence base driven by thorough and strict protocols. The review further emphasises the need for safeguarding for all involved-welfare and safety are paramount.  
  Address School of Psychology, University of Lincoln, Brayford Pool, Lincoln, Lincolnshire LN6 7TS, UK. vbrelsford@lincoln.ac.uk. School of Psychology, University of Lincoln, Brayford Pool, Lincoln, Lincolnshire LN6 7TS, UK. kmeints@lincoln.ac.uk. Department of Psychology, State University of New York, Fredonia, NY 14063, USA. nancy.gee@fredonia.edu. WALTHAM Centre for Pet Nutrition, Waltham-on-the-Wolds, Melton Mowbray, Leicstershire LE14 4RT, UK. nancy.gee@fredonia.edu. School of Psychology, University of Lincoln, Brayford Pool, Lincoln, Lincolnshire LN6 7TS, UK. KPeffer@lincoln.ac.uk.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2017/06/24  
  ISSN 1660-4601 (Electronic) 1660-4601 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Academic Search Complete, Child Development & Adolescent Studies, Frontiers in Science, Medline, PyschArticles, PsychInfo, Science Direct, Scopus, Taylor & Francis online, and Web of Science (including Web of Knowledge) searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1431 Serial 2890  
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Author Wilhelm, B.; Rajic, A.; Greig, J.D.; Waddell, L.; Harris, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The effect of hazard analysis critical control point programs on microbial contamination of carcasses in abattoirs: a systematic review of published data Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Foodborne Pathogens and Disease Abbreviated Journal Foodborne Pathog Dis  
  Volume 8 Issue 9 Pages 949-960  
  Keywords (up) Abattoirs; Animals; Bacteria, Aerobic/isolation & purification; Evaluation Studies as Topic; Livestock/microbiology; Meat/microbiology; Meat-Packing Industry/methods; Poultry/microbiology; Safety Management/methods; Chickens; Poultry; Cattle; Pigs; Swine  
  Abstract Hazard analysis critical control point (HACCP) programs have been endorsed and implemented globally to enhance food safety. Our objective was to identify, assess, and summarize or synthesize the published research investigating the effect of HACCP programs on microbial prevalence and concentration on food animal carcasses in abattoirs through primary processing. The results of microbial testing pre- and post-HACCP implementation were reported in only 19 studies, mostly investigating beef (n=13 studies) and pork (n=8 studies) carcasses. In 12 of 13 studies measuring aerobic bacterial counts, reductions were reported on beef (7/8 studies), pork (3/3), poultry (1/1), and sheep (1/1). Significant (p<0.05) reductions in prevalence of Salmonella spp. were reported in studies on pork (2/3 studies) and poultry carcasses (3/3); no significant reductions were reported on beef carcasses (0/8 studies). These trends were confirmed through meta-analysis of these data; however, powerful meta-analysis was precluded because of an overall scarcity of individual studies and significant heterogeneity across studies. Australia reported extensive national data spanning the period from 4 years prior to HACCP implementation to 4 years post-HACCP, indicating reduction in microbial prevalence and concentration on beef carcasses in abattoirs slaughtering beef for export; however, the effect of abattoir changes initiated independent of HACCP could not be excluded. More primary research and access to relevant proprietary data are needed to properly evaluate HACCP program effectiveness using modeling techniques capable of differentiating the effects of HACCP from other concurrent factors.  
  Address Laboratory for Foodborne Zoonoses, Public Health Agency of Canada, Guelph, Ontario, Canada. bwilhelm@uoguelph.ca  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2011/05/17  
  ISSN 1556-7125 (Electronic) 1535-3141 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes AGRICOLA, CAB Abstracts, Food Science and Technology Abstracts and MEDLINE searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 814 Serial 2642  
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Author Denagamage, T.N.; O'Connor, A.M.; Sargeant, J.M.; Rajic, A.; McKean, J.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Efficacy of vaccination to reduce Salmonella prevalence in live and slaughtered swine: a systematic review of literature from 1979 to 2007 Type Journal Article
  Year 2007 Publication Foodborne Pathogens and Disease Abbreviated Journal Foodborne Pathog Dis  
  Volume 4 Issue 4 Pages 539-549  
  Keywords (up) Abattoirs; Animals; Body Weight; Consumer Product Safety; Food Contamination/prevention & control; Food Microbiology; Salmonella/growth & development/immunology; Salmonella Food Poisoning/prevention & control; Salmonella Infections, Animal/epidemiology/prevention & control; Salmonella Vaccines/immunology; Swine/microbiology; Swine Diseases/epidemiology/prevention & control; Pigs; Swine  
  Abstract A systematic review was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of vaccination to reduce Salmonella prevalence in market weight finisher swine. A search of online databases and selected conference proceedings was conducted to identify relevant studies. The review process followed relevance screening, methodological quality assessment, and data extraction. Although multiple outcomes were frequently reported, only outcomes describing culture of Salmonella were extracted. Five clinical trials and 23 challenge studies were considered likely relevant to the review as they described vaccination to reduce Salmonella in swine. Five clinical trials reported vaccination was associated with reduced isolation of Salmonella in market weight pigs, however, information required to assess the internal validity of the study was often not described in the manuscripts. All challenge studies assessed vaccine efficacy in pigs aged <15 weeks reducing the relevance of results to the review which focused on market weight pigs. Only five of the 23 challenge studies reported the majority of information necessary to evaluate the quality of vaccine studies. Given large variability in population type, sample size, type of vaccine, dose and dosing regimens, and type of outcomes observed, pooled data analysis was not possible, and therefore, a qualitative synthesis of the studies was conducted. Available evidence suggests that vaccination is associated with reduced Salmonella prevalence in swine at or near harvest; however, this conclusion is based on studies with design and reporting deficiencies that could potentially indicate biases with the outcome.  
