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Author Berry, A.; Borgi, M.; Francia, N.; Alleva, E.; Cirulli, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Use of assistance and therapy dogs for children with autism spectrum disorders: a critical review of the current evidence Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal J Altern Complement Med  
  Volume 19 Issue 2 Pages 73-80  
  Keywords Animal Assisted Therapy; Animals; Child; Child Development Disorders, Pervasive/therapy; Dogs; Humans; Language; Social Behavior  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are characterized by deficits in social reciprocity and communication, and by unusually restricted, repetitive behaviors. Intervention strategies based on the exploitation of the emotional aspects of human-dog relationships hold the potential to overcome the difficulty of subjects with ASD to relate and interact effectively with others, targeting core symptoms of this disorder. METHODS: This review summarizes the results of six published studies on the effects of brief interactions with dogs and the effects of introducing dogs in families with a child diagnosed with ASD, with an emphasis on social behaviors and language use. Furthermore, the possible mechanisms responsible for the beneficial effects observed are discussed. CONCLUSIONS: Although the studies described here are encouraging, further research with better designs and using larger samples is needed to strengthen translation of such interventions to the clinic. In addition, potential applications of analyzing child-dog interactions are highlighted to screen for early signs of the disorder.  
  Address Section of Behavioral Neurosciences, Department of Cell Biology and Neurosciences, Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Rome, Italy.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2012/09/18  
  ISSN 1557-7708 (Electronic) 1075-5535 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, Google Scholar, ScienceDirect and ERIC searched Approved yes  
  Call Number (up) UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1083 Serial 2359  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Mitchell, R.M.; Medley, G.F.; Collins, M.T.; Schukken, Y.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A meta-analysis of the effect of dose and age at exposure on shedding of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) in experimentally infected calves and cows Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Epidemiology and Infection Abbreviated Journal Epidemiol Infect  
  Volume 140 Issue 2 Pages 231-246  
  Keywords Age Factors; Animals; Cattle; Cattle Diseases/epidemiology/microbiology/transmission; Disease Transmission, Infectious/veterinary; Feces/virology; Female; Models, Biological; Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis/isolation & purification; Paratuberculosis/epidemiology/microbiology/transmission  
  Abstract A meta-analysis was performed using all published and one unpublished long-term infection-challenge experiments to quantify the age- and dose-dependence of early and late shedding of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) in cattle. There were 194 animals from 17 studies that fulfilled the inclusion criteria, of which 173 received a known dose of MAP and 21 were exposed naturally. Results from parametric time-to-event models indicated that challenging older calves or using multiple-exposure experimental systems resulted in a smaller proportion and shorter duration of early shedding as well as slower transition to late shedding from latent compartments. Calves exposed naturally showed variable infection progression rates, not dissimilar to other infection routes. The log-normal distribution was most appropriate for modelling infection-progression events. The infection pattern revealed by the modelling allowed better understanding of low-grade endemicity of MAP in cattle, and the parameter estimates are the basis for future transmission dynamics modelling.  
  Address Quality Milk Production Services, Department of Population Medicine and Diagnostic Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA. rmm37@cornell.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2011/04/29  
  ISSN 1469-4409 (Electronic) 0950-2688 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed searched Approved yes  
  Call Number (up) UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1084 Serial 2513  
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Author O'Connor, A.M.; Coetzee, J.F.; da Silva, N.; Wang, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A mixed treatment comparison meta-analysis of antibiotic treatments for bovine respiratory disease Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Preventive Veterinary Medicine Abbreviated Journal Prev Vet Med  
  Volume 110 Issue 2 Pages 77-87  
  Keywords Animals; Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use; Bovine Respiratory Disease Complex/drug therapy; Cattle; Models, Statistical; North America; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Risk Assessment; Treatment Outcome; Anti-Bacterial Agents  
  Abstract In this publication we use mixed treatment comparison meta-analysis to compare the efficacy of antibiotic treatments for bovine respiratory disease in beef cattle. Studies were eligible for the meta-analysis if they were publically available and reported the assessment of antibiotic protocols registered for use in the United States (US) for bovine respiratory disease (BRD) in beef cattle and were conducted in North America. Three electronic databases, the proceedings of two bovine specific conferences, pharmaceutical company web sites and the US Food and Drug Administration website were searched to identify relevant trials. The network of evidence used in the analysis contained 194 trial arms from 93 trials. Of the 93 trials there were 8 with three arms. The network of evidence contained information for 12 antibiotics. The output from the analysis provided information about the risk ratio comparing all possible treatments for BRD including comparisons based only on indirect data. The output also included a relative ranking of the treatments and estimates of the probability that an antibiotic protocol was the worst treatment option.  
