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Author Caja, G.; Roca, X.; Salama, A.K.K. url  isbn
openurl 
  Title [A meta-analysis for comparing dry matter intake prediction models in dairy goats] Type Book Chapter
  Year 2011 Publication XIV Jornadas sobre Produccion Animal, Zaragoza, Espana, 17 y 18 de mayo de 2011 Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 216-218  
  Keywords Dairy Animals [LL110]; Animal Nutrition (Production Responses) [LL520]; Mathematics and Statistics [ZZ100]; body weight; dairy performance; dry matter; feed intake; meta-analysis; milk fat; milk yield; milk yielding animals; models; performance traits; goats; [Indexed using CAB Thesaurus terms]  
  Abstract Currently available models for dairy goats (INRA, 2007; NRC, 2007; Avondo et al., 2008) estimated dry matter intake (DMI) from body weight (BW) and milk yield (MY). A model comparison for similar BW showed marked differences in predicted DMI depending on MY (0 to 6 L/d). A meta-analysis of dairy goat intake data published in 125 papers indexed in PubMed and Science Direct was done, resulting in a total of 219 values normally distributed. Milk yield was standardized to 3.5% milk fat (MY3.5%). Goat performances ranged from 29.0 to 85.5 kg BW, 0.4 to 6.2 L/d MY3.5% and 0.8 to 3.5 kg DMI/d. Prediction models were (+or-SEM; P<0.001): DMI (+or-0.099)=1.233+0.370 x MY3.5%; R2=0.69 DMI (+or-0.075)=0.553+0.277 x MY3.5%+0.018 x BW; R2=0.76 The meta-analysis models showed the lowest error of prediction (-0.030 kg DM/d), being lower than those of the Avondo et al. (-0.092 kg DM/d) and INRA (-0.101 kg DM/d) models. On the contrary, the NRC overestimated intake (+0.185 kg DM/d).  
  Address Grup de Recerca en Remugants (G2R), Departament de Ciencia Animal i dels Aliments, Facultat de Veterinaria, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona), Spain. gerardo.caja@uab.es  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Asociacion Interprofesional para el Desarrollo Agrario Place of Publication Zaragoza Editor  
  Language Spanish Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title XIV Jornadas sobre Produccion Animal, Zaragoza, Espana, 17 y 18 de mayo de 2011  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (up) ISBN 978-84-615-0062-8 Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed and Science Direct searched. Database record copyright CAB International 2010 Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 296 Serial 2370  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Downs, S.H.; Parry, J.; Nunez-Garcia, J.; Abernethy, D.A.; Broughan, J.M.; Cameron, A.R.; Cook, A.J.; Rua-Domenech, R. de la; Goodchild, A.V.; Greiner, M.; Gunn, J.; More, S.J.; Rhodes, S.; Rolfe, S.; Sharp, M.; Upton, P.; Vordermeier, H.M.; Watson, E.; Welsh, M.; Whelan, A.O.; Woolliams, J.A.; Clifton-Hadley, R.S. isbn  openurl
  Title Meta-analysis of diagnostic test performance and modelling of testing strategies for control of bovine tuberculosis in GB Type Book Chapter
  Year 2011 Publication Proceedings of the Society for Veterinary Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Leipzig, Germany, 23 Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 139-153  
  Keywords Dairy Animals [LL110]; Prion, Viral, Bacterial and Fungal Pathogens of Animals [LL821]; Diagnosis of Animal Diseases [LL886]; Mathematics and Statistics [ZZ100]; control programmes; cows; dairy cattle; dairy cows; dairy herds; diagnosis; diagnostic techniques; disease control; disease prevalence; disease prevention; disease transmission; epidemiology; estimates; mathematical models; meta-analysis; monitoring; probability; risk; statistical analysis; tuberculosis; cattle; Mycobacterium bovis; UK; Bos; Bovidae; ruminants; Artiodactyla; mammals; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; ungulates; eukaryotes; Mycobacterium; Mycobacteriaceae; Corynebacterineae; Actinomycetales; Actinobacteridae; Actinobacteria; Bacteria; prokaryotes; British Isles; Western Europe; Europe; Commonwealth of Nations; Developed Countries; European Union Countries; OECD Countries; cattle; [Indexed using CAB Thesaurus terms]  
  Abstract The British Government spends over <pounds>100 million per annum on the control of bovine tuberculosis (bTB). Improvement in the control through targeted use of diagnostic tests is one focus of eradication plans. The aims were: (a) through systematic literature review identify primary research with estimates of sensitivity (Se) and specificity (Sp) for diagnostic tests for bTB in cattle (b) conduct a statistical meta-analysis to estimate test performance, and (c) using the estimates, model and compare different testing strategies. Of 9782 references reviewed, only 261 met agreed criteria and contained performance estimates for one or more of 14 diagnostic tests. The performance of bTB surveillance systems using the estimates of test performance was affected by the historical probability of herd freedom and the risk of introduction of infection. Where the probability of introduction of infection was high, it was difficult to achieve a high target probability of herd freedom from infection.  