  Address Department of Veterinary Diagnostic and Production Animal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011-1250, USA. thomasde@iastate.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2007/11/29  
  ISSN 1535-3141 (Print) 1535-3141 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes AGRICOLA, AGRIS, Biological and Agricultural Index, Biological Abstracts, Biosis Previews, CAB Abstracts, Current Contents, Dissertation Abstracts (ProQuest Digital Dissertations), Food Science and Technology Abstracts, Ingenta Gateway, MEDLINE, PubMed and Web of Science searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 645 Serial 2389  
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Author O'Connor, A.M.; Wang, B.; Denagamage, T.; McKean, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Process mapping the prevalence of Salmonella contamination on pork carcass from slaughter to chilling: a systematic review approach Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Foodborne Pathogens and Disease Abbreviated Journal Foodborne Pathog Dis  
  Volume 9 Issue 5 Pages 386-395  
  Keywords (up) Abattoirs; Animals; Developed Countries; Food Storage; Meat/microbiology; Meat-Packing Industry/methods; Salmonella/isolation & purification; Sus scrofa/microbiology; Pigs; Swine  
  Abstract A systematic review was conducted to identify and summarize primary research studies that describe the prevalence of Salmonella spp. in pork from slaughter to cooler in the member states of the European Union (EU), Australia, Canada, Hong Kong, Japan, Korea, Mexico, New Zealand, Taiwan, and United States (i.e., a process map). Relevant studies documented Salmonella spp. prevalence at more than one processing point using the same cohort of pigs or the same production line for the post-cooler component. Literature searches retrieved 6811 citations. Sixteen publications, describing 44 studies, evaluated the presence of Salmonella on pork carcasses. The carcass sampling points evaluated were as follows: stun, bleed, kill, scald, dehair, singe, polish, bung removal, evisceration, split, stamp, final wash, immediately after chill, and 18-48 h after chilling. Seventy-eight comparisons of Salmonella spp. prevalence between points along the processing line were reported. The median prevalence of Salmonella spp.-positive carcasses evaluated in the cooler was 0%. The median prevalence of Salmonella spp. after bleeding was 32%. Fifty-nine of the 78 point-to-point comparisons were associated with either no change or a decrease in Salmonella prevalence as the carcass moved closer to the cooler. Nineteen point-to-point changes showed an increase in Salmonella prevalence as the carcass moved toward the cooler; of these, six reported a greater than 10% increase in Salmonella prevalence. The majority of increases were associated with post-evisceration and splitting. These findings suggest that the processing procedures in place generally result in decreased prevalence of Salmonella spp. as the carcasses move toward the cooler.  
  Address Department of Veterinary Diagnostics and Production Animal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011, USA. oconnor@iastate.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2012/05/04  
  ISSN 1556-7125 (Electronic) 1535-3141 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, AGRICOLA, CAB Abstracts, AGRIS, MEDLINE, BIOSIS, Food Science Technology Abstracts (FSTA) Retrospective, Biological Abstracts, and Biological & Agricultural Index and FSTA searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 735 Serial 2533  
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Author Fourichon, C.; Seegers, H.; Malher, X. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effect of disease on reproduction in the dairy cow: a meta-analysis Type Journal Article
  Year 2000 Publication Theriogenology Abbreviated Journal Theriogenology  
  Volume 53 Issue 9 Pages 1729-1759  
  Keywords (up) Abomasum/physiopathology; Abortion, Veterinary/physiopathology; Anestrus/physiology; Animals; Cattle; Cattle Diseases/physiopathology; Dystocia/physiopathology/veterinary; Female; Fetal Death/physiopathology/veterinary; Ketosis/physiopathology/veterinary; Male; Mastitis, Bovine/physiopathology; Movement Disorders/physiopathology/veterinary; Ovarian Cysts/physiopathology/veterinary; Parturient Paresis/physiopathology; Placenta, Retained/physiopathology/veterinary; Pregnancy; Reproduction  
  Abstract Effects on reproduction of dystocia, stillbirth, abortion, milk fever, retained placenta, metritis, cystic ovaries, anestrus, ketosis, displaced abomasum, locomotor disorders, and mastitis were reviewed. Papers were considered if they provided quantitative estimates of diseases on days to first estrus, days to first service, conception rate at first service, days from first service to conception, days to conception or days open, calving interval, conception rates at various days post partum (dpp), and number of services per conception or per cow. Only papers in English in peer-reviewed journals were selected for analysis of post 1960 data from intensive dairy regions. Seventy papers fulfilled the selection criteria. Summary estimates of disease effects were calculated according to meta-analysis methods, and study designs were described in detail to identify possible heterogeneity of the results. Stillbirth, milk fever, displaced abomasum and mastitis had no effect on reproduction. Clinical ketosis, dystocia and retained placenta were associated with 2 to 3 more days to first service and with a 4 to 10% lower conception rate at first service, resulting in 6 to 12 more days to conception. Locomotor disorders were associated with an average increase of 12 d to conception, with wide variation depending on lesions and stage of occurrence. Metritis was associated with 7 more days to first service, 20% lower conception rate at first service, resulting in 19 more days to conception. Cystic ovaries were associated with 6 to 11 more days to first service and with 20 to 30 more days to conception. Anestrus was associated with 26 more days to first service and with an 18% lower conception rate at first service, resulting in 41 more days to conception. Abortion was associated with 70 to 80 more days to conception.  
