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Author Bashardoust Tajali, S.; Macdermid, J.C.; Houghton, P.; Grewal, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of low power laser irradiation on bone healing in animals: a meta-analysis Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Research Abbreviated Journal J Orthop Surg Res  
  Volume 5 Issue (up) Pages 1  
  Keywords Animals; Rabbits  
  Abstract PURPOSE: The meta-analysis was performed to identify animal research defining the effects of low power laser irradiation on biomechanical indicators of bone regeneration and the impact of dosage. METHODS: We searched five electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, PubMed, CINAHL, and Cochrane Database of Randomised Clinical Trials) for studies in the area of laser and bone healing published from 1966 to October 2008. Included studies had to investigate fracture healing in any animal model, using any type of low power laser irradiation, and use at least one quantitative biomechanical measures of bone strength. There were 880 abstracts related to the laser irradiation and bone issues (healing, surgery and assessment). Five studies met our inclusion criteria and were critically appraised by two raters independently using a structured tool designed for rating the quality of animal research studies. After full text review, two articles were deemed ineligible for meta-analysis because of the type of injury method and biomechanical variables used, leaving three studies for meta-analysis. Maximum bone tolerance force before the point of fracture during the biomechanical test, 4 weeks after bone deficiency was our main biomechanical bone properties for the Meta analysis. RESULTS: Studies indicate that low power laser irradiation can enhance biomechanical properties of bone during fracture healing in animal models. Maximum bone tolerance was statistically improved following low level laser irradiation (average random effect size 0.726, 95% CI 0.08-1.37, p 0.028). While conclusions are limited by the low number of studies, there is concordance across limited evidence that laser improves the strength of bone tissue during the healing process in animal models.  
  Address Department of Physical Therapy, Elborn College, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6G1H1, Canada. sbashar@uwo.ca  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2010/01/06  
  ISSN 1749-799X (Electronic) 1749-799X (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes MEDLINE, Embase, PubMed, CINAHL and Cochrane Database of Randomised Clinical Trials searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 431 Serial 2350  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Lefebvre, F.; Crivelli, A.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Salinity effects on anguillicolosis in Atlantic eels: a natural tool for disease control Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Marine Ecology Progress Series Abbreviated Journal Mar Ecol Progr  
  Volume 471 Issue (up) Pages 193-202  
  Keywords Protozoan, Helminth, Mollusc and Arthropod Parasites of Animals [LL822]; Aquaculture (Animals) [MM120]; Aquatic Biology and Ecology [MM300]; Water Resources [PP200]; Pathogens, Parasites and Infectious Diseases (Wild Animals) [YY700]; animal parasitic nematodes; aquatic animals; aquatic organisms; disease control; disease prevalence; epidemiology; habitat management; habitats; infection; lagoons; literature reviews; meta-analysis; nematode infections; salinity; systematic reviews; water; Anguilla rostrata; Anguillicoloides crassus; eels; European eels; France; Anguilla; Anguillidae; Anguilliformes; Osteichthyes; fishes; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; eukaryotes; Anguillicoloides; Anguillicolidae; Rhabditida; Chromadoria; Chromadorea; Nematoda; invertebrates; Developed Countries; European Union Countries; Mediterranean Region; OECD Countries; Western Europe; Europe; animal-parasitic nematodes; aquatic species; nematode parasites of animals; nematodes; nematodes of animals; [Indexed using CAB Thesaurus terms]  
  Abstract Anguillicolosis, the disease caused by the invasive nematode Anguillicoloides crassus, is one of the many threats facing the already endangered Atlantic eel species. We conducted a systematic review of literature data linking water salinity and prevalence of the infection during the continental phase of Anguilla anguilla and A. rostrata. Overall, we showed a significant negative relationship across all sites (rS=-0.42, n=77). In order to limit the effect of confounding factors (e.g. variable latitudes and parasite introduction dates), we performed a meta-analysis on the correlation coefficients calculated from data within studies (restricted period and area) and revealed a stronger negative relationship (r-=-0.75, n=13). Finally, using our long-term monitoring in a French Mediterranean lagoon, we documented a step decrease in both parasite prevalence and induced swimbladder pathologies in response to increased salinity values. Salinity effects manifested with an apparent threshold value around 15 per mil and are readily appreciable in young-of-the-year eels. To date, managing around water salinity parameters remains one of the best options to control the ever-expanding infection (both in aquaculture and in the wild) and to improve the quality of future spawners en route to the Sargasso Sea.  
  Address Biological Station of the Tour du Valat, Le Sambuc, 13200 Arles, France. a.crivelli@tourduvalat.org  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0171-8630 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Helminthological Abstracts, Web of Science and Zoological Record searched. Database record copyright CAB International 2010 Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 889 Serial 2482  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Baker, N.J.; Bancroft, B.A.; Garcia, T.S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A meta-analysis of the effects of pesticides and fertilizers on survival and growth of amphibians Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Science of the Total Environment Abbreviated Journal Sci Total Environ  
  Volume 449 Issue (up) Pages 150-156  
  Keywords Amphibians/growth & development/physiology; Animals; Fertilizers/toxicity; Models, Theoretical; Pesticides/toxicity; Survival Analysis; Amphibians  
  Abstract The input of agrochemicals has contributed to alteration of community composition in managed and associated natural systems, including amphibian biodiversity. Pesticides and fertilizers negatively affect many amphibian species and can cause mortality and sublethal effects, such as reduced growth and increased susceptibility to disease. However, the effect of pesticides and fertilizers varies among amphibian species. We used meta-analytic techniques to quantify the lethal and sublethal effects of pesticides and fertilizers on amphibians in an effort to review the published work to date and produce generalized conclusions. We found that pesticides and fertilizers had a negative effect on survival of -0.9027 and growth of -0.0737 across all reported amphibian species. We also observed differences between chemical classes in their impact on amphibians: inorganic fertilizers, organophosphates, chloropyridinyl, phosphonoglycines, carbamates, and triazines negatively affected amphibian survival, while organophosphates and phosphonoglycines negatively affected amphibian growth. Our results suggest that pesticides and fertilizers are an important stressor for amphibians in agriculturally dominated systems. Furthermore, certain chemical classes are more likely to harm amphibians. Best management practices in agroecosystems should incorporate amphibian species-specific response to agrochemicals as well as life stage dependent susceptibility to best conserve amphibian biodiversity in these landscapes.  