  Address Veterinary Laboratories Agency-Weybridge, New Haw, Addlestone, Surrey, KT15 3NB, UK. s.downs@vla.defra.gsi.gov.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Society for Veterinary Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine Place of Publication Roslin Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title Proceedings of the Society for Veterinary Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Leipzig, Germany, 23  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (up) ISBN 978-0-948073-99-1 Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Web of Science, Current Contents, CAB Abstracts, MEDLINE, Embase, AGRICOLA and AGRIS searched. Database record copyright CAB International 2010 Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 310 Serial 2398  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Waghorn, G.C.; Northover, S.A. isbn  openurl
  Title Milk production response to iodine supplementation – will it work in New Zealand cows: results of a literature search Type Book Chapter
  Year 1992 Publication Trace elements: roles, risks and remedies. Proceedings of the New Zealand Trace Elements Group Conference Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 116-122  
  Keywords Animal Nutrition (Physiology) [LL510]; Dairy Animals [LL110]; cows; feeding; goitre; iodine; milk production; milk yield; nutritional state; supplements; cattle; New Zealand; Bos; Bovidae; ruminants; Artiodactyla; mammals; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; ungulates; eukaryotes; Australasia; Oceania; Developed Countries; Commonwealth of Nations; OECD Countries; [Indexed using CAB Thesaurus terms]  
  Abstract As endemic goitre was widespread in New Zealand before the introduction of iodized salt, it was assumed that ruminants, particularly dairy cows, may benefit from iodine supplementation although clinical signs of I deficiency are rare. Several trials with sheep have not indicated any significant response in productivity to I supplements, but no definitive trials have been made with dairy cows. Estimates of pasture I concentrations are variable and requirements for lactating cows are imprecise. To ascertain the possibility of a response to I supplements, 2 literature searches, with CAB ABSTRACTS and DIALOG, were made and the procedures involved in each search are described. There were only 3 data sets in which the effect of I supplementation was studied in cows with an inadequate I intake. There was no response in terms of milk production or composition. It is suggested that, in the absence of goitrogens, pasture I less than 500 mu g/kg DM may be adequate for lactating cows but there are insufficient data on pasture or milk I in New Zealand to make an informed judgment on I status in dairy cows.  
  Address AgResearch, Private Bag 11008, Palmerston North, New Zealand.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Massey University Place of Publication Palmerston North Editor Lee, J.; Turner, M.A.; Joblin, K.N.; Grace, N.D.; Savage, G.P.  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title Trace elements: roles, risks and remedies. Proceedings of the New Zealand Trace Elements Group Confe  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (up) ISBN 0-473-01893-4 Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes CAB Abstracts and DIALOG searched (Note: DIALOG is a search interface, not a defined database). Database record copyright CAB International 2010 Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 417 Serial 2637  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author International Livestock Research Institute url  openurl
  Title Mapping of poverty and likely zoonoses hotspots Type Report
  Year 2012 Publication Mapping of poverty and likely zoonoses hotspots, Zoonoses Project 4, Report to Department for International Development, UK Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 119 pp  
  Keywords Agricultural Economics [EE110] Veterinary Economics [EE117] Health Economics [EE118] Income and Poverty [EE950] Prion, Viral, Bacterial and Fungal Pathogens of Animals [LL821] Protozoan, Helminth, Mollusc and Arthropod Parasites of Animals [LL822] Meteorology and Climate [PP500] Prion, Viral, Bacterial and Fungal Pathogens of Humans [VV210] Protozoan, Helminth and Arthropod Parasites of Humans [VV220] Occupational Health and Safety [VV900] agroecological zones animal diseases animal production climate change disease transmission emerging infectious diseases farmers human diseases infectious diseases livestock mapping occupational hazards poverty productivity zoonoses man Developing Countries countries Homo Hominidae Primates mammals vertebrates Chordata animals eukaryotes; [Indexed using CAB Thesaurus terms]  
  Abstract This report aims to present data and expert knowledge on poverty and zoonoses hotspots to inform prioritization of study areas on the transmission of disease in emerging livestock systems in the developing world, where prevention of zoonotic disease might bring greatest benefit to poor people. The first chapter reviews the substantial literature on prioritizing disease and identifies prioritization criteria relevant to this study, namely: burden of human disease; impacts on livestock production and productivity; amenability to agricultural intervention; and, concern because of emergence or severity. This allowed the identification of 24 zoonoses of high importance to poor people, 13 of which were investigated in depth. The next chapter reviews current evidence on poverty and livestock, on livestock systems and their dynamics, and on zoonoses and how they are currently mapped. The map of poor livestock keepers is updated and an additional map based on subnational data is presented. Maps of livestock systems that are changing most rapidly in response to emerging markets are also presented, and vulnerability to climate change is described. The strengths and weaknesses of different maps are noted. The next chapter presents evidence from a systematic review of over 1000 studies on the prevalence of the 13 priority zoonoses in people and animals. It focuses on the endemic zoonoses that impose greatest burden and a 'top 20' list is given of geographical hotspots. Data on zoonoses are also extracted from the WHO Global Burden of Disease and the 'top 20' countries identified. A case study that compares our systematic review with an 'in-country review' focusing on grey literature and literature in a language other than English is included. Some of the challenges of the study and caution in interpreting the results are discussed. The next chapter updates the map of emerging disease events. For the first time, emerging zoonoses are mapped as distinct from other emerging disease events. The last chapter provides maps of regional agroecosystems and summarizes numbers of livestock, people and poor livestock keepers by system as well as the zoonoses context. It also draws some global conclusions from the study.