  Address Unit of Animal Health Management, Veterinary School-INRA, Nantes, France. fourichon@vet-nantes.fr  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2000/09/01  
  ISSN 0093-691X (Print) 0093-691X (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes CAB Abstracts searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 667 Serial 2420  
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Author Constable, P.D.; Nouri, M.; Sen, I.; Baird, A.N.; Wittek, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evidence-based use of prokinetic drugs for abomasal disorders in cattle Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Veterinary Clinics of North America. Food Animal Practice Abbreviated Journal Vet Clin North Am Food Anim Pract  
  Volume 28 Issue 1 Pages 51-70, viii  
  Keywords (up) Abomasum; Animals; Cattle; Cattle Diseases/drug therapy; Erythromycin/therapeutic use; Gastric Emptying/drug effects; Gastrointestinal Agents/therapeutic use; Stomach Diseases/drug therapy/veterinary  
  Abstract Abomasal hypomotility is a prerequisite for abomasal displacement in cattle and is present immediately after surgical correction of left displaced abomasum or abomasal volvulus. Hypocalcemia, hypokalemia, and hyperinsulinemia should be corrected in cattle suspected to have abomasal hypomotility. The most effective prokinetic for calves and adult cattle suspected to have abomasal hypomotility is erythromycin.  
  Address Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Purdue University, 625 Harrison Street, West Lafayette, IN 47905-2026, USA. constabl@purdue.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2012/03/01  
  ISSN 1558-4240 (Electronic) 0749-0720 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes CAB, MEDLINE and Google Scholar searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 542 Serial 2380  
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Author Marenzoni, M.L.; Stefanetti, V.; Papa, P.; Casagrande Proietti, P.; Bietta, A.; Coletti, M.; Passamonti, F.; Henning, K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Is the horse a reservoir or an indicator of Coxiella burnetii infection? Systematic review and biomolecular investigation Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Veterinary Microbiology Abbreviated Journal Vet Microbiol  
  Volume 167 Issue 3-4 Pages 662-669  
  Keywords (up) Aborted Fetus/microbiology; Abortion, Veterinary/microbiology; Animals; Animals, Newborn/microbiology; Coxiella burnetii/genetics; Coxiella burnetii/physiology; DNA, Bacterial/blood; Female; Horse Diseases/epidemiology; Horse Diseases/microbiology; Horses; Polymerase Chain Reaction/veterinary; Pregnancy; Q Fever/diagnosis; Q Fever/epidemiology; Q Fever/microbiology; Q Fever/veterinary; Seroepidemiologic Studies; DNA, Bacterial  
  Abstract The role of the horse in Coxiella burnetii infection has not been defined. Accordingly, a twofold approach was taken to further our knowledge on this topic: (1) conduct a systematic review of the literature to establish available evidence of C. burnetii infection in the horse; (2) undertake a biomolecular investigation of 122 cases of equine abortion, stillbirth and neonatal foal death, for the presence of C. burnetii using a PCR test targeting the IS1111 gene of C. burnetii. A review of the literature turned up seven studies that identified C. burnetii DNA in equine specimens, especially aborted fetuses, while an additional 34 studies sought to determine seroprevalence of the infection in the horse. A meta-analytical approach was taken to calculate a pooled mean seroprevalence in equines based on published studies. A seroprevalence of 15.8% (95% confidence interval: 9.6-23.0%) was obtained. This figure is comparable to those previously reported in other species, especially ruminants. None of the 122 cases of equine abortion, stillbirth or neonatal foal death were positive for C. burnetii DNA. C. burnetii has rarely been looked for in equine specimens in previous studies. Cases of equine abortion should be comprehensively investigated to assess the risk of abortion in a pregnant mare infected with C. burnetii. Consideration should also be given to the possible role of the horse as a source of the organism for other animal species including humans.  