  Address Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331-3803, USA. nick.baker@oregonstate.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2013/02/21  
  ISSN 1879-1026 (Electronic) 0048-9697 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Aquatic Sciences and Fisheries Abstract, BIOSIS, Environmental Sciences and Pollution Management, Web of Science and Wildlife and Ecology Studies Worldwide searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 885 Serial 2346  
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Author Boerman, I.; Selvarajah, G.T.; Nielen, M.; Kirpensteijn, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Prognostic factors in canine appendicular osteosarcoma – a meta-analysis Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication BMC Veterinary Research Abbreviated Journal BMC Vet Res  
  Volume 8 Issue (up) Pages 56  
  Keywords Animals; Dog Diseases/diagnosis/pathology; Dogs; Extremities/pathology; Osteosarcoma/diagnosis/pathology/veterinary; Prognosis  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Appendicular osteosarcoma is the most common malignant primary canine bone tumor. When treated by amputation or tumor removal alone, median survival times (MST) do not exceed 5 months, with the majority of dogs suffering from metastatic disease. This period can be extended with adequate local intervention and adjuvant chemotherapy, which has become common practice. Several prognostic factors have been reported in many different studies, e.g. age, breed, weight, sex, neuter status, location of tumor, serum alkaline phosphatase (SALP), bone alkaline phosphatase (BALP), infection, percentage of bone length affected, histological grade or histological subtype of tumor. Most of these factors are, however, only reported as confounding factors in larger studies. Insight in truly significant prognostic factors at time of diagnosis may contribute to tailoring adjuvant therapy for individual dogs suffering from osteosarcoma. The objective of this study was to systematically review the prognostic factors that are described for canine appendicular osteosarcoma and validate their scientific importance. RESULTS: A literature review was performed on selected studies and eligible data were extracted. Meta-analyses were done for two of the three selected possible prognostic factors (SALP and location), looking at both survival time (ST) and disease free interval (DFI). The third factor (age) was studied in a qualitative manner. Both elevated SALP level and the (proximal) humerus as location of the primary tumor are significant negative prognostic factors for both ST and DFI in dogs with appendicular osteosarcoma. Increasing age was associated with shorter ST and DFI, however, was not statistically significant because information of this factor was available in only a limited number of papers. CONCLUSIONS: Elevated SALP and proximal humeral location are significant negative prognosticators for canine osteosarcoma.  
  Address Department of Clinical Sciences of Companion Animals, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2012/05/17  
  ISSN 1746-6148 (Electronic) 1746-6148 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed and Google Scholar searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 838 Serial 2363  
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Author Brainard, B.M.; Boller, M.; Fletcher, D.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title RECOVER evidence and knowledge gap analysis on veterinary CPR. Part 5: Monitoring Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Journal of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care (San Antonio, Tex. : 2001) Abbreviated Journal J Vet Emerg Crit Care (San Antonio)  
  Volume 22 Suppl 1 Issue (up) Pages S65-84  
  Keywords Animals; Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation/veterinary; Cats; Dogs; Evidence-Based Medicine; Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice; Heart Arrest/therapy/veterinary; Humans; Monitoring, Physiologic/veterinary; Practice Guidelines as Topic; Treatment Outcome; Veterinarians/psychology; Veterinary Medicine/standards  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To systematically examine the evidence on patient monitoring before, during, and following veterinary CPR and to identify scientific knowledge gaps. DESIGN: Standardized, systematic evaluation of the literature, categorization of relevant articles according to level of evidence and quality, and development of consensus on conclusions for application of the concepts to clinical practice. Relevant questions were answered on a worksheet template and reviewed by the Reassessment Campaign on Veterinary Resuscitation (RECOVER) monitoring domain members, by the RECOVER committee and opened for comments by veterinary professionals for 3 months. SETTING: Academia, referral practice, and general practice. RESULTS: Eighteen worksheets evaluated monitoring practices relevant for diagnosing cardiopulmonary arrest (CPA), monitoring CPR efforts, identifying return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), and post-ROSC monitoring. CONCLUSIONS: Although veterinary clinical trials are lacking, experimental literature using canine models and human clinical trials provided relevant data. The major conclusions from this analysis of the literature highlight the utility of end-tidal carbon dioxide (EtCO(2)) monitoring to identify ROSC and possibly to evaluate quality of CPR. In addition, recommendations for ECG analysis during CPR were addressed. Unless the patient is instrumented at the time of CPA, other monitoring devices (eg, Doppler flow probe) are likely not useful for diagnosis of CPA, and the possibility of pulseless electrical activity makes ECG inappropriate as a sole diagnostic tool. Optimal monitoring of the intra- and postcardiac arrest patient remains to be determined in clinical veterinary medicine, and further evaluation of the prognostic and prescriptive utility of EtCO(2) monitoring will provide material for future studies in veterinary CPR.  