  Address Department of Veterinary Diagnostics and Production Animal Medicine, Iowa State University College of Veterinary Medicine, 1600 South 16th Street, Ames, IA 50011, United States. Electronic address: oconnor@iastate.edu.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2013/01/02  
  ISSN 1873-1716 (Electronic) 0167-5877 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes AGRICOLA, CAB Abstracts and PubMed searched Approved yes  
  Call Number (up) UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1085 Serial 2530  
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Author Onono, J.O.; Wieland, B.; Rushton, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Productivity in different cattle production systems in Kenya Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Tropical Animal Health and Production Abbreviated Journal Trop Anim Health Prod  
  Volume 45 Issue 2 Pages 423-430  
  Keywords Animal Husbandry/economics; Animal Husbandry/methods; Animals; Cattle/growth & development; Cattle/physiology; Dairying/economics; Dairying/methods; Female; Kenya; Male; Models, Theoretical; Reference Values; Cattle  
  Abstract Cattle are kept as an important source of livelihood in many Kenyan farming households whilst also having cultural and social value. A review was undertaken to estimate productivity in the three main Kenyan cattle production systems: small-scale dairy and meat; small-scale dairy; and large-scale dairy and meat. Data on production parameters were collected through a systematic literature search of electronic databases for peer reviewed and grey literature. The parameters included were reproductive rates, mortality rates and yields. Prices for livestock and livestock products were estimated from markets. The data were used to estimate net output from cattle using the Livestock Productivity Efficiency Calculator (LPEC), a deterministic steady state model which measures productivity as net output per megajoule (MJ) of metabolisable energy (ME). The estimated net outputs per livestock unit year(-1) were USD 146.6, USD 215.1 and USD 84.8 in the large-scale dairy and meat, small-scale dairy and meat and small-scale dairy systems, respectively. Milk production contributed significantly to net output in all systems and was 91.8 % of total output in small-scale dairy. Cattle sales had the highest contribution to net output in large-scale dairy and meat system (45.1 %). Sensitivity analysis indicated that output was most affected by milk yield, age and weight at maturity and parturition rate. The productivity differences between the production systems call for more detailed research on the constraints to the production systems such as diseases, and to describe the benefits that farmers and society would obtain from disease control and improved management.  
  Address Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Veterinary Epidemiology and Public Health Group, Royal Veterinary College, Hawkshead Lane, AL97TA, Hatfield, UK. joshua.orungo@uonbi.ac.ke  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2012/07/24  
  ISSN 1573-7438 (Electronic) 0049-4747 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, Science Direct, CAB Direct (CAB Abstracts?) and Springer searched Approved yes  
  Call Number (up) UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1086 Serial 2542  
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Author Selby, A.; Smith-Osborne, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A systematic review of effectiveness of complementary and adjunct therapies and interventions involving equines Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Health Psychology Abbreviated Journal Health Psychol  
  Volume 32 Issue 4 Pages 418-432  
  Keywords Animal Assisted Therapy/methods; Animals; Chronic Disease/therapy; Combined Modality Therapy/methods; Complementary Therapies/methods; Horses; Humans; Psychotherapy/methods; Treatment Outcome  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: This systematic review examines the empirical literature in an emerging body of evidence for the effectiveness of biopsychosocial interventions involving equines across populations with chronic illness or health challenges. METHOD: Selected quantitative studies published in peer-reviewed journals were reviewed for inclusion; the gray literature and white papers were also explored. Population, Intervention, Comparison, and Outcome (PICO) criteria and Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) were applied to all studies. Fourteen full reports meeting a priori inclusion criteria were extracted from 103 studies accessed through 16 electronic databases and a hand search. Data were synthesized in relation to three research questions informing evidence-based practice. RESULTS: No randomized clinical trials were located. Two studies provided a moderate level of evidence for effectiveness. Nine studies demonstrated statistically significant positive effects. Three studies did not find significant psychosocial effects for the target group, although one found significant positive effects for the comparison group. CONCLUSION: In the aggregate, the evidence is promising in support of the effectiveness of complementary and adjunct interventions employing equines in the treatment of health challenges. Future studies are needed that utilize rigorous and creative designs, especially longitudinal studies and comparisons with established effective treatments.  