  Address Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Perugia, Via S. Costanzo 4, 06126 Perugia, Italy. Electronic address: marialuisa.marenzoni@unipg.it.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2013/10/23  
  ISSN 1873-2542 (Electronic) 0378-1135 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes MEDLINE, Science Citation Index Expanded and CAB Abstracts searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1176 Serial 2672  
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Author Habacher, G.; Pittler, M.H.; Ernst, E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effectiveness of acupuncture in veterinary medicine: systematic review Type Journal Article
  Year 2006 Publication Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine / American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Vet Intern Med  
  Volume 20 Issue 3 Pages 480-488  
  Keywords (up) Acupuncture Analgesia/veterinary; Acupuncture Therapy/veterinary; Animals; Cattle; Dogs; Horses; Musculoskeletal Diseases/therapy/veterinary; Pain/therapy/veterinary; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Sheep; Swine; Veterinary Medicine; Pigs  
  Abstract Acupuncture is a popular complementary treatment option in human medicine. Increasingly, owners also seek acupuncture for their animals. The aim of the systematic review reported here was to summarize and assess the clinical evidence for or against the effectiveness of acupuncture in veterinary medicine. Systematic searches were conducted on Medline, Embase, Amed, Cinahl, Japana Centra Revuo Medicina and Chikusan Bunken Kensaku. Hand-searches included conference proceedings, bibliographies, and contact with experts and veterinary acupuncture associations. There were no restrictions regarding the language of publication. All controlled clinical trials testing acupuncture in any condition of domestic animals were included. Studies using laboratory animals were excluded. Titles and abstracts of identified articles were read, and hard copies were obtained. Inclusion and exclusion of studies, data extraction, and validation were performed independently by two reviewers. Methodologic quality was evaluated by means of the Jadad score. Fourteen randomized controlled trials and 17 nonrandomized controlled trials met our criteria and were, therefore, included. The methodologic quality of these trials was variable but, on average, was low. For cutaneous pain and diarrhea, encouraging evidence exists that warrants further investigation in rigorous trials. Single studies reported some positive intergroup differences for spinal cord injury, Cushing's syndrome, lung function, hepatitis, and rumen acidosis. These trials require independent replication. On the basis of the findings of this systematic review, there is no compelling evidence to recommend or reject acupuncture for any condition in domestic animals. Some encouraging data do exist that warrant further investigation in independent rigorous trials.  
  Address University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna, Austria.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2006/06/01  
  ISSN 0891-6640 (Print) 0891-6640 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes MEDLINE, Embase, AMED, CINAHL, Japana Centra Revuo Medicina and Chikusan Bunken Kensaku searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 678 Serial 2443  
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Author Sannmann, I.; Arlt, S.; Heuwieser, W. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A critical evaluation of diagnostic methods used to identify dairy cows with acute post-partum metritis in the current literature Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Journal of Dairy Research Abbreviated Journal J Dairy Res  
  Volume 79 Issue 4 Pages 436-444  
  Keywords (up) Acute Disease; Animals; Body Temperature; Cattle; Cattle Diseases/diagnosis; Digital Rectal Examination/veterinary; Endometritis/diagnosis/microbiology/veterinary; Female; Puerperal Disorders/diagnosis/veterinary; Vaginal Discharge/veterinary; Veterinary Medicine/methods  
  Abstract The overall objective of this study was to investigate how relevant research publications address the validity of diagnostic methods for acute puerperal metritis (APM) in dairy cows, a disease commonly treated with antibiotic drugs. Therefore, a literature search was conducted in Journal of Dairy Science, Theriogenology, Animal Reproduction Science and The Veterinary Journal utilizing the ScienceDirect database. The search revealed 259 articles addressing APM. After applying exclusion criteria, a total of 48 trials remained. It was determined whether the author gave a clear definition of APM, the time of diagnosis relative to calving, and the person who performed the diagnosis. Studies were checked for the presence of definitions of possible findings, thresholds, and test characteristics of the methods used. Overall 9 different diagnostic methods were employed. On average 2.5 +/- 1.75 diagnostic methods were used in a study. References to support the use of the diagnostic methods were provided in 10 of 48 articles (20.8%). Vaginal discharge, transrectal palpation and rectal temperature were examined in 39, 22, and 21 of the studies, respectively. Thresholds for diagnostic tests and test characteristics were mentioned in 6 and 3 of the 48 articles, respectively. Based on this systematic review of 48 research papers the evidence supporting the use of the diagnostic methods to identify cows with APM has either been not reported or is weak. In conclusion, the reporting of the diagnostic methods to identify cows with APM needs to be improved and further high-quality research is necessary to improve diagnostic performance of the methods employed.  
  Address Clinic for Animal Reproduction, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Freie Universitat Berlin, Berlin, Germany.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2012/09/12  
  ISSN 1469-7629 (Electronic) 0022-0299 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Science Direct searched – articles from four journals as convenience sample Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1095 Serial 2590  
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Author Prankel, S.H.; Nixon, R.M.; Phillips, C.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Meta-analysis of feeding trials investigating cadmium accumulation in the livers and kidneys of sheep Type Journal Article
  Year 2004 Publication Environmental Research Abbreviated Journal Environ Res  
  Volume 94 Issue 2 Pages 171-183  
  Keywords (up) Administration, Oral; Age Factors; Animal Feed; Animals; Cadmium/administration & dosage/pharmacokinetics; Environmental Pollutants/administration & dosage/pharmacokinetics; Food Chain; Food Contamination; Humans; Kidney/chemistry; Liver/chemistry; Public Health; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Risk Assessment; Sheep/physiology; Sheep  
  Abstract Human cadmium intake derives mainly from food sources, and cadmium can be present in high concentrations in some offal. A meta-analysis using random effects modeling was carried out to integrate the results of 21 controlled randomized trials in which sheep were fed diets with elevated cadmium levels and cadmium concentrations in their livers and kidneys were recorded after slaughter. Resulting predictions of cadmium accumulation in sheep are applicable to a broad set of exposure situations allowing the critical examination of cadmium in the human food chain. The product of the cadmium concentration in the feed and the duration of exposure to that feed were significant predictors of the cadmium concentration in livers and kidneys. The predominantly organic rather than inorganic form of cadmium in the feed further increased accumulation. Other variables (dry matter intake, the vehicle of the elevated cadmium in the diet, animal age, weight, and sex) were not significant. As a result, the prime measure to decrease the risk of cadmium from animal origin adversely affecting human health should be restricting the animals' cumulative cadmium intake. It is suggested that this might be achieved by preventing the livers and kidneys of older animals from entering the human food chain.  