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher ILRI Place of Publication Nairobi Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (up) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, CAB Direct (CAB Abstracts?), Google and Google Scholar searched. Database record copyright CAB International 2010. Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1166 Serial 2662  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Newman, J. url  openurl
  Title Human-directed dog aggression: A systematic review Type Book Whole
  Year 2012 Publication Thesis Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords dogs; aggression; bite; behaviour; epidemiology; risk factor  
  Abstract Human-directed dog aggression is a worldwide issue with major public health and animal welfare implications. Consequences for the target of aggression range from fear and minor injury, to life threatening injury and death, and for the dog impaired freedoms, restricted interactions and ultimately euthanasia. The systematic review undertaken here aimed to identify and assimilate all robust evidence regarding factors that affect the risk of human-directed dog aggression. Such information is vital for the development of sound preventive strategies. Multiple electronic literature databases were interrogated in order to identify all evidence for risk factors of human-directed dog aggression. The search strategy was designed to minimise the risk of publication and language biases, specificity was sacrificed for sensitivity. The threshold for acceptance of evidence was predetermined at a moderate level; any study that provided evidence with a low risk of confounding and bias and a moderate probability that any relationship identified was causal would reach the final review. Appraisal examined methodological quality, study design, selection process, measurement of outcome and exposures, and type and quality of analysis. All stages of appraisal were undertaken blind to the study findings. On assimilating the evidence identified, no robust evidence for any risk factors of human-directed dog aggression was identified. Eight studies provided a moderate level of somewhat conflicting evidence. Amongst those studies appraised as failing to reach the moderate level of acceptable evidence, the majority were excluded as a result of multiple limitations. It is vital that future research is undertaken to a high methodological standard in order that it provides robust evidence for the effect of any risk factor identified.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis Master's thesis  
  Publisher University of Liverpool Place of Publication Liverpool Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Master of Philosophy Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (up) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Department of Veterinary Clinical Science Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1265 Serial 2753  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Aghajafari, F.; Murphy, K.; Matthews, S.; Ohlsson, A.; Amankwah, K.; Hannah, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Repeated doses of antenatal corticosteroids in animals: a systematic review Type Journal Article
  Year 2002 Publication American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology Abbreviated Journal Am J Obstet Gynecol  
  Volume 186 Issue 4 Pages 843-849  
  Keywords Adrenal Cortex Hormones/administration & dosage/adverse effects; Animals; Behavior, Animal/drug effects; Betamethasone/administration & dosage/adverse effects; Birth Weight; Embryonic and Fetal Development/drug effects; Female; Fetal Growth Retardation/chemically induced; Fetal Organ Maturity; Haplorhini; Lung/embryology; Medline; Male; Mice; Placebos; Pregnancy; Rabbits; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Sheep  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this review was to assess the effects of repeated doses of antenatal corticosteroids on lung and brain function and on growth restriction in animals. STUDY DESIGN: MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched for randomized controlled trials that compared repeated doses of antenatal corticosteroids versus a single dose, with or without placebo, in pregnant animals. RESULTS: Nineteen studies were included. The animals that were studied included sheep, monkeys, rabbits, and mice. There were 8 studies that assessed the effects of repeated doses of antenatal corticosteroids on lung function. All the studies reported improvement in lung function after repeated doses of antenatal corticosteroids. Seven studies investigated the effects of repeated doses of antenatal corticosteroids on brain or nervous system function or growth; all the studies found adverse effects with repeated doses of antenatal corticosteroids. Eleven studies looked at the effect of repeated doses of antenatal corticosteroids on fetal growth. Nine studies found evidence of fetal growth restriction with repeated doses of antenatal corticosteroids. One study assessed long-term behavioral outcomes in mice and found no effect. CONCLUSION: Evidence from randomized controlled trials in animals suggests that repeated doses of antenatal corticosteroids may have beneficial effects in terms of lung function but may have adverse effects on brain function and fetal growth. Because of the differences between animals and humans, it is difficult to extrapolate directly the results of these studies to humans. Therefore, randomized controlled trials in humans are needed to assess the effects of repeated courses of antenatal corticosteroids for pregnant women who are at increased risk of preterm birth in terms of important perinatal, neonatal, and maternal outcomes.  