  Address Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602-7371, USA. brainard@uga.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2012/08/03  
  ISSN 1476-4431 (Electronic) 1476-4431 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Systematic search described in accompanying methodology paper. MEDLINE and CAB Abstracts searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 586 Serial 2365  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Caja, G.; Roca, X.; Salama, A.K.K. url  isbn
openurl 
  Title [A meta-analysis for comparing dry matter intake prediction models in dairy goats] Type Book Chapter
  Year 2011 Publication XIV Jornadas sobre Produccion Animal, Zaragoza, Espana, 17 y 18 de mayo de 2011 Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue (up) Pages 216-218  
  Keywords Dairy Animals [LL110]; Animal Nutrition (Production Responses) [LL520]; Mathematics and Statistics [ZZ100]; body weight; dairy performance; dry matter; feed intake; meta-analysis; milk fat; milk yield; milk yielding animals; models; performance traits; goats; [Indexed using CAB Thesaurus terms]  
  Abstract Currently available models for dairy goats (INRA, 2007; NRC, 2007; Avondo et al., 2008) estimated dry matter intake (DMI) from body weight (BW) and milk yield (MY). A model comparison for similar BW showed marked differences in predicted DMI depending on MY (0 to 6 L/d). A meta-analysis of dairy goat intake data published in 125 papers indexed in PubMed and Science Direct was done, resulting in a total of 219 values normally distributed. Milk yield was standardized to 3.5% milk fat (MY3.5%). Goat performances ranged from 29.0 to 85.5 kg BW, 0.4 to 6.2 L/d MY3.5% and 0.8 to 3.5 kg DMI/d. Prediction models were (+or-SEM; P<0.001): DMI (+or-0.099)=1.233+0.370 x MY3.5%; R2=0.69 DMI (+or-0.075)=0.553+0.277 x MY3.5%+0.018 x BW; R2=0.76 The meta-analysis models showed the lowest error of prediction (-0.030 kg DM/d), being lower than those of the Avondo et al. (-0.092 kg DM/d) and INRA (-0.101 kg DM/d) models. On the contrary, the NRC overestimated intake (+0.185 kg DM/d).  
  Address Grup de Recerca en Remugants (G2R), Departament de Ciencia Animal i dels Aliments, Facultat de Veterinaria, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona), Spain. gerardo.caja@uab.es  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Asociacion Interprofesional para el Desarrollo Agrario Place of Publication Zaragoza Editor  
  Language Spanish Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title XIV Jornadas sobre Produccion Animal, Zaragoza, Espana, 17 y 18 de mayo de 2011  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN 978-84-615-0062-8 Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed and Science Direct searched. Database record copyright CAB International 2010 Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 296 Serial 2370  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Christopher, M.M.; Marusic, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Geographic trends in research output and citations in veterinary medicine: insight into global research capacity, species specialization, and interdisciplinary relationships Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication BMC Veterinary Research Abbreviated Journal BMC Vet Res  
  Volume 9 Issue (up) Pages 115  
  Keywords Veterinary research  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Bibliographic data can be used to map the research quality and productivity of a discipline. We hypothesized that bibliographic data would identify geographic differences in research capacity, species specialization, and interdisciplinary relationships within the veterinary profession that corresponded with demographic and economic indices. RESULTS: Using the SCImago portal, we retrieved veterinary journal, article, and citation data in the Scopus database by year (1996-2011), region, country, and publication in species-specific journals (food animal, small animal, equine, miscellaneous), as designated by Scopus. In 2011, Scopus indexed 165 journals in the veterinary subject area, an increase from 111 in 1996. As a percentage of veterinary research output between 1996 and 2010, Western Europe and North America (US and Canada) together accounted for 60.9% of articles and 73.0% of citations. The number of veterinary articles increased from 8815 in 1996 to 19,077 in 2010 (net increase 66.6%). During this time, publications increased by 21.0% in Asia, 17.2% in Western Europe, and 17.0% in Latin America, led by Brazil, China, India, and Turkey. The United States had the highest number of articles in species-specific journals. As a percentage of regional output, the proportion of articles in small animal and equine journals was highest in North America and the proportion of articles in food animal journals was highest in Africa. Based on principal component analysis, total articles were highly correlated with gross domestic product (based on World Bank data). The proportion of articles in small animal and equine journals was associated with gross national income, research and development, and % urban population, as opposed to the proportion of food animal articles, agricultural output, and % rural population. Co-citations linked veterinary medicine with medicine in the United States, with basic sciences in Eastern Europe and the Far East, and with agriculture in most other regions and countries. CONCLUSIONS: Bibliographic data reflect the demographic changes affecting veterinary medicine worldwide and provide insight into current and changing global research capacity, specialization, and interdisciplinary affiliations. A more detailed analysis of species-specific trends is warranted and could contribute to a better understanding of educational and workforce needs in veterinary medicine.  
  Address School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, One Shields Ave, Davis, CA 95616, USA. mmchristopher@ucdavis.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2013/06/14  
  ISSN 1746-6148 (Electronic) 1746-6148 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Scopus searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1155 Serial 2376  
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Author Conan, A.; Goutard, F.L.; Sorn, S.; Vong, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Biosecurity measures for backyard poultry in developing countries: a systematic review Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication BMC Veterinary Research Abbreviated Journal BMC Vet Res  
  Volume 8 Issue (up) Pages 240  
  Keywords Animal Husbandry/methods; Animals; Developing Countries; Poultry; Poultry Diseases/prevention & control; Chickens  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Poultry represents an important sector in animal production, with backyard flocks representing a huge majority, especially in the developing countries. In these countries, villagers raise poultry to meet household food demands and as additional sources of incomes. Backyard production methods imply low biosecurity measures and high risk of infectious diseases, such as Newcastle disease or zoonosis such as Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI).We reviewed literature on biosecurity practices for prevention of infectious diseases, and published recommendations for backyard poultry and assessed evidence of their impact and feasibility, particularly in developing countries. Documents were sourced from the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) website, and from Pubmed and Google databases. RESULTS: A total of 62 peer-reviewed and non-referred documents were found, most of which were published recently (after 2004) and focused on HPAI/H5N1-related biosecurity measures (64%). Recommendations addressed measures for flock management, feed and water management, poultry trade and stock change, poultry health management and the risk to humans. Only one general guideline was found for backyard poultry-related biosecurity; the other documents were drawn up for specific developing settings and only engaged their authors (e.g. consultants). These national guidelines written by consultants generated recommendations regarding measures derived from the highest standards of commercial poultry production. Although biosecurity principles of isolation and containment are described in most documents, only a few documents were found on the impact of measures in family poultry settings and none gave any evidence of their feasibility and effectiveness for backyard poultry. CONCLUSIONS: Given the persistent threat posed by HPAI/H5N1 to humans in developing countries, our findings highlight the importance of encouraging applied research toward identifying sustained and adapted biosecurity measures for smallholder poultry flocks in low-income countries.  