  Address Child and Family Guidance Centers, Plano, Texas, USA.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2012/08/15  
  ISSN 1930-7810 (Electronic) 0278-6133 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Academic Search Complete, Alt HealthWatch, CINAHL Plus, EBSCO Animals, E-Journals, ERIC, Health Source: Nursing/Academic Edition, MasterFILE Premier, MEDLINE, Professional Development Collection, PsycARTICLES, Psychology and Behavioral Sciences Collection, PsycINFO, PubMed, Social Work Abstracts, and TOPICsearch searched Approved yes  
  Call Number (up) UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1087 Serial 2592  
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Author Varela, N.P.; Dick, P.; Wilson, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Assessing the existing information on the efficacy of bovine vaccination against Escherichia coli O157:H7 – a systematic review and meta-analysis Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Zoonoses and Public Health Abbreviated Journal Zoonoses Public Health  
  Volume 60 Issue 4 Pages 253-268  
  Keywords Animals; Cattle; Cattle Diseases/microbiology; Cattle Diseases/prevention & control; Escherichia coli Infections/prevention & control; Escherichia coli Infections/veterinary; Escherichia coli O157/immunology; Escherichia coli Vaccines/immunology; Escherichia coli Vaccines  
  Abstract The objective of this study was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the existing information on the efficacy of commercial vaccination to reduce the prevalence of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in weaned cattle in beef feedlot finishing systems under commercial conditions. Currently, only two commercial vaccines exist, and thus, only publications reporting the use of vaccines targeting type III secreted proteins and/or siderophore receptor and porin proteins (SRP) were considered relevant. A total of 18 studies reporting 45 comparisons were included in this review. Meta-analyses were conducted variously on (i) pre-harvest outcomes, (ii) at-harvest outcomes and (iii) both pre-harvest and at-harvest outcomes combined. Overall, efficacy of vaccination was consistently observed. Efficacy and homogeneity of the results was demonstrated for the two-dose regimen, allowing us to conclude with confidence that the two-dose approach is efficacious. For pre-harvest outcomes and two-dose regimens, the odds ratios (OR) were 0.53 (95% CI = 0.45-0.62) for the two vaccines combined and 0.49 (95% CI = 0.40-0.60) for vaccine targeting type III secreted proteins. The test for heterogeneity among studies yielded a Q test P = 0.354 for the two vaccines combined and Q test P = 0.269 for the vaccine targeting type III secreted proteins, indicating homogeneity in both cases. For pre- and at-harvest outcomes combined and two-dose regimens, the odds ratios (OR) were 0.52 (95% CI = 0.44-0.61) for the two vaccines combined and 0.45 (95% CI = 0.34-0.60) for vaccine targeting type III secreted proteins. The test for heterogeneity among studies yielded a Q test P = 0.134 for the two vaccines combined indicating homogeneity and Q test P = 0.089 for the vaccine targeting type III secreted proteins indicating heterogeneity. Based on this meta-analysis, bovine vaccination appears to be an effective approach to the pre-harvest control of E. coli O157:H7.  
  Address Department of Population Medicine, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada Novometrix Research Inc., Moffat, ON, Canada.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2012/08/04  
  ISSN 1863-2378 (Electronic) 1863-1959 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, CAB (Abstracts?), AGRICOLA and Google Scholar searched Approved yes  
  Call Number (up) UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1088 Serial 2631  
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Author Metzler-Zebeli, B.U.; Zebeli, Q. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Cereal beta-glucan alters nutrient digestibility and microbial activity in the intestinal tract of pigs, and lower manure ammonia emission: A meta-analysis Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Journal of Animal Science Abbreviated Journal J Anim Sci  
  Volume 91 Issue 7 Pages 3188-3199  
  Keywords Ammonia/metabolism; Animal Feed/analysis; Animal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena; Animals; Cereals/chemistry; Diet/veterinary; Dietary Proteins/administration & dosage; Dietary Proteins/metabolism; Digestion; Fermentation; Intestines/metabolism; Manure/analysis; Polysaccharides/administration & dosage; Polysaccharides/metabolism; Sus scrofa/growth & development; Sus scrofa/physiology; beta-Glucans/administration & dosage; beta-Glucans/metabolism; Dietary Proteins; Manure; Polysaccharides; beta-Glucans; Ammonia; Pigs; Swine  
  Abstract Cereal beta-glucan may be detrimental in pig production because of negative effects on nutrient digestibility, but they may act as functional ingredients by stimulating the intestinal microbiota. This study primarily aimed to investigate relations between dietary beta-glucan and nutrient digestibility, intestinal fermentation, and manure NH3 emission in weaned, growing, and finishing pigs. Effects of dietary xylose, NDF, and CP, and pig's BW on animal responses were also evaluated. A meta-analytical approach, accounting for inter- and intra-experiment variations, was used to compute prediction models. Data from 26 studies including 107 different dietary treatments with appropriate dietary and physiological measurements were used to parameterize these models. Dietary beta-glucan concentration ranged from 0 to 6.7%. Increasing dietary beta-glucan reduced apparent ileal (AID) and total tract digestibility (ATTD) of CP and energy (R2 = 0.12 to 0.29; P < 0.05), whereas the ATTD of DM was reduced by 10% up to a threshold beta-glucan level of 3.5%, above which the response became asymptotic (R2 = 0.34; P < 0.01). Increasing dietary NDF content decreased ATTD of DM and energy, and increasing xylose concentration reduced ATTD of energy and CP (R2 = 0.24 to 0.85; P < 0.05). Broken-line model indicated that cecal total VFA and butyrate concentrations increased up to a threshold of 2.5 and 1.4% beta-glucan in the diet, respectively, above which these responses became asymptotic (R2 = 0.77 to 0.96; P < 0.05). Ileal butyrate was negatively and colonic iso-butyrate was positively linked to increasing beta-glucan concentration (R2 = 0.17 to 0.41; P < 0.05). Greater beta-glucan concentration were negatively related (R2 = 0.86; P < 0.01) to NH3 emission, indicating a reduction in NH3 emission by half with 6% beta-glucan. Backward elimination analysis indicated that greater BW of pigs counteracted (P < 0.05) the negative effect of beta-glucan on AID of CP and energy and ATTD of DM and CP. Pig's BW also enhanced effects of beta-glucan on cecal total VFA, colonic iso-butyrate, ileal butyrate, and NH3 emission (P < 0.05). Dietary CP level potentiated (P < 0.01) the beta-glucan effects on cecal total VFA, cecal butyrate, and colonic iso-butyrate. In conclusion, this study indicates that beta-glucan can stimulate cecal butyrate and ameliorate manure NH3 emission, thereby, decreasing nutrient digestibility. Because greater BW ameliorates beta-glucan effects, finishing diets may be formulated to contain more beta-glucan than weaner diets.  