  Address Institute of Medical Sciences, Maternal, Infant and Reproductive Health Research Unit, Center for Research in Women's Health, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Center, University of Toronto, Ontario.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2002/04/23  
  ISSN (up) 0002-9378 (Print) 0002-9378 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes MEDLINE and Embase searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 503 Serial 2332  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Aceto, H.; Miller, S.A.; Smith, G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Onset of diarrhea and pyrexia and time to detection of Salmonella enterica subsp enterica in feces in experimental studies of cattle, horses, goats, and sheep after infection per os Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association Abbreviated Journal J Am Vet Med Assoc  
  Volume 238 Issue 10 Pages 1333-1339  
  Keywords Animals; Diarrhea/microbiology/pathology/veterinary; Feces/microbiology; Fever/microbiology/pathology/veterinary; Salmonella Infections, Animal/microbiology/pathology; Salmonella enterica/physiology; Species Specificity; Cattle; Horses; Goats; Sheep  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To determine time to first detection of Salmonella organisms in feces of animals after experimental infection PO and times to onset of diarrhea and pyrexia to evaluate a common method for identifying nosocomial infections on the basis of time of admission and onset of clinical signs (ie, the 3-day criterion). DESIGN: Meta-analysis. SAMPLE POPULATION: Cattle, horses, goats, and sheep experimentally infected PO with Salmonella enterica subsp enterica. PROCEDURES: Online databases were searched for published reports describing results of experimental infection of cattle, horses, goats, and sheep PO with salmonellae. Time to detection of organisms in feces as well as to onset of diarrhea and pyrexia was noted. Analysis of covariance was used to examine relationships among these variables, host species and age, and Salmonella serovar and magnitude of infecting dose. RESULTS: Forty-three studies met the criteria for inclusion. Time to detection of salmonellae in feces ranged from 0.5 to 4 days. Times to onset of diarrhea and pyrexia ranged from 0.33 to 11 days and from 0.27 to 5 days, respectively. Time to onset of diarrhea was related to host age and Salmonella serovar. No other associations were identified. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Time to detection of salmonellae in feces is unreliable for identifying hospital-acquired infections; a 3-day criterion will misidentify hospital- versus community-acquired infections. Relying on clinical indices such as times to onset of diarrhea and pyrexia to trigger fecal sampling for detection of Salmonella infection will increase the risk of environmental contamination and nosocomial spread because animals may begin shedding organisms in feces several days prior.  