  Address Epidemiology and Public Health Unit, Institut Pasteur du Cambodge, Reseau International des Instituts Pasteur, Phnom Penh, Cambodia. aconan@hotmail.fr  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2012/12/12  
  ISSN 1746-6148 (Electronic) 1746-6148 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed and Google searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1105 Serial 2379  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Downes, M.J.; Dean, R.S.; Stavisky, J.H.; Adams, V.J.; Grindlay, D.J.; Brennan, M.L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Methods used to estimate the size of the owned cat and dog population: a systematic review Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication BMC Veterinary Research Abbreviated Journal BMC Vet Res  
  Volume 9 Issue (up) Pages 121  
  Keywords Animals; Bias (Epidemiology); Cats; Dogs; Epidemiologic Methods/veterinary; Humans; Ownership/statistics & numerical data; Pets  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: There are a number of different methods that can be used when estimating the size of the owned cat and dog population in a region, leading to varying population estimates. The aim of this study was to conduct a systematic review to evaluate the methods that have been used for estimating the sizes of owned cat and dog populations and to assess the biases associated with those methods.A comprehensive, systematic search of seven electronic bibliographic databases and the Google search engine was carried out using a range of different search terms for cats, dogs and population. The inclusion criteria were that the studies had involved owned or pet domestic dogs and/or cats, provided an estimate of the size of the owned dog or cat population, collected raw data on dog and cat ownership, and analysed primary data. Data relating to study methodology were extracted and assessed for biases. RESULTS: Seven papers were included in the final analysis. Collection methods used to select participants in the included studies were: mailed surveys using a commercial list of contacts, door to door surveys, random digit dialled telephone surveys, and randomised telephone surveys using a commercial list of numbers. Analytical and statistical methods used to estimate the pet population size were: mean number of dogs/cats per household multiplied by the number of households in an area, human density multiplied by number of dogs per human, and calculations using predictors of pet ownership. CONCLUSION: The main biases of the studies included selection bias, non-response bias, measurement bias and biases associated with length of sampling time. Careful design and planning of studies is a necessity before executing a study to estimate pet populations.  
  Address Centre for Evidence-based Veterinary Medicine, School of Veterinary Medicine and Science, The University of Nottingham, Sutton Bonington Campus, LE12 5RD, Loughborough, UK. martin.downes@nottingham.ac.uk.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2013/06/20  
  ISSN 1746-6148 (Electronic) 1746-6148 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes CAB Abstracts, Web of Science, MEDLINE, Embase, PubMed, BIOSIS Previews, Zoological Record and Google searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1112 Serial 2397  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Downs, S.H.; Parry, J.; Nunez-Garcia, J.; Abernethy, D.A.; Broughan, J.M.; Cameron, A.R.; Cook, A.J.; Rua-Domenech, R. de la; Goodchild, A.V.; Greiner, M.; Gunn, J.; More, S.J.; Rhodes, S.; Rolfe, S.; Sharp, M.; Upton, P.; Vordermeier, H.M.; Watson, E.; Welsh, M.; Whelan, A.O.; Woolliams, J.A.; Clifton-Hadley, R.S. isbn  openurl
  Title Meta-analysis of diagnostic test performance and modelling of testing strategies for control of bovine tuberculosis in GB Type Book Chapter
  Year 2011 Publication Proceedings of the Society for Veterinary Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Leipzig, Germany, 23 Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue (up) Pages 139-153  
  Keywords Dairy Animals [LL110]; Prion, Viral, Bacterial and Fungal Pathogens of Animals [LL821]; Diagnosis of Animal Diseases [LL886]; Mathematics and Statistics [ZZ100]; control programmes; cows; dairy cattle; dairy cows; dairy herds; diagnosis; diagnostic techniques; disease control; disease prevalence; disease prevention; disease transmission; epidemiology; estimates; mathematical models; meta-analysis; monitoring; probability; risk; statistical analysis; tuberculosis; cattle; Mycobacterium bovis; UK; Bos; Bovidae; ruminants; Artiodactyla; mammals; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; ungulates; eukaryotes; Mycobacterium; Mycobacteriaceae; Corynebacterineae; Actinomycetales; Actinobacteridae; Actinobacteria; Bacteria; prokaryotes; British Isles; Western Europe; Europe; Commonwealth of Nations; Developed Countries; European Union Countries; OECD Countries; cattle; [Indexed using CAB Thesaurus terms]  
  Abstract The British Government spends over <pounds>100 million per annum on the control of bovine tuberculosis (bTB). Improvement in the control through targeted use of diagnostic tests is one focus of eradication plans. The aims were: (a) through systematic literature review identify primary research with estimates of sensitivity (Se) and specificity (Sp) for diagnostic tests for bTB in cattle (b) conduct a statistical meta-analysis to estimate test performance, and (c) using the estimates, model and compare different testing strategies. Of 9782 references reviewed, only 261 met agreed criteria and contained performance estimates for one or more of 14 diagnostic tests. The performance of bTB surveillance systems using the estimates of test performance was affected by the historical probability of herd freedom and the risk of introduction of infection. Where the probability of introduction of infection was high, it was difficult to achieve a high target probability of herd freedom from infection.  