  Address Clinic for Swine, University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2013/04/11  
  ISSN 1525-3163 (Electronic) 0021-8812 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, Google Scholar, Science Direct and Scopus searched Approved yes  
  Call Number (up) UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1089 Serial 2505  
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Author Klop, G.; Ellis, J.L.; Bannink, A.; Kebreab, E.; France, J.; Dijkstra, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Meta-analysis of factors that affect the utilization efficiency of phosphorus in lactating dairy cows Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Journal of Dairy Science Abbreviated Journal J Dairy Sci  
  Volume 96 Issue 6 Pages 3936-3949  
  Keywords Animal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena; Animals; Bayes Theorem; Cattle/metabolism; Dietary Fiber/administration & dosage; Dietary Proteins/administration & dosage; Digestion; Feces/chemistry; Female; Lactation/physiology; Milk/chemistry; Phosphorus/analysis; Phosphorus, Dietary/administration & dosage; Phosphorus, Dietary/metabolism; Phosphorus, Dietary/pharmacokinetics; Dietary Proteins; Phosphorus, Dietary; Phosphorus; Cattle  
  Abstract A meta-analysis investigation based on literature data was conducted to estimate the effect size of nutritional and animal factors on phosphorus (P) excretion in feces and concentrations of P in milk. Two data sets were created for statistical analysis: One to derive prediction equations for P in feces (25 studies; 130 treatments) and another for P in milk (19 studies; 94 treatments). Prediction equations were derived using mixed model regression analysis with a random effect for study, and equations were evaluated based on values for Bayesian information criterion (BIC), root mean square prediction error (RMSPE), and concordance correlation coefficient (CCC) statistics. In terms of RMSPE and CCC values, fecal P excretion was best predicted by P intake, where P in feces (g/d) = -3.8(+/-3.45) + 0.64(+/-0.038) x P intake (g/d) (RMSPE: 18.3%, CCC: 0.869). However, significant effects of crude protein [g/kg of dry matter (DM)], neutral detergent fiber (g/kg of DM), and milk yield (kg/d) on fecal P excretion were also found. Despite a lack of improvement in terms of RMSPE and CCC values, these parameters may still explain part of the variation in fecal P excretion. For milk P, expressed as a fraction of P intake, the following equation had the highest CCC and the lowest RMSPE value: P in milk as a fraction of P intake (g/g) = 0.42(+/-0.065) + 0.23(+/-0.018) x feed efficiency (i.e., fat- and protein-corrected milk yield/dry matter intake) – 0.11(+/-0.0199) x P in feed (g/kg of DM) (RMSPE: 19.7%; CCC: 0.761). Equations derived to predict fecal P as a fraction of P intake (g/g) or milk P content (g/kg) could not adequately explain the observed variation and did not perform well in terms of RMSPE and CCC values. Examination of the residuals showed that P balance was a seemingly confounding factor in some of the models. The results presented here can be used to estimate P in feces and milk based on commonly measured dietary and milk variables, but could also be used to guide development of mechanistic models on P metabolism in lactating dairy cattle. Factors to consider in future research and modeling efforts regarding efficiency of P use include the effects of dietary neutral detergent fiber, crude protein, starch, variation in P content of milk, and effects of P resorption from bone and body tissues during early lactation.  