  Address Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0ES, UK. s.prankel@web.de  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2004/02/06  
  ISSN 0013-9351 (Print) 0013-9351 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes MEDLINE, WebSPIRS, PubMed, Embase, BIDS and AGRICOLA searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 756 Serial 2559  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Burow, E.; Simoneit, C.; Tenhagen, B.A.; Kasbohrer, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Oral antimicrobials increase antimicrobial resistance in porcine E. coli – A systematic review Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Preventive Veterinary Medicine Abbreviated Journal Prev Vet Med  
  Volume 113 Issue 4 Pages 364-75  
  Keywords (up) Administration, Oral; Animals; Anti-Infective Agents/adverse effects; Anti-Infective Agents/pharmacology; Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial; Escherichia coli/drug effects; Escherichia coli Infections/microbiology; Escherichia coli Infections/veterinary; Swine; Swine Diseases/microbiology; Anti-Infective Agents  
  Abstract Administration of antimicrobials to livestock increases the risk of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in commensal bacteria. Antimicrobials in pig production are usually administered per pen via feed which implies treatment of sick alongside with healthy animals. The objective of this systematic literature review was to investigate the effect of orally administered antimicrobials on AMR in Escherichia coli of swine. Studies published in peer reviewed journals were retrieved from the international online databases ISI Web of Knowledge, PubMed, Scopus and the national electronic literature data base of Deutsches Institut fur Medizinische Dokumentation und Information. The studies were assessed using the eligibility criteria English or German language, access to full paper version, defined treatment and control group (initial value or non-treatment) as well as administration and resistance testing of the same antimicrobial class. In the qualitative synthesis, only studies were included presenting the summary measures odds ratio or prevalence of resistance, the category of the applied antimicrobial and the dosage. An effect of the antimicrobial on AMR in E. coli was evaluated as an “increase”, “no effect” or “decrease” if the odds or alternatively the prevalence ratio were >1.0, 1.0 or <1.0, respectively. Eleven studies, describing 36 different trials, fulfilled the eligibility criteria and were finally assessed. An increase of AMR in E. coli was found in 10 out of 11 trials comparing AMR after with AMR prior to oral treatment and in 22 of the 25 trials comparing orally treated with untreated groups. Effects expressed as odds or prevalence ratios were highest for the use of aminoglycosides, quinolones and tetracycline. There was no clear association between the reported dosage and AMR towards tetracycline. Information on antimicrobial substance and dosage was missing in 4 and 5 of the 11 finally selected studies. The 36 identified trials were inhomogenous in usage and provision of information on sample size. Oral administration of antimicrobials increases the risk of AMR in E. coli from swine. There is however a lack of studies on the impact of dosage and longitudinal effects of treatment. The published studies have a number of issues concerning their scientific quality. More high quality research is needed to better address and quantifiy the effect of orally administered antimicrobials on AMR in swine.  
  Address Federal Institute for Risk Assessment, Department of Biological Safety, Diedersdorfer Weg 1, 12277 Berlin, Germany. Electronic address: Elke.Burow@bfr.bund.de.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2014/01/18  
  ISSN 1873-1716 (Electronic) 0167-5877 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Web of Knowledge, PubMed, Scopus, Deutsches Institut fur Medizinische Dokumentation und Information database and ProQuest LLC searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1192 Serial 2686  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Musther, H.; Olivares-Morales, A.; Hatley, O.J.; Liu, B.; Rostami Hodjegan, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Animal versus human oral drug bioavailability: Do they correlate? Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication European Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences Abbreviated Journal Eur J Pharm Sci  
  Volume 57 Issue Pages 280-91  
  Keywords (up) Administration, Oral; Animals; Biological Availability; Biopharmaceutics/methods; Humans; Linear Models; Models, Animal; Models, Biological; Pharmaceutical Preparations/administration & dosage; Pharmaceutical Preparations/chemistry; Pharmaceutical Preparations/metabolism; Pharmacokinetics; Species Specificity; Pharmaceutical Preparations  
  Abstract Oral bioavailability is a key consideration in development of drug products, and the use of preclinical species in predicting bioavailability in human has long been debated. In order to clarify whether any correlation between human and animal bioavailability exist, an extensive analysis of the published literature data was conducted. Due to the complex nature of bioavailability calculations inclusion criteria were applied to ensure integrity of the data. A database of 184 compounds was assembled. Linear regression for the reported compounds indicated no strong or predictive correlations to human data for all species, individually and combined. The lack of correlation in this extended dataset highlights that animal bioavailability is not quantitatively predictive of bioavailability in human. Although qualitative (high/low bioavailability) indications might be possible, models taking into account species-specific factors that may affect bioavailability are recommended for developing quantitative prediction.  