  Address Department of Clinical Studies, New Bolton Center, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Kennett Square, PA 19348, USA.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2011/05/17  
  ISSN (up) 0003-1488 (Print) 0003-1488 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, MEDLINE, AGRICOLA, Biosis Previews and CAB Abstracts searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 607 Serial 2328  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Aragon, C.L.; Hofmeister, E.H.; Budsberg, S.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Systematic review of clinical trials of treatments for osteoarthritis in dogs Type Journal Article
  Year 2007 Publication Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association Abbreviated Journal J Am Vet Med Assoc  
  Volume 230 Issue 4 Pages 514-521  
  Keywords Animals; Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/therapeutic use; Chondroitin/therapeutic use; Clinical Trials as Topic; Dog Diseases/drug therapy/pathology; Dogs; Evidence-Based Medicine; Glucosamine/therapeutic use; Osteoarthritis/drug therapy/pathology/veterinary; Severity of Illness Index; Thiazines/therapeutic use; Thiazoles/therapeutic use; Treatment Outcome  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To identify and critically evaluate the quality of evidence of the most commonly used pharmacologic, nutraceutical, and purported slow-acting drugs of osteoarthritis for the management of osteoarthritis in dogs by use of the FDA's evidence-based medicine scoring system. DESIGN: Systematic review. SAMPLE POPULATION: 16 clinical trials. PROCEDURES: A broad bibliographic search was performed prior to May 2006. Inclusion criteria focused on prospective trials evaluating commonly used medical treatment interventions for the management of osteoarthritis in dogs and published in peer-reviewed journals. The analysis consisted of the following: study design rating, quality factor rating, quantity rating, consistency rating, relevance to disease risk reduction rating, and cumulative strength of evidence ranking. RESULTS: 4 trials evaluating meloxicam were rated as type I. Three trials evaluating carprofen were rated as type I, and 2 trials were rated as type III. One trial evaluating each of the following agents was rated as type 1: etodolac; P54FP; polysulfated glycosaminoglycan; and a combination of chondroitin sulfate, glucosamine hydrochloride, and manganese ascorbate. Two trials evaluating pentosan polysulphate and 2 trails evaluating green-lipped mussels were rated as type I. One trial evaluating hyaluronan was rated as type III. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: A high level of comfort exists for meloxicam that the claimed relationship is scientifically valid and that its use is clinically efficacious for the treatment of osteoarthritis in dogs. A moderate level of comfort exists for carprofen; etodolac; pentosan polysulphate; green-lipped mussels; P54FP; polysulfated glycosaminoglycans; and a combination of chondroitin sulfate, glucosamine hydrochloride, and manganese ascorbate. An extremely low level of comfort exists for hyaluronan.  
  Address Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2007/02/17  
  ISSN (up) 0003-1488 (Print) 0003-1488 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes CAB Abstracts, MEDLINE, PubMed and VIN searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 614 Serial 2338  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Aspirin, G.M.; Gordon-Evans, W.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title What is the evidence? Intervertebral disk disease Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association Abbreviated Journal J Am Vet Med Assoc  
  Volume 237 Issue 10 Pages 1151-1152  
  Keywords Animals; Dog Diseases/diagnosis/surgery; Dogs; Evidence-Based Practice; Female; Intervertebral Disc Degeneration/diagnosis/surgery/veterinary; Magnetic Resonance Imaging/veterinary; Myelography/veterinary; Spinal Cord Compression/diagnosis/surgery/veterinary; Tomography, X-Ray Computed/veterinary  
  Abstract  
  Address Department of Veterinary Clinical Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61802, USA. geraldineaspirin@gmail.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2010/11/16  
  ISSN (up) 0003-1488 (Print) 0003-1488 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 432 Serial 2341  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Baker, W.S.; Gray, G.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A review of published reports regarding zoonotic pathogen infection in veterinarians Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association Abbreviated Journal J Am Vet Med Assoc  
  Volume 234 Issue 10 Pages 1271-1278  
  Keywords Animals; Humans; Occupational Diseases/epidemiology; Risk Factors; Veterinarians/statistics & numerical data; Zoonoses/epidemiology/transmission  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To identify published reports regarding zoonotic pathogen infection among veterinarians. DESIGN: Literature review. PROCEDURES: The PubMed electronic database of medical literature published between 1966 and November 2007 was searched. Clinical case reports and reports of outbreak investigations were also identified through searches of the literature outside of PubMed and searches of references listed in included articles. Reports eligible for inclusion included controlled and uncontrolled studies examining seroprevalence of animal pathogens in veterinarians, serosurveys involving veterinarians, and reports of zoonotic pathogen infections causing clinical illness. RESULTS: 66 relevant articles were identified. This included 44 seroepidemiologic studies (some examined > 1 pathogen), 12 case reports, 3 outbreak investigations, and 7 self-reported surveys (including 4 related to personal protective equipment use). Of the 44 seroepidemiologic studies, 37 (84%) identified an increased risk of zoonotic pathogen infection among veterinarians, and 7 (16%) identified no increased risk or a decreased risk. Surveys also documented that veterinarians often failed to use recommended personal protective equipment. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Our review indicated that veterinarians had an increased risk of infection with a number of zoonotic pathogens. It also suggested that veterinarians may inadvertently serve as biological sentinels for emerging pathogens and could potentially spread zoonotic pathogens to their families, community members, and the animals for which they provide care. Professional and policy measures should be implemented to reduce the risk that veterinarians will become infected with, or transmit, zoonotic pathogens.  