  Address Animal Nutrition Group, Wageningen University, PO Box 338, 6700 AH Wageningen, the Netherlands. Electronic address: geronda.klop@wur.nl.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2013/04/10  
  ISSN 1525-3198 (Electronic) 0022-0302 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Web of Science searched Approved yes  
  Call Number (up) UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1090 Serial 2472  
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Author Belo, V.S.; Struchiner, C.J.; Werneck, G.L.; Barbosa, D.S.; de Oliveira, R.B.; Neto, R.G.; da Silva, E.S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A systematic review and meta-analysis of the factors associated with Leishmania infantum infection in dogs in Brazil Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Veterinary Parasitology Abbreviated Journal Vet Parasitol  
  Volume 195 Issue 1-2 Pages 1-13  
  Keywords Dogs  
  Abstract The risk factors associated with canine visceral leishmaniosis (CVL) in Brazil are unclear and controversial. The objectives of this systematic review and meta-analysis were to identify the best evidence available in this field and to determine the gaps in existing knowledge. Literature searches were carried out using four databases, the reference lists within articles, and references provided by experts in the field. Theoretical discussions or separate and independent meta-analyses of p-values or of effect sizes were used to pool information about each variable. Thirty-six articles were selected for detailed review, including 31 cross-sectional, two ecological and three cohort studies. The variables showing significant association with CVL were short hair, purebred, peri-domestic restricted (as compared with domestic-restricted dogs), and presence of green areas adjacent to home. The occurrence of CVL was also associated with the presence of domestic fowl in the home environment, with free dogs (as compared with restrained dogs), with male gender and with dogs >1 or 2 years of age, although these associations were not statistically significant. Due to the small number of publications, consistent results could not be obtained concerning the role of other factors. Most studies did not describe the criteria of eligibility and the process of selection of participants in sufficient detail and employed only one diagnostic test as proof of infection. Few studies controlled for confounding variables. No statistical evidence of publication bias was detected, but a great deal of information contained in the primary articles was lost because the results were not adequately described. The results of this review contribute to a better understanding of CVL and should assist in optimizing the development and implementation of control policies. Continuous actions, prioritizing dogs at higher risk and areas with higher abundance of green vegetation, together with policies to promote responsible dog ownership are mandatory. Problems concerning study design and data analysis described in the present study need to be taken into consideration in future studies. These must follow clear procedures to select participants and utilize standardized, valid and reliable diagnostic methods. The development of multivariate models and the use of the STROBE statement for description of the results should also be encouraged. Further research should investigate the patterns identified and prioritize CVL-related factors that have not been fully recognized or elucidated. Finally, ecological and cohort studies of CVL and investigations in other countries of Latin America are urgently required.  
  Address Escola Nacional de Saude Publica Sergio Arouca, Rua Leopoldo Bulhoes no. 1480, Manguinhos, 21041-210 Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil. Electronic address: vinicius.belo@terra.com.br.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2013/04/09  
  ISSN 1873-2550 (Electronic) 0304-4017 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, LILACS, CAPES (theses and dissertations published by Brazilian academic institutions) and Google Scholar searched Approved yes  
  Call Number (up) UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1091 Serial 2356  
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Author Vengust, M. url  openurl
  Title Hypercapnic respiratory acidosis: a protective or harmful strategy for critically ill newborn foals? Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Canadian Journal of Veterinary Research Abbreviated Journal Can J Vet Res  
  Volume 76 Issue 4 Pages 275-280  
  Keywords Horses  
  Abstract This paper reviews both the beneficial and adverse effects of permissive hypercapnic respiratory acidosis in critically ill newborn foals. It has been shown that partial carbon dioxide pressure (PCO2) above the traditional safe range (hypercapnia), has beneficial effects on the physiology of the respiratory, cardiovascular, and nervous system in neonates. In human neonatal critical care medicine permissive hypercapnic acidosis is generally well-tolerated by patients and is more beneficial to their wellbeing than normal carbon dioxide (CO2) pressure or normocapnia. Even though adverse effects of hypercapnia have been reported, especially in patients with central nervous system pathology and/or chronic infection, critical care clinicians often artificially increase PCO2 to take advantage of its positive effects on compromised neonate tissues. This is referred to as therapeutic hypercapnia. Hypercapnic respiratory acidosis is common in critically ill newborn foals and has traditionally been considered as not beneficial. A search of online scientific databases was conducted to survey the literature on the effects of hypercapnia in neonates, with emphasis on newborn foals. The dynamic status of safety levels of PCO2 and data on the effectiveness of different carbon dioxide levels are not available for newborn foals and should be scientifically determined. Presently, permissive hypercapnia should be implemented or tolerated cautiously in compromised newborn foals and its use should be based on relevant data from adult horses and other species.  
  Address Veterinary Faculty, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana SI-1115, Slovenia. modest.vengust@vf.uni-lj.si  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2013/04/02  
  ISSN 0830-9000 (Print) 0830-9000 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes MEDLINE , CAB Direct (CAB Abstracts?), AGRICOLA and Science Citation Index Expanded searched Approved yes  
  Call Number (up) UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1092 Serial 2632  
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Author Stamm, M.; Wehrend, A. url  openurl
  Title [Coat changes in castrated bitches – a review of the literature] Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Tierarztliche Praxis. Ausgabe K, Kleintiere/Heimtiere Abbreviated Journal Tierarztl Prax Ausg K Kleintiere Heimtiere  
  Volume 41 Issue 1 Pages 47-52  
  Keywords Dogs  
  Abstract OBJECT: Literature on veterinary medicine was searched for information on coat changes in castrated bitches. The data obtained was evaluated according to criteria of evidence-based veterinary medicine, to gain an objective basis for the evaluation of this undesired spaying-induced effect. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The literature search was carried out via the search function of PubMed and of the “Deutsche Nationalbibliothek” (DNB). Furthermore, German journals were surveyed for relevant papers. RESULTS: A total of 16 publications concerning the subject were found: ten expert opinions, three case series and three cohort studies. CONCLUSION: Publications on “coat changes in castrated bitches” are rare. The contemporary literature is predominantly comprised of expert opinions and is therefore of little evidentiary value. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Because coat changes following spaying in bitches are often described, dog owners should be informed about these possible secondary effects after spaying. Analysis of frequency and promotive factors with high evidentiary value are still lacking. Consequently, it is difficult or impossible to predict the individual risk of a dog developing coat changes.  