  Address Simcyp Limited (a Certara Company), Blades Enterprise Centre, John Street, Sheffield S2 4SU, UK. Electronic address: h.musther@simcyp.com.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2013/08/31  
  ISSN 1879-0720 (Electronic) 0928-0987 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, Google Scholar and known previous reports on bioavailability searched. Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1163 Serial 2659  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Olivry, T.; Mueller, R.S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evidence-based veterinary dermatology: a systematic review of the pharmacotherapy of canine atopic dermatitis Type Journal Article
  Year 2003 Publication Veterinary Dermatology Abbreviated Journal Vet Dermatol  
  Volume 14 Issue 3 Pages 121-146  
  Keywords (up) Administration, Oral; Animals; Cost-Benefit Analysis; Cyclosporine/administration & dosage; Dermatitis, Atopic/drug therapy/veterinary; Dermatology; Dog Diseases/drug therapy/economics; Dogs; Evidence-Based Medicine; Glucocorticoids/administration & dosage; Practice Guidelines as Topic; Prospective Studies; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Veterinary Medicine  
  Abstract The efficacy of pharmacological interventions used to treat canine atopic dermatitis, excluding fatty acid supplementation and allergen-specific immunotherapy, was evaluated based on the systematic review of prospective clinical trials published between 1980 and 2002. Studies were compared with regard to design characteristics (randomization generation and concealment, masking, intention-to-treat analyses and quality of enrolment of study subjects), benefit (improvement in skin lesions or pruritus scores) and harm (type, severity and frequency of adverse drug events) of the various interventions. Meta-analysis of pooled results was not possible because of heterogeneity of the drugs evaluated. Forty trials enrolling 1607 dogs were identified. There is good evidence for recommending the use of oral glucocorticoids and cyclosporin for the treatment of canine atopic dermatitis, and fair evidence for using topical triamcinolone spray, topical tacrolimus lotion, oral pentoxifylline or oral misoprostol. Insufficient evidence is available for or against recommending the prescription of oral first- and second-generation type-1 histamine receptor antagonists, tricyclic antidepressants, cyproheptadine, aspirin, Chinese herbal therapy, an homeopathic complex remedy, ascorbic acid, AHR-13268, papaverine, immune-modulating antibiotics or tranilast and topical pramoxine or capsaicin. Finally, there is fair evidence against recommending the use of oral arofylline, leukotriene synthesis inhibitors and cysteinyl leukotriene receptor antagonists.  
  Address Department of Clinical Sciences, North Carolina State University, College of Veterinary Medicine, 4700 Hillsborough Street, Raleigh, NC 27606, USA. Thierry_Olivry@ncsu.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2003/06/07  
  ISSN 0959-4493 (Print) 0959-4493 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes MEDLINE, CAB Abstracts and Web of Science searched. Updated in Olivry T, Foster AP, Mueller RS et al. (2010) Interventions for atopic dermatitis in dogs: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials, Veterinary Dermatology 21: 4-22, and Olivry T and Bizikova P (2013) A systematic review of randomized controlled trials for prevention or treatment of atopic dermatitis in dogs: 2008-2011 update, Veterinary Dermatology 24: 97-e26. Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 742 Serial 2541  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Yun, Y.; Kim, K.; Choi, I.; Ko, S.G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Topical herbal application in the management of atopic dermatitis: a review of animal studies Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Mediators of Inflammation Abbreviated Journal Mediators Inflamm  
  Volume 2014 Issue Pages 752103  
  Keywords (up) Administration, Topical Animals Dermatitis, Atopic/ drug therapy Plant Extracts/ administration & dosage/ therapeutic use Skin/drug effects/pathology  
  Abstract Herbs are widely used in the treatment of atopic dermatitis (AD) in Eastern Asian countries, and certain herbs regarded have anti-inflammatory properties that can help with AD. With the goal of developing a topical herbal agent for AD, we conducted a systematic review of in vivo studies of AD-like skin models for screening potential herbs. Searches were conducted from PubMed and EMBASE. After all, 22 studies were included for this review. We judged most of the domains of all studies to be at unclear risk of bias. Among 22 included studies, 21 herbs have been reported to reduce AD-like skin lesions in mouse models by suppressing Th2 cell response. Our findings may offer potential herbs for the topical application treatment of AD.  