  Address Veterinary Laboratories Agency-Weybridge, New Haw, Addlestone, Surrey, KT15 3NB, UK. s.downs@vla.defra.gsi.gov.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Society for Veterinary Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine Place of Publication Roslin Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title Proceedings of the Society for Veterinary Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Leipzig, Germany, 23  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN 978-0-948073-99-1 Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Web of Science, Current Contents, CAB Abstracts, MEDLINE, Embase, AGRICOLA and AGRIS searched. Database record copyright CAB International 2010 Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 310 Serial 2398  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Hopper, K.; Epstein, S.E.; Fletcher, D.J.; Boller, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title RECOVER evidence and knowledge gap analysis on veterinary CPR. Part 3: Basic life support Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Journal of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care (San Antonio, Tex. : 2001) Abbreviated Journal J Vet Emerg Crit Care (San Antonio)  
  Volume 22 Suppl 1 Issue (up) Pages S26-43  
  Keywords Animals; Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation/veterinary; Cats; Consensus; Dogs; Emergency Medical Services; Evidence-Based Medicine; Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice; Heart Arrest/prevention & control/therapy/veterinary; Humans; Practice Guidelines as Topic; Veterinarians/psychology; Veterinary Medicine/standards  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To systematically examine the evidence on basic life support (BLS) in veterinary CPR and to determine knowledge gaps. DESIGN: Standardized, systematic evaluation of the literature, categorization of relevant articles according to level of evidence and quality, and development of consensus on conclusions for application of the concepts to clinical practice. Relevant questions were answered on a worksheet template and reviewed by the Reassessment Campaign on Veterinary Resuscitation (RECOVER) BLS domain members, by the RECOVER committee and opened for comments by veterinary professionals for 30 days. SETTING: Academia, referral practice, and general practice. RESULTS: Sixteen worksheets were prepared to evaluate techniques for chest compression and ventilation strategies as well as identification of cardiopulmonary arrest (CPA). Major recommendations arising from this evidence review include performing chest compressions at a rate of at least 100/min at a compression depth of one-third to half the width of the chest with minimal pauses, and early instigation of ventilation at a rate of 8-10 breaths/min in intubated patients, or using a 30:2 compression/ventilation ratio in nonintubated patients. CONCLUSIONS: Although veterinary clinical trials are lacking, much of the experimental literature on BLS utilized canine models. The major conclusions from this analysis of the literature are the importance of early identification of CPA, and immediate initiation of BLS in these patients. Many knowledge gaps exist, most importantly in our understanding of the optimal hand placement and technique for chest compressions, warranting coordinated future studies targeted at questions of relevance to differences between veterinary species and humans.  
  Address School of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Veterinary Surgical and Radiological Sciences, University of California at Davis, Davis, CA 95616, USA. khopper@ucdavis.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2012/08/03  
  ISSN 1476-4431 (Electronic) 1476-4431 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Systematic search described in accompanying methodology paper. MEDLINE and CAB Abstracts searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 589 Serial 2454  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Klopfleisch, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Multiparametric and semiquantitative scoring systems for the evaluation of mouse model histopathology – a systematic review Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication BMC Veterinary Research Abbreviated Journal BMC Vet Res  
  Volume 9 Issue (up) Pages 123  
  Keywords Animals; Disease Models, Animal; Intestinal Diseases/pathology; Intestinal Diseases/veterinary; Mice/anatomy & histology; Nervous System Diseases/pathology; Nervous System Diseases/veterinary; Osteoarthritis/pathology; Osteoarthritis/veterinary; Pathology/standards; Severity of Illness Index; Mice; Mouse; Pathology  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Histopathology has initially been and is still used to diagnose infectious, degenerative or neoplastic diseases in humans or animals. In addition to qualitative diagnoses semiquantitative scoring of a lesion`s magnitude on an ordinal scale is a commonly demanded task for histopathologists. Multiparametric, semiquantitative scoring systems for mouse models histopathology are a common approach to handle these questions and to include histopathologic information in biomedical research. RESULTS: Inclusion criteria for scoring systems were a first description of a multiparametric, semiquantiative scoring systems which comprehensibly describe an approach to evaluate morphologic lesion. A comprehensive literature search using these criteria identified 153 originally designed semiquantitative scoring systems for the analysis of morphologic changes in mouse models covering almost all organs systems and a wide variety of disease models. Of these, colitis, experimental autoimmune encephalitis, lupus nephritis and collagen induced osteoarthritis colitis were the disease models with the largest number of different scoring systems. Closer analysis of the identified scoring systems revealed a lack of a rationale for the selection of the scoring parameters or a correlation between scoring parameter value and the magnitude of the clinical symptoms in most studies. CONCLUSION: Although a decision for a particular scoring system is clearly dependent on the respective scientific question this review gives an overview on currently available systems and may therefore allow for a better choice for the respective project.  