  Address Tierarztliche Klinik fur Kleintiere, Dr. Kuhn Dr. Schmidt, Carl-Benz-Strasse 2, 04451 Panitzsch. stamm@tierklinik-panitzsch.de  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language German Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2013/02/14  
  ISSN 1434-1239 (Print) 1434-1239 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed and Deutschen Nationalbibliothek searched Approved yes  
  Call Number (up) UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1093 Serial 2606  
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Author Reyher, K.K.; Haine, D.; Dohoo, I.R.; Revie, C.W. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Examining the effect of intramammary infections with minor mastitis pathogens on the acquisition of new intramammary infections with major mastitis pathogens--a systematic review and meta-analysis Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Journal of Dairy Science Abbreviated Journal J Dairy Sci  
  Volume 95 Issue 11 Pages 6483-6502  
  Keywords Animals; Cattle; Corynebacterium; Corynebacterium Infections/veterinary; Female; Mammary Glands, Animal/microbiology; Mastitis, Bovine/etiology/microbiology; Risk Factors; Staphylococcal Infections/veterinary; Staphylococcus aureus; Streptococcal Infections/veterinary; Streptococcus; Streptococcus agalactiae  
  Abstract Major mastitis pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus uberis, Streptococcus dysgalactiae, and the coliforms are usually considered more virulent and damaging to the udder than minor mastitis pathogens such as Corynebacterium bovis and coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS). The current literature contains several studies detailing analyses with conflicting results as to whether intramammary infection (IMI) with the minor pathogens decreases, increases, or has no effect on the risk of a quarter acquiring a new intramammary infection (NIMI) with a major pathogen. To investigate the available scientific evidence regarding the effect of IMI with minor pathogens on the acquisition of NIMI with major pathogens, a systematic review and meta-analysis were conducted. The total extant English- and French-language literature in electronic databases was searched and all publications cited by relevant papers were investigated. Results from 68 studies were extracted from 38 relevant papers. Random-effects models were used to investigate the effects of CNS and C. bovis on acquisition of new IMI with any of the major pathogens, as well as individually for the minor pathogens and Staph. aureus. Significant heterogeneity among studies exists, some of which could be accounted for by using meta-regression. Overall, observational studies showed no effect, whereas challenge studies showed strong and significant protective effects, specifically when major pathogens were introduced into the mammary gland via methods bypassing the teat end. Underlying risk can account for several unmeasured factors, and studies with higher underlying risk found more protective effects of minor pathogens. Larger doses of challenge organisms reduced the protective effect of minor pathogens, and studies with more stringent diagnostic criteria for pathogen IMI identified less protection. Smaller studies (those utilizing fewer than 40 cows) also showed a greater protective effect than larger studies.  
  Address Canadian Bovine Mastitis Research Network, C.P. 5000, St-Hyacinthe, Quebec, J2S 7C6, Canada. kreyher@upei.ca  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2012/09/18  
  ISSN 1525-3198 (Electronic) 0022-0302 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, CAB Abstracts, AGRICOLA and Google Scholar searched Approved yes  
  Call Number (up) UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1094 Serial 2572  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Sannmann, I.; Arlt, S.; Heuwieser, W. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A critical evaluation of diagnostic methods used to identify dairy cows with acute post-partum metritis in the current literature Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Journal of Dairy Research Abbreviated Journal J Dairy Res  
  Volume 79 Issue 4 Pages 436-444  
  Keywords Acute Disease; Animals; Body Temperature; Cattle; Cattle Diseases/diagnosis; Digital Rectal Examination/veterinary; Endometritis/diagnosis/microbiology/veterinary; Female; Puerperal Disorders/diagnosis/veterinary; Vaginal Discharge/veterinary; Veterinary Medicine/methods  
  Abstract The overall objective of this study was to investigate how relevant research publications address the validity of diagnostic methods for acute puerperal metritis (APM) in dairy cows, a disease commonly treated with antibiotic drugs. Therefore, a literature search was conducted in Journal of Dairy Science, Theriogenology, Animal Reproduction Science and The Veterinary Journal utilizing the ScienceDirect database. The search revealed 259 articles addressing APM. After applying exclusion criteria, a total of 48 trials remained. It was determined whether the author gave a clear definition of APM, the time of diagnosis relative to calving, and the person who performed the diagnosis. Studies were checked for the presence of definitions of possible findings, thresholds, and test characteristics of the methods used. Overall 9 different diagnostic methods were employed. On average 2.5 +/- 1.75 diagnostic methods were used in a study. References to support the use of the diagnostic methods were provided in 10 of 48 articles (20.8%). Vaginal discharge, transrectal palpation and rectal temperature were examined in 39, 22, and 21 of the studies, respectively. Thresholds for diagnostic tests and test characteristics were mentioned in 6 and 3 of the 48 articles, respectively. Based on this systematic review of 48 research papers the evidence supporting the use of the diagnostic methods to identify cows with APM has either been not reported or is weak. In conclusion, the reporting of the diagnostic methods to identify cows with APM needs to be improved and further high-quality research is necessary to improve diagnostic performance of the methods employed.  