  Address Center for Emerging Infectious Diseases, Department of Epidemiology, College of Public Health, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52241, USA.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2009/05/16  
  ISSN (up) 0003-1488 (Print) 0003-1488 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes MEDLINE searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 871 Serial 2347  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bender, J.B.; Shulman, S.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Reports of zoonotic disease outbreaks associated with animal exhibits and availability of recommendations for preventing zoonotic disease transmission from animals to people in such settings Type Journal Article
  Year 2004 Publication Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association Abbreviated Journal J Am Vet Med Assoc  
  Volume 224 Issue 7 Pages 1105-1109  
  Keywords Animal Diseases/epidemiology/transmission; Animals; Animals, Zoo; Disease Notification; Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control/statistics & numerical data/veterinary; Humans; Medline; United States/epidemiology; Zoonoses  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To assess the number of zoonotic disease outbreaks associated with animal exhibits and identify published recommendations for preventing zoonotic disease transmission from animals to people in exhibit settings. DESIGN: Literature review and survey of state public health veterinarians and state epidemiologists. PROCEDURE: MEDLINE and agriculture databases were searched from 1966 through 2000. Retrieved references and additional resources provided by the authors were reviewed. A survey was sent to state public health veterinarians and state epidemiologists to determine whether their states had written recommendations or guidelines for controlling zoonotic diseases in animal exhibition venues, whether their states maintained a listing of animal exhibitors in the state, and whether they had any information on recent outbreaks involving animals in exhibitions. RESULTS: 11 published outbreaks were identified. These outbreaks occurred in a variety of settings including petting zoos, farms, and a zoological park. An additional episode involving exposure to a potentially rabid bear required extensive public health resources. A survey of state public health veterinarians identified 16 additional unpublished outbreaks or incidents. Most states did not have written recommendations or guidelines for controlling zoonotic diseases or any means to disseminate educational materials to animal exhibitors. CONCLUSIONS: Recent outbreaks of zoonotic diseases associated with contact with animals in exhibition venues highlight concerns for disease transmission to public visitors. Only a handful of states have written guidelines for preventing zoonotic disease transmission in animal exhibition venues, and published recommendations currently available focus on preventing enteric diseases and largely do not address other zoonotic diseases or prevention of bite wounds.  
  Address Veterinary Population Medicine Department, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, St Paul, MN 55108, USA.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2004/04/13  
  ISSN (up) 0003-1488 (Print) 0003-1488 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes MEDLINE, VET-CD and BEAST-CD searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 872 Serial 2357  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cook, J.L.; Cook, C.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title What is the evidence? Forelimb lameness in a dog--evidence-based decision making Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association Abbreviated Journal J Am Vet Med Assoc  
  Volume 235 Issue 9 Pages 1053-1055  
  Keywords Animals; Arthroscopy/veterinary; Dog Diseases/diagnosis/surgery; Dogs; Evidence-Based Medicine; Forelimb/pathology; Fractures, Bone/diagnosis/surgery/veterinary; Lameness, Animal/diagnosis; Male  
  Abstract  
  Address Comparative Orthopaedic Laboratory, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211, USA. cookjl@missouri.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2009/11/03  
  ISSN (up) 0003-1488 (Print) 0003-1488 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 439 Serial 2382  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cook, J.L.; Cook, C.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title What is the evidence? Intervertebral disk surgery Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association Abbreviated Journal J Am Vet Med Assoc  
  Volume 237 Issue 1 Pages 49-51  
  Keywords Animals; Decompression, Surgical/veterinary; Dog Diseases/diagnosis; Dogs; Intervertebral Disc Displacement/surgery/veterinary; Male; Spinal Fusion/veterinary  
  Abstract  
  Address Comparative Orthopaedic Laboratory, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211, USA. cookjl@missouri.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2010/07/02  
  ISSN (up) 0003-1488 (Print) 0003-1488 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 440 Serial 2383  
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Author Fajt, V.R.; Van House, A.M.; Honnas, C.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title What is the evidence? In horses with septic bursitis for which the organism has not yet been identified, is IV regional perfusion with amikacin or cefotaxime likely to be effective? Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association Abbreviated Journal J Am Vet Med Assoc  
  Volume 236 Issue 6 Pages 636-638  
  Keywords Amikacin/administration & dosage/therapeutic use; Animals; Anti-Bacterial Agents/administration & dosage/therapeutic use; Arthritis, Infectious/diagnosis/drug therapy/veterinary; Bursitis/diagnosis/drug therapy/veterinary; Cefotaxime/administration & dosage/therapeutic use; Evidence-Based Practice; Female; Horse Diseases/diagnosis/drug therapy; Horses; Lameness, Animal/diagnosis  
  Abstract  
  Address Departments of Veterinary Physiology and Pharmacology, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843, USA. vfajt@cvm.tamu.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2010/03/17  
  ISSN (up) 0003-1488 (Print) 0003-1488 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed and proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the American Association of Equine Practitioners searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 445 Serial 2414  
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Author Frank, D.; Beauchamp, G.; Palestrini, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Systematic review of the use of pheromones for treatment of undesirable behavior in cats and dogs Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association Abbreviated Journal J Am Vet Med Assoc  