  Address Department of Veterinary Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Freie Universitat Berlin, Berlin, Germany. robert.klopfleisch@fu-berlin.de.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2013/06/27  
  ISSN 1746-6148 (Electronic) 1746-6148 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1110 Serial 2473  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Loss, S.R.; Will, T.; Marra, P.P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The impact of free-ranging domestic cats on wildlife of the United States Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Nature communications Abbreviated Journal Nat Commun  
  Volume 4 Issue (up) Pages 1396  
  Keywords Animals; Animals, Domestic/physiology; Animals, Wild/physiology; Birds/physiology; Cats/physiology; Humans; Predatory Behavior/physiology; Survival Analysis; United States; Cats  
  Abstract Anthropogenic threats, such as collisions with man-made structures, vehicles, poisoning and predation by domestic pets, combine to kill billions of wildlife annually. Free-ranging domestic cats have been introduced globally and have contributed to multiple wildlife extinctions on islands. The magnitude of mortality they cause in mainland areas remains speculative, with large-scale estimates based on non-systematic analyses and little consideration of scientific data. Here we conduct a systematic review and quantitatively estimate mortality caused by cats in the United States. We estimate that free-ranging domestic cats kill 1.4-3.7 billion birds and 6.9-20.7 billion mammals annually. Un-owned cats, as opposed to owned pets, cause the majority of this mortality. Our findings suggest that free-ranging cats cause substantially greater wildlife mortality than previously thought and are likely the single greatest source of anthropogenic mortality for US birds and mammals. Scientifically sound conservation and policy intervention is needed to reduce this impact.  
  Address Migratory Bird Center, Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute, National Zoological Park, P.O. Box 37012 MRC 5503, Washington, District of Columbia 20013, USA. LossS@si.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2013/01/31  
  ISSN 2041-1723 (Electronic) 2041-1723 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes JSTOR, Google Scholar and Web of Science searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1123 Serial 2487  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Martinez de Albornoz, P.; Khanna, A.; Longo, U.G.; Forriol, F.; Maffulli, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The evidence of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound for in vitro, animal and human fracture healing Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication British Medical Bulletin Abbreviated Journal Br Med Bull  
  Volume 100 Issue (up) Pages 39-57  
  Keywords Animals; Disease Models, Animal; Evidence-Based Medicine/methods; Fracture Healing/radiation effects; Fractures, Bone/physiopathology/therapy; Humans; Treatment Outcome; Ultrasonic Therapy/methods  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Physical stimulation therapies are currently available to enhance fracture healing. SOURCES OF DATA: A search of PubMed, Medline, CINAHL, DH data and Embase databases was performed using the keywords 'ultrasound' and 'fracture healing'. AREAS OF AGREEMENT: The evidence in vitro and animal studies suggests that low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) produces significant osteoinductive effects, accelerating the healing process and improving the bone-bending strength. AREAS OF CONTROVERSY: The evidence in human trials is controversial in fresh, stress fractures and in limb lengthening. LIPUS is effective in delayed unions, in smokers and in diabetic population. GROWING POINTS: LIPUS is an alternative, less invasive form of treatment for complicated fractures, in patients with poor bone healing and may play a role in the management of large-scale bone defects producing substantial cost savings and decreasing associated disability. AREAS TIMELY FOR DEVELOPING RESEARCH: There is heterogeneity among in vitro, animal studies and their application to human studies. Further randomized controlled trials of high methodological quality are needed.  
  Address Department of Trauma and Orthopaedic Surgery, FREMAP Hospital, Ctra de Pozuelo 61, 28220 Majadahonda, Madrid, Spain.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2011/03/25  
  ISSN 1471-8391 (Electronic) 0007-1420 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, MEDLINE, CINAHL and Embase searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 549 Serial 2496  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author McMichael, M.; Herring, J.; Fletcher, D.J.; Boller, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title RECOVER evidence and knowledge gap analysis on veterinary CPR. Part 2: Preparedness and prevention Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Journal of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care (San Antonio, Tex. : 2001) Abbreviated Journal J Vet Emerg Crit Care (San Antonio)  
  Volume 22 Suppl 1 Issue (up) Pages S13-25  
  Keywords Animals; Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation/veterinary; Cat Diseases/therapy; Cats; Consensus; Dog Diseases/therapy; Dogs; Emergency Medical Services/standards; Evidence-Based Medicine; Guideline Adherence; Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice; Heart Arrest/prevention & control/therapy/veterinary; Humans; Practice Guidelines as Topic; Species Specificity; Treatment Outcome; Veterinarians/psychology; Veterinary Medicine/standards  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To systematically examine the evidence on the effect of prevention and preparedness measures on outcomes in veterinary cardiopulmonary resuscitation and to determine knowledge gaps. DESIGN: Standardized, systematic evaluation of the literature, categorization of relevant articles according to level of evidence and quality, and development of consensus on conclusions for application of the concepts to clinical practice. Relevant questions were answered on a worksheet template and reviewed by the Reassessment Campaign on Veterinary Resuscitation (RECOVER) prevention and preparedness domain members, by the RECOVER committee, and opened for comments by veterinary professionals for 3 months. SETTING: Academia, referral practice, and general practice. RESULTS: Nine worksheets were prepared to determine the extent to which preparation of the environment (charts, visual aids, etc) and personnel (training, debriefing, etc) are beneficial in improving return of spontaneous circulation. CONCLUSIONS: Of the questions evaluated, only the association between anesthesia-related cardiopulmonary arrest and better outcomes was supported by strong evidence. There is some evidence from the human literature that the use of cognitive aids, standardized didactic, and hands-on training with high-fidelity simulators, team and leadership training, and post-cardiac arrest debriefing improve adherence to cardiopulmonary resuscitation guidelines and, in some cases, patient outcomes. Veterinary studies investigating these issues are lacking, and development of initial guidelines is a crucial first step.  