  Address Clinic for Animal Reproduction, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Freie Universitat Berlin, Berlin, Germany.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2012/09/12  
  ISSN 1469-7629 (Electronic) 0022-0299 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Science Direct searched – articles from four journals as convenience sample Approved yes  
  Call Number (up) UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1095 Serial 2590  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Wilhelm, B.; Rajic, A.; Parker, S.; Waddell, L.; Sanchez, J.; Fazil, A.; Wilkins, W.; McEwen, S.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Assessment of the efficacy and quality of evidence for five on-farm interventions for Salmonella reduction in grow-finish swine: a systematic review and meta-analysis Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Preventive Veterinary Medicine Abbreviated Journal Prev Vet Med  
  Volume 107 Issue 1-2 Pages 1-20  
  Keywords Animal Husbandry/methods/standards; Animals; Canada; Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control/veterinary; Feces/microbiology; Odds Ratio; Salmonella/isolation & purification; Salmonella Infections, Animal/microbiology/prevention & control; Swine; Swine Diseases/microbiology/prevention & control; Pigs  
  Abstract Five on-farm practices for reduction of Salmonella shedding or sero-prevalence in grow-finish swine were selected through scoping study and expert consultation. Specific examples were selected based on supporting evidence from at least one controlled trial (CT), and availability to Canadian swine producers. Efficacy was evaluated using systematic review and meta-analysis (SR-MA) methodology. A modified Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, and Evaluation (GRADE) approach was applied to assess the quality of evidence for each intervention, and a 'summary of findings' table was developed to present findings 'at-a-glance'. MA of the small dataset of CTs investigating feeding meal, and measuring serology, yielded a significant summary estimate of efficacy (odds ratio (OR)=0.21; 95% confidence intervals (CI): 0.14, 0.31) with non-significant heterogeneity (P>0.10). MA of the dataset investigating inclusion of organic acids in the ration, measuring serology, yielded a significant summary estimate with significant heterogeneity across studies (P<0.001, I(2)=91%) precluding presentation of a single summary estimate; a range of results were reported (OR Range: 28 (1.6, 498); 0.07 (CI: 0.042, 0.33)). Pen disinfection between batches of finishers was studied in one large CT measuring both fecal culture (OR 0.84 (0.68, 1.1)) and serology (OR 0.48 (0.40, 0.58)) outcomes. The dataset investigating Salmonella spp. vaccination contained inconsistent findings (OR Range: 4.5 (1.3, 15); 0.07 (0.008, 0.68)), with significant heterogeneity across studies (P=0.005, I(2)=82), assessed measuring fecal culture. MA of the dataset investigating inclusion of in-feed tetracyclines yielded a significant OR indicating a potential harmful effect, measuring fecal culture, (OR Range: 14 (1.9, 108); 1.0 (0.43, 2.5)) with significant heterogeneity (P=0.003, I(2)=82%) across studies, suggesting some potential for withdrawal of in-feed tetracyclines to reduce Salmonella shedding. Therefore our ranking of intervention efficacy is: feeding meal>inclusion of acids in ration, feeder pen disinfection or Salmonella spp. vaccination>in-feed tetrayclines. Study design characteristics increasing risk of bias, including failure to justify sample size (19 of 31 studies) and failure to report random or systematic sampling (13 of 31 studies), resulted in modified GRADE evidence rankings of 'low' for these interventions. This suggests that further research is likely to affect our findings. Field CTs investigating herd-level interventions with measurements at the herd- and individual-levels are recommended. Overall, SR-MA was a useful approach for ranking efficacy, and GRADE offered a transparent method for ranking quality of evidence, although both were limited by the small number of comparable studies available.  