  Address Department of Dermatology of Korean Medicine, College of Korean Medicine, Graduate School of Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701, Republic of Korea ; Department of Dermatology of Korean Medicine, Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, No. 149 Sangil-dong, Gangdong-gu, Seoul 134-090, Republic of Korea. Department of Ophthalmology & Otorhinolaryngology & Dermatology of Korean Medicine, College of Korean Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701, Republic of Korea. Department of Dermatology of Korean Medicine, Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, No. 149 Sangil-dong, Gangdong-gu, Seoul 134-090, Republic of Korea ; Department of Ophthalmology & Otorhinolaryngology & Dermatology of Korean Medicine, College of Korean Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701, Republic of Korea. Department of Preventive Medicine, College of Korean Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701, Republic of Korea.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2014/07/16  
  ISSN 1466-1861 (Electronic) 0962-9351 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed and Embase searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1320 Serial 2801  
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Author Mueller, R.S.; Bergvall, K.; Bensignor, E.; Bond, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A review of topical therapy for skin infections with bacteria and yeast Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Veterinary Dermatology Abbreviated Journal Vet Dermatol  
  Volume 23 Issue 4 Pages 330-41, e62  
  Keywords (up) Administration, Topical; Animals; Anti-Bacterial Agents/administration & dosage/therapeutic use; Antifungal Agents/administration & dosage/therapeutic use; Dermatomycoses/drug therapy/veterinary; Skin Diseases, Bacterial/drug therapy/veterinary; Yeasts; Dogs; Horses  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Cutaneous infections with bacteria and yeasts are common in small animal practice. Treatment with systemic antibiotics or antifungal agents may not be ideal, because of the increasing development of multiresistant organisms, the cost and the possible adverse effects. Topical antimicrobials may be used as adjunctive therapy to systemic treatment or as sole therapy instead of systemic treatment. OBJECTIVE: This literature review evaluated studies on topical antimicrobial treatment of skin infections. METHODS: In vitro and in vivo studies evaluating topical antimicrobial agents were identified using a number of electronic and manual searches of textbooks and articles. Studies were evaluated, and the evidence for or against the use of the topical agents was extracted. RESULTS: There is good evidence for the efficacy of chlorhexidine and, to a lesser degree, benzoyl peroxide in canine bacterial skin infections. There is limited evidence for the efficacy of silver sulfadiazine and medical honey against bacterial skin infections in the dog, and for the efficacy of hydrogen peroxide and stannous fluoride in the horse. Good evidence supports the use of a combination of chlorhexidine and miconazole in dogs with cutaneous Malassezia infections. There is insufficient evidence to recommend any other topical therapy for use in cutaneous infections. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL IMPORTANCE: Although many antimicrobial topicals are marketed in veterinary dermatology, the efficacy has been reported for only a minority of agents. Randomized controlled trials evaluating various topical treatments are therefore urgently needed.  
  Address Small Animal Medicine Clinic, Centre for Clinical Veterinary Medicine, Ludwig Maximilian University, Veterinaerstrasse 13, 80539 Munich, Germany. ralf.mueller@med.vetmed.uni-muenchen.de  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2012/06/27  
  ISSN 1365-3164 (Electronic) 0959-4493 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 877 Serial 2519  
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Author Nuttall, T.; Cole, L.K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evidence-based veterinary dermatology: a systematic review of interventions for treatment of Pseudomonas otitis in dogs Type Journal Article
  Year 2007 Publication Veterinary Dermatology Abbreviated Journal Vet Dermatol  
  Volume 18 Issue 2 Pages 69-77  
  Keywords (up) Administration, Topical; Animals; Anti-Bacterial Agents/administration & dosage/therapeutic use; Clinical Trials as Topic; Dog Diseases/drug therapy; Dogs; Otitis/drug therapy/veterinary; Pseudomonas Infections/drug therapy/veterinary; Research Design  
  Abstract The efficacy and safety of pharmacological interventions to treat canine Pseudomonas otitis externa and media were evaluated based on the systematic review of clinical trials published between 1967 and 2006. Clinical trials were included if Pseudomonas species were cultured from the ears of dogs with otitis externa or otitis media prior to treatment, and if the outcome of these interventions was reported at the end of the study. Studies were compared with regard to design characteristics (randomization generation and concealment, masking, intention-to-treat analyses), benefit (microbiological and/or clinical resolution of the Pseudomonas otitis), and adverse effects. Ten trials reporting data on 162 patients and 13 different pharmacological interventions were identified. Based on the accepted criteria for quality of evidence, there is insufficient evidence for or against recommending the use of any of these treatments for Pseudomonas otitis in dogs. This is largely because there is only one trial supporting the use of each treatment option and none were randomized controlled trials. Future studies need to be prospective, randomized, blinded and controlled; designed to evaluate pharmacological interventions for otitis regardless of the infective organism; have appropriate statistical advice on recruitment numbers, the power of the study and appropriate statistical analysis; include details of underlying conditions and concomitant treatments; and be designed such that inclusion criteria include microbial culture and antimicrobial sensitivity, and outcome assessments include clinical examination, cytology and microbial culture.  