  Address College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61802, USA. mmcm@illinois.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2012/08/03  
  ISSN 1476-4431 (Electronic) 1476-4431 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Systematic search described in accompanying methodology paper. MEDLINE and CAB Abstracts searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 591 Serial 2502  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Mignini, L.E.; Khan, K.S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Methodological quality of systematic reviews of animal studies: a survey of reviews of basic research Type Journal Article
  Year 2006 Publication BMC Medical Research Methodology Abbreviated Journal BMC Med Res Methodol  
  Volume 6 Issue (up) Pages 10  
  Keywords Animal Experimentation/standards; Animals; Benchmarking; Data Interpretation, Statistical; Disease Models, Animal; Humans; Quality Control; Reproducibility of Results; Research Design/standards; Review Literature as Topic  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Systematic reviews can serve as a tool in translation of basic life sciences research from laboratory to human research and healthcare. The extent to which reviews of animal research are systematic and unbiased is not known. METHODS: We searched, without language restrictions, Medline, Embase, bibliographies of known reviews (1996-2004) and contacted experts to identify citations of reviews of basic science literature which, as a minimum, performed search of a publicly available resource. From these we identified reviews of animal studies where laboratory variables were measured or where treatments were administered to live animals to examine their effects, and compared them with reviews of bench studies in which human or animal tissues, cell systems or organ preparations were examined in laboratories to better understand mechanisms of diseases. RESULTS: Systematic reviews of animal studies often lacked methodological features such as specification of a testable hypothesis (9/30, 30%); literature search without language restriction (8/30, 26.6%); assessment of publication bias (5/30, 16.6%), study validity (15/30, 50%) and heterogeneity (10/30, 33.3%); and meta-analysis for quantitative synthesis (12/30, 40%). Compared to reviews of bench studies, they were less prone to bias as they specified the question (96.6% vs. 80%, p = 0.04), searched multiple databases (60% vs. 26.6%, p = 0.01), assessed study quality (50% vs. 20%, p = 0.01), and explored heterogeneity (33.3% vs. 2.2%, p = 0.001) more often. CONCLUSION: There seems to be a gradient of frequency of methodological weaknesses among reviews: Attempted systematic reviews of whole animal research tend to be better than those of bench studies, though compared to systematic reviews of human clinical trials they are apparently poorer. There is a need for rigour when reviewing animal research.  
  Address Centro Rosarino de Estudios Perinatales, Rosario, Argentina. l.mignini@bham.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2006/03/15  
  ISSN 1471-2288 (Electronic) 1471-2288 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Embase and MEDLINE searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 469 Serial 2506  
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Author Rozanski, E.A.; Rush, J.E.; Buckley, G.J.; Fletcher, D.J.; Boller, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title RECOVER evidence and knowledge gap analysis on veterinary CPR. Part 4: Advanced life support Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Journal of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care (San Antonio, Tex. : 2001) Abbreviated Journal J Vet Emerg Crit Care (San Antonio)  
  Volume 22 Suppl 1 Issue (up) Pages S44-64  
  Keywords Advanced Cardiac Life Support/methods/psychology/veterinary; Animals; Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation/veterinary; Cats; Dogs; Electric Countershock/veterinary; Epinephrine/therapeutic use; Evidence-Based Medicine; Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice; Heart Arrest/therapy/veterinary; Humans; Practice Guidelines as Topic; Veterinarians/psychology; Veterinary Medicine/standards  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To systematically evaluate the evidence of the effect of advanced life support techniques on outcome in veterinary cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and to outline knowledge gaps. DESIGN: Standardized, systematic evaluation of the literature, categorization of relevant articles according to level of evidence and quality, and development of consensus on conclusions for application of the concepts to clinical practice. SETTING: Academia, referral practice, and general practice RESULTS: Sixteen population, intervention, control group, outcome questions were evaluated to determine if recommendations could be made concerning drug therapy, including vasopressors, vagolytics, corticosteroids, reversal agents, buffer therapy, and correction of electrolyte disturbances. Electrical defibrillation strategies as well as other advanced interventions such as open-chest CPR, impedance threshold devices, and special considerations regarding anesthesia-related cardiopulmonary arrest (CPA) were also investigated. CONCLUSIONS: There is strong evidence supporting the use of standard-dose (0.01 mg/kg) epinephrine in CPR, as well as early electrical defibrillation for animals experiencing CPA due to ventricular fibrillation or pulseless ventricular tachycardia, preferentially using a biphasic defibrillator. For CPA due to certain causes and with the availability of advanced postcardiac arrest support, open chest CPR is preferred. Many knowledge gaps regarding other pharmacologic and advanced therapies were identified, and further studies are recommended to better systematically address these questions.  
  Address Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, Tufts University, North Grafton, MA, USA. elizabeth.rozanski@tufts.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2012/08/03  
  ISSN 1476-4431 (Electronic) 1476-4431 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Systematic search described in accompanying methodology paper. MEDLINE and CAB Abstracts searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 595 Serial 2581  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Smarick, S.D.; Haskins, S.C.; Boller, M.; Fletcher, D.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title RECOVER evidence and knowledge gap analysis on veterinary CPR. Part 6: Post-cardiac arrest care Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Journal of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care (San Antonio, Tex. : 2001) Abbreviated Journal J Vet Emerg Crit Care (San Antonio)  
  Volume 22 Suppl 1 Issue (up) Pages S85-101  
  Keywords Aftercare; Animals; Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation/veterinary; Cats; Dogs; Evidence-Based Medicine; Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice; Heart Arrest/therapy/veterinary; Humans; Practice Guidelines as Topic; Survival Rate; Treatment Outcome; Veterinarians/psychology; Veterinary Medicine/standards  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To systematically examine the evidence for interventions after the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) on outcomes from veterinary cardiopulmonary resuscitation and to determine important knowledge gaps. DESIGN: Standardized, systematic evaluation of the literature, categorization of relevant articles according to level of evidence and quality, and development of consensus on conclusions for application of the concepts to clinical post-cardiac arrest care. SETTING: Academia, referral practice, and general practice. RESULTS: Fifteen standardized clinical questions important for post-cardiac arrest care were asked and research articles relevant to answering these questions were identified through structured, explicit literature database searches. The majority of these articles report research in species other than dogs or cats or consisted of experimental work in canine cardiac arrest models. Outcome metrics reported in these studies widely varied and ranged from quantification of mechanistic endpoints, such as elaboration of reactive oxygen species, to survival, and functional neurologic outcome. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the near complete absence of clinical veterinary studies, the process allowed the formulation of statements for several postcardiac arrest treatments that were either supportive, such as mild therapeutic hypothermia or controlled reoxygenation, or neutral, such as for mannitol administration or seizure prophylaxis. Evidence grading allowed transparency in regards to the strength of these recommendations. Moreover, numerous knowledge gaps emerged that will allow generation of a road map for progress in veterinary post-cardiac arrest care.  