  Address Laboratory for Foodborne Zoonoses, Public Health Agency of Canada, 160 Research Lane, Guelph, Ontario N1G 5B2, Canada. bwilhelm@uoguelph.ca  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2012/08/28  
  ISSN 1873-1716 (Electronic) 0167-5877 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes AGRICOLA, Web of Knowledge (Web of Science?), PubMed and CAB Abstracts searched Approved yes  
  Call Number (up) UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1096 Serial 2643  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Poppy, G.D.; Rabiee, A.R.; Lean, I.J.; Sanchez, W.K.; Dorton, K.L.; Morley, P.S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A meta-analysis of the effects of feeding yeast culture produced by anaerobic fermentation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on milk production of lactating dairy cows Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Journal of Dairy Science Abbreviated Journal J Dairy Sci  
  Volume 95 Issue 10 Pages 6027-6041  
  Keywords Anaerobiosis/physiology; Animal Feed; Animal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena/physiology; Animals; Cattle/metabolism/physiology; Diet/veterinary; Female; Fermentation/physiology; Lactation/physiology; Saccharomyces cerevisiae/metabolism; Saccharomyces cerevisiae Proteins/metabolism; Cattle  
  Abstract The purpose of this study was to use meta-analytic methods to estimate the effect of a commercially available yeast culture product on milk production and other production measures in lactating dairy cows using a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Sixty-one research publications (published journal articles, published abstracts, and technical reports) were identified through a review of literature provided by the manufacturer and a search of published literature using 6 search engines. Thirty-six separate studies with 69 comparisons met the criteria for inclusion in the meta-analysis. The fixed-effect meta-analysis showed substantial heterogeneity for milk yield, energy-corrected milk, 3.5% fat-corrected milk, milk fat yield, and milk protein yield. Sub-group analysis of the data showed much less heterogeneity in peer-reviewed studies versus non-peer-reviewed abstracts and technical reports, and tended to show higher, but not significantly different, treatment effects. A random-effects meta-analysis showed estimated raw mean differences between treated and untreated cattle reported in peer-reviewed publications of 1.18 kg/d [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.55 to 1.81], 1.61 kg/d (95% CI: 0.92 to 2.29), and 1.65 kg/d (95% CI: 0.97 to 2.34) for milk yield, 3.5% fat-corrected milk, and energy-corrected milk, respectively. Milk fat yield and milk protein yield for peer-reviewed studies showed an increase in the raw mean difference of 0.06 kg/d (95% CI: 0.01 to 0.10) and 0.03 kg/d (95% CI: 0.00 to 0.05), respectively. Estimated raw mean dry matter intake of the peer-reviewed studies during early lactation (<70 d in milk) and not-early lactation were 0.62 kg/d (95% CI: 0.21 to 1.02) and a decrease of 0.78 kg/d (95% CI: -1.36 to -0.21), respectively. These findings provide strong evidence that this commercially available yeast culture product provides significant improvement in several important milk production outcomes as evaluated in production settings typical for commercial dairies in North America. Utilizing meta-analytic methods to study the complete breadth of information relating to a specific treatment by studying multiple overcomes of all eligible studies can reduce the uncertainty often seen in small individual studies designed without sufficient power to detect differences in treatments.  
  Address Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523, USA. gpoppy@diamondv.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2012/08/28  
  ISSN 1525-3198 (Electronic) 0022-0302 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, Google Scholar, AGRICOLA, ScienceDirect, Scirus, and CAB (Abstracts?) searched Approved yes  
  Call Number (up) UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1097 Serial 2557  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Batchelor, D.J.; Devauchelle, P.; Elliott, J.; Elwood, C.M.; Freiche, V.; Gualtieri, M.; Hall, E.J.; Den Hertog, E.; Neiger, R.; Peeters, D.; Roura, X.; Savary-Bataille, K.; German, A.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Mechanisms, causes, investigation and management of vomiting disorders in cats: a literature review Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery Abbreviated Journal J Feline Med Surg  
  Volume 15 Issue 4 Pages 237-265  
  Keywords Cats  
  Abstract Vomiting is a common presenting complaint in feline practice. This article differs from previous reviews in that it is an evidence-based review of the mechanisms, causes, investigation and management of vomiting in the domestic cat. Published evidence was reviewed, and then used to make recommendations for clinical assessment, diagnosis, antiemetic drug treatment, dietary management and monitoring of cats presenting with vomiting. The strength of the evidence on which recommendations are made (and areas where evidence is lacking for cats) has been highlighted throughout.  
  Address School of Veterinary Science, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2013/02/14  
  ISSN 1532-2750 (Electronic) 1098-612X (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, CAB Direct (CAB Abstracts?), Google Scholar and Web of Science searched Approved yes  
  Call Number (up) UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1098 Serial 2351  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Rutten, C.J.; Velthuis, A.G.; Steeneveld, W.; Hogeveen, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Invited review: sensors to support health management on dairy farms Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Journal of Dairy Science Abbreviated Journal J Dairy Sci  
  Volume 96 Issue 4 Pages 1928-1952  
  Keywords Cattle  
  Abstract Since the 1980s, efforts have been made to develop sensors that measure a parameter from an individual cow. The development started with individual cow recognition and was followed by sensors that measure the electrical conductivity of milk and pedometers that measure activity. The aim of this review is to provide a structured overview of the published sensor systems for dairy health management. The development of sensor systems can be described by the following 4 levels: (I) techniques that measure something about the cow (e.g., activity); (II) interpretations that summarize changes in the sensor data (e.g., increase in activity) to produce information about the cow's status (e.g., estrus); (III) integration of information where sensor information is supplemented with other information (e.g., economic information) to produce advice (e.g., whether to inseminate a cow or not); and (IV) the farmer makes a decision or the sensor system makes the decision autonomously (