  Volume 236 Issue 12 Pages 1308-1316  
  Keywords Animal Husbandry; Animals; Behavior, Animal/drug effects; Cats; Dogs; Pheromones/pharmacology  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To systematically review the scientific literature to identify, assess the quality of, and determine outcomes of studies conducted to evaluate the use of pheromones for treatment of undesirable behavior in cats and dogs. DESIGN: Systematic review. STUDY POPULATION: Reports of prospective studies published from January 1998 through December 2008. PROCEDURES: The MEDLINE and CAB Abstracts databases were searched with the following key terms: dog OR dogs OR canine OR cat OR cats OR feline AND pheromone OR synthetic pheromone OR facial pheromone OR appeasing pheromone. A date limit was set from 1998 through 2008. Identified reports for dogs (n = 7) and cats (7) were systematically reviewed. RESULTS: Studies provided insufficient evidence of the effectiveness of feline facial pheromone for management of idiopathic cystitis or calming cats during catheterization and lack of support for reducing stress in hospitalized cats. Only 1 study yielded sufficient evidence that dog-appeasing pheromone reduces fear or anxiety in dogs during training. Six studies yielded insufficient evidence of the effectiveness of dog-appeasing pheromone for treatment of noise phobia (2 reports), travel-related problems, fear or anxiety in the veterinary clinic, and stress- and fear-related behavior in shelter dogs as well as vocalizing and house soiling in recently adopted puppies. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: 11 of the 14 reports reviewed provided insufficient evidence and 1 provided lack of support for effectiveness of pheromones for the treatment of undesirable behavior in cats and dogs.  
  Address Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Veterinaire, Faculte de Medecine Veterinaire, Universite de Montreal, St-Hyacinthe, QC J2S 7C6, Canada.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2010/06/17  
  ISSN (up) 0003-1488 (Print) 0003-1488 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes MEDLINE and CAB Abstracts searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 669 Serial 2422  
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Author Franklin, S.P.; Cook, J.L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title What is the evidence? Surgical treatment of large dogs with hip joint osteoarthritis Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association Abbreviated Journal J Am Vet Med Assoc  
  Volume 238 Issue 4 Pages 440-442  
  Keywords Animals; Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip/veterinary; Dog Diseases/therapy; Dogs; Evidence-Based Medicine/methods/standards; Female; Hip Dysplasia, Canine/surgery; Hip Prosthesis/veterinary; Lameness, Animal; Osteoarthritis/therapy/veterinary  
  Abstract  
  Address Comparative Orthopaedic Laboratory College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211, USA. franklinsa@missouri.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2011/02/16  
  ISSN (up) 0003-1488 (Print) 0003-1488 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 448 Serial 2423  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author McKenzie, B.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title What is the evidence? There is only very weak clinical trial evidence to support the use of glucosamine and chondroitin supplements for osteoarthritis in dogs Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association Abbreviated Journal J Am Vet Med Assoc  
  Volume 237 Issue 12 Pages 1382-1383  
  Keywords Animals; Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/adverse effects/therapeutic use; Chondroitin/therapeutic use; Dog Diseases/diagnosis/drug therapy; Dogs; Evidence-Based Medicine; Glucosamine/therapeutic use; Male; Osteoarthritis, Hip/diagnosis/drug therapy/veterinary  
  Abstract  
  Address Adobe Animal Hospital, 4470 El Camino Real, Los Altos, CA 94022, USA. mckenzievmd@gmail.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2010/12/16  
  ISSN (up) 0003-1488 (Print) 0003-1488 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 467 Serial 2501  
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Author O'Connor, A.M.; Wellman, N.G.; Rice, M.; Funk, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Characteristics of clinical trials assessing antimicrobial treatment of bovine respiratory disease, 1970-2005 Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association Abbreviated Journal J Am Vet Med Assoc  
  Volume 237 Issue 6 Pages 701-705  
  Keywords Animals; Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use; Cattle; Cattle Diseases/drug therapy; Respiratory Tract Diseases/drug therapy/veterinary; Time Factors  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate reporting of key study design features and study outcomes in trials of antimicrobial treatment of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) in North American feedlots. DESIGN: Systematic review. SAMPLE POPULATION: 29 manuscripts (41 studies) reporting antimicrobial treatment of BRD in North American feedlot cattle. PROCEDURES: A search of the electronic citation databases AGRICOLA, Commonwealth Agricultural Bureau, and PubMed was conducted to identify relevant manuscripts published between 1970 and 2005. Key study design features were extracted by 2 reviewers. RESULTS: 12 of 29 (41%) manuscripts did not disclose a funding source, and 21 (72%) had an author clearly identified as an employee of a pharmaceutical company. At the study level, 36 of 41 (88%) studies reported a random method of treatment allocation, 9 (22%) described the method of allocation sequence generation, 20 (49%) reported that study investigators were blinded to treatment, and 3 (7%) included a study size justification. No studies described the null hypothesis to be tested. Thirty-seven (90%) studies reported at least 3 outcomes; the largest number of outcomes reported was 14. It was not possible to conduct the statistical analysis as originally planned because it was not possible to discern the primary outcome for the majority of studies. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Many studies did not report key study design features that would assist critical evaluation by readers. It was not clear whether the studies failed to use the design features or failed to report them. Several nondesign features, such as reporting of the null hypothesis, a primary outcome, and sample size rationale, represent relatively new standards for reporting; however, reporting these features would substantially clarify the study objective.  