  Address AVETS, Monroeville, PA 15146, USA. smarick@avets.us  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2012/08/03  
  ISSN 1476-4431 (Electronic) 1476-4431 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Systematic search described in accompanying methodology paper. MEDLINE and CAB Abstracts searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 598 Serial 2599  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Waghorn, G.C.; Northover, S.A. isbn  openurl
  Title Milk production response to iodine supplementation – will it work in New Zealand cows: results of a literature search Type Book Chapter
  Year 1992 Publication Trace elements: roles, risks and remedies. Proceedings of the New Zealand Trace Elements Group Conference Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue (up) Pages 116-122  
  Keywords Animal Nutrition (Physiology) [LL510]; Dairy Animals [LL110]; cows; feeding; goitre; iodine; milk production; milk yield; nutritional state; supplements; cattle; New Zealand; Bos; Bovidae; ruminants; Artiodactyla; mammals; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; ungulates; eukaryotes; Australasia; Oceania; Developed Countries; Commonwealth of Nations; OECD Countries; [Indexed using CAB Thesaurus terms]  
  Abstract As endemic goitre was widespread in New Zealand before the introduction of iodized salt, it was assumed that ruminants, particularly dairy cows, may benefit from iodine supplementation although clinical signs of I deficiency are rare. Several trials with sheep have not indicated any significant response in productivity to I supplements, but no definitive trials have been made with dairy cows. Estimates of pasture I concentrations are variable and requirements for lactating cows are imprecise. To ascertain the possibility of a response to I supplements, 2 literature searches, with CAB ABSTRACTS and DIALOG, were made and the procedures involved in each search are described. There were only 3 data sets in which the effect of I supplementation was studied in cows with an inadequate I intake. There was no response in terms of milk production or composition. It is suggested that, in the absence of goitrogens, pasture I less than 500 mu g/kg DM may be adequate for lactating cows but there are insufficient data on pasture or milk I in New Zealand to make an informed judgment on I status in dairy cows.  
  Address AgResearch, Private Bag 11008, Palmerston North, New Zealand.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Massey University Place of Publication Palmerston North Editor Lee, J.; Turner, M.A.; Joblin, K.N.; Grace, N.D.; Savage, G.P.  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title Trace elements: roles, risks and remedies. Proceedings of the New Zealand Trace Elements Group Confe  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN 0-473-01893-4 Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes CAB Abstracts and DIALOG searched (Note: DIALOG is a search interface, not a defined database). Database record copyright CAB International 2010 Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 417 Serial 2637  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Wilkins, W.; Rajic, A.; Parker, S.; Waddell, L.; Sanchez, J.; Sargeant, J.; Waldner, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Examining heterogeneity in the diagnostic accuracy of culture and PCR for Salmonella spp. in swine: a systematic review/meta-regression approach Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication Zoonoses and Public Health Abbreviated Journal Zoonoses Public Health  
  Volume 57 Suppl 1 Issue (up) Pages 121-134  
  Keywords Animals; Diagnostic Tests, Routine/methods/standards/veterinary; Genetic Heterogeneity; Polymerase Chain Reaction/methods/veterinary; Salmonella/classification/isolation & purification; Salmonella Infections, Animal/diagnosis/microbiology; Sensitivity and Specificity; Swine/microbiology; Swine Diseases/diagnosis/microbiology; Temperature; Swine; Pigs  
  Abstract The accuracy of bacterial culture and PCR for Salmonella in swine was examined through systematic review of existing primary research in this field. A replicable search was conducted in 10 electronic databases. All steps of the review were conducted by two reviewers: to identify relevant publications, to assess their methodological soundness and reporting, and to extract raw data or reported test accuracy estimates. Meta-analyses and meta-regression were performed: to evaluate pooled estimates of test sensitivity (Se) and specificity (Sp), to identify variables explaining the variation in reported test estimates, and to evaluate the association between these variables and reported test Se and Sp. Twenty-nine studies were included in the review. Unique test evaluations reported in these 29 studies were categorized according to the type of test comparison: culture versus culture (n = 134 test evaluations) and PCR versus culture (n = 21). We identified significant heterogeneity among evaluations for each test category. For culture, more heterogeneity was caused by differences in individual test protocols (52%) than overall differences between studies (16%). Enrichment temperature, study population, agar and enrichment type were significantly associated with variation in culture Se. Furthermore, interaction between enrichment temperature and enrichment type was detected. For PCR, most of the heterogeneity was caused by overall differences between studies (65-70%); sample type and study size were associated with variation in reported PCR Se and Sp. The overall methodological soundness and/or reporting of primary studies included in this review were poor, with variable use of reference standards, and consistent lack of the use or reporting of blinding, randomization and subject (sample) selection criteria. Consequently, the food safety and veterinary public health research community should formally consider ways for standardizing the conduct and reporting of this type of research.  
  Address Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, Western College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, SK, Canada. wendy.wilkins@usask.ca  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2010/12/02  
  ISSN 1863-2378 (Electronic) 1863-1959 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes AGRICOLA, CAB Abstracts, PubMed, BIOSYS Previews, Web of Science, Food Science and Technology Abstracts, CISTI, Scopus, Dissertation and Theses (ProQuest) and Theses Canada Portal searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 818 Serial 2646  
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