  Address Faculty of Veterinary Science, The University of Liverpool Small Animal Teaching Hospital, Crown Street, Liverpool L7 7EX, UK. timn@liv.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2007/03/16  
  ISSN 0959-4493 (Print) 0959-4493 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes MEDLINE, PubMed and Web of Knowledge (Web of Science?) searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 732 Serial 2529  
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Author Purewal, R.; Christley, R.; Kordas, K.; Joinson, C.; Meints, K.; Gee, N.; Westgarth, C. doi  openurl
  Title Companion Animals and Child/Adolescent Development: A Systematic Review of the Evidence Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication International Journal of Environmental Reseasrch and Public Health Abbreviated Journal Int J Environ Res Public Health  
  Volume 14 Issue 3 Pages  
  Keywords (up) Adolescent Development; Animals; Children; Human-animal interaction; Pet ownership  
  Abstract Childhood and adolescence are important developmental phases which influence health and well-being across the life span. Social relationships are fundamental to child and adolescent development; yet studies have been limited to children's relationships with other humans. This paper provides an evidence review for the potential associations between pet ownership and emotional; behavioural; cognitive; educational and social developmental outcomes. As the field is in the early stages; a broad set of inclusion criteria was applied. A systematic search of databases and grey literature sources found twenty-two studies meeting selection criteria. The review found evidence for an association between pet ownership and a wide range of emotional health benefits from childhood pet ownership; particularly for self-esteem and loneliness. The findings regarding childhood anxiety and depression were inconclusive. Studies also showed evidence of an association between pet ownership and educational and cognitive benefits; for example, in perspective-taking abilities and intellectual development. Evidence on behavioural development was unclear due to a lack of high quality research. Studies on pet ownership and social development provided evidence for an association with increased social competence; social networks; social interaction and social play behaviour. Overall, pet ownership and the significance of children's bonds with companion animals have been underexplored; there is a shortage of high quality and longitudinal studies in all outcomes. Prospective studies that control for a wide range of confounders are required.  
  Address Institute of Infection and Global Health, and Institute of Veterinary Science, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, University of Liverpool, Leahurst Campus, Neston, Cheshire CH64 7TE, UK. r.purewal@liverpool.ac.uk. Institute of Infection and Global Health, and Institute of Veterinary Science, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, University of Liverpool, Leahurst Campus, Neston, Cheshire CH64 7TE, UK. robc@liverpool.ac.uk. Department of Epidemiology and Environmental Health, University at Buffalo, 270 Farber Hall, Buffalo, NY 14214, USA. kkordas@buffalo.edu. School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, 39 Whatley Road, Bristol BS8 2PS, UK. kkordas@buffalo.edu. School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, 39 Whatley Road, Bristol BS8 2PS, UK. carol.joinson@bristol.ac.uk. School of Psychology, University of Lincoln, Brayford Pool, Lincoln, Lincolnshire LN6 7TS, UK. kmeints@lincoln.ac.uk. Department of Psychology, State University of New York, Fredonia, NY 14063, USA. nancy.gee@fredonia.edu. WALTHAM Centre for Pet Nutrition, Waltham-on-the-Wolds, Melton Mowbray, Leics LE14 4RT, UK. nancy.gee@fredonia.edu. Institute of Infection and Global Health, and Institute of Veterinary Science, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, University of Liverpool, Leahurst Campus, Neston, Cheshire CH64 7TE, UK. carri.westgarth@liverpool.ac.uk.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2017/03/08  
  ISSN 1660-4601 (Electronic) 1660-4601 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PsycINFO, CINAHL, PubMed, MEDLINE, Web of Science, ScienceDirect and grey literature searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1437 Serial 2897  
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Author Platt, B.; Hawton, K.; Simkin, S.; Mellanby, R.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Systematic review of the prevalence of suicide in veterinary surgeons Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication Occupational Medicine (Oxford, England) Abbreviated Journal Occup Med (Lond)  
  Volume 60 Issue 6 Pages 436-446  
  Keywords (up) Adolescent; Adult; Epidemiologic Methods; Female; Firearms/statistics & numerical data; Great Britain/epidemiology; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Poisoning/epidemiology; Stress, Psychological/epidemiology; Suicide/psychology/statistics & numerical data; Veterinarians/psychology/statistics & numerical data; Young Adult  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: An accumulating body of research demonstrates that risk of suicide varies between occupational groups. Identification of the occupations at risk, and the factors that contribute to the increased risk of suicide in these groups is essential for the development of effective suicide prevention strategies. There is preliminary evidence to suggest that veterinary surgeons are a group at risk. AIMS: To conduct a systematic review of studies of rates and methods of suicide in the veterinary profession. METHODS: A systematic search of the international research literature was performed in May 2008. The data from the 19 studies of the prevalence of suicide in the veterinary profession were extracted by two independent reviewers and analysed. RESULTS: Between 0 and 43% of veterinary surgeon deaths were due to suicide. In all but one of the 15 studies presenting risk of suicide in veterinary surgeons with a comparison population, an elevated risk was found. The better quality studies with the lowest risk of bias indicated that in the UK, the rate of suicide in the veterinary profession was at least three times the general population rate. Studies of the methods of suicide veterinary surgeons use suggest that self-poisoning and firearms are particularly common. CONCLUSIONS: There appears to be an elevated risk of suicide for veterinary surgeons in several countries. Access to means of suicide influences the methods used and may contribute to increased risk.  
  Address Centre for Suicide Research, Department of Psychiatry, University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 7JX, UK. belinda.platt@psy.ox.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2010/07/02  
  ISSN 1471-8405 (Electronic) 0962-7480 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes MEDLINE, Embase, AMED, BNI, CINAHL, PsycINFO, SCOPUS, Web of Science and IBSS searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 850 Serial 2555  
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