  Address Department of Veterinary Diagnostic and Production Animal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50010, USA. oconnor@iastate.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2010/09/16  
  ISSN (up) 0003-1488 (Print) 0003-1488 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes AGRICOLA, CAB (Abstracts?) and PubMed searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 737 Serial 2535  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Owens, S.L.; Parnell, N.K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title What is the evidence? Portosystemic shunt in a dog Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association Abbreviated Journal J Am Vet Med Assoc  
  Volume 238 Issue 7 Pages 859-861  
  Keywords Animals; Anti-Ulcer Agents/therapeutic use; Diet/veterinary; Dog Diseases/pathology/therapy; Dogs; Evidence-Based Medicine; Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage/prevention & control; Hepatic Encephalopathy/therapy/veterinary; Lactulose/administration & dosage/therapeutic use; Liver Diseases/congenital/therapy/veterinary; Male; Omeprazole/therapeutic use; Portal System/abnormalities; Stomach Ulcer/prevention & control; Treatment Outcome  
  Abstract  
  Address Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA. sowens@purdue.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2011/04/02  
  ISSN (up) 0003-1488 (Print) 0003-1488 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes CAB Abstracts, PubMed and Veterinary Information Network (VIN) searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 478 Serial 2544  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Patronek, G.J.; Rauch, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Systematic review of comparative studies examining alternatives to the harmful use of animals in biomedical education Type Journal Article
  Year 2007 Publication Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association Abbreviated Journal J Am Vet Med Assoc  
  Volume 230 Issue 1 Pages 37-43  
  Keywords Animal Welfare; Animals; Clinical Competence; Education, Medical/methods/standards; Education, Veterinary/methods/standards; Humans; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Students; Students, Medical; Teaching/methods  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To systematically review the published literature for controlled studies comparing learning outcomes of traditional methods that require the terminal use of animals (eg, dissection, live-animal surgery, and live-animal laboratory demonstrations) with outcomes obtained with alternative teaching methods. DESIGN: Systematic review. STUDY POPULATION: Controlled studies published between 1996 and 2004. PROCEDURES: PubMed was searched with the following keywords, used alone and in combination: educational alternatives, nonlethal teaching methods, veterinary alternatives, medical education, and nonterminal animal use. Cited references of retrieved reports were reviewed to identify additional reports. Reports were selected for review only if a comparison group was included. RESULTS: 17 studies that were randomized controlled trials or nonrandomized trials that included a comparison group were identified. Five involved veterinary students, 3 involved medical students, 6 involved university undergraduate students, and 3 involved high school biology students. Sample size ranged from 14 to 283 students. Eleven studies appeared to be randomized, parallel-group trials, 4 involved comparative groups to which participants were not randomly assigned or for which the randomization process was not clear, 1 was a 2-period crossover study, and 1 involved a retrospective review of grades. In all 17 studies reviewed, results associated with the alternative method of instruction were not significantly different from or superior to results associated with the conventional method. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Although the number of controlled studies identified was small, the results seem to support more widespread adoption of alternative teaching methods in biomedical education.  
  Address Center for Animals and Public Policy, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University, North Grafton, MA 01536, USA.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2007/01/04  
  ISSN (up) 0003-1488 (Print) 0003-1488 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 745 Serial 2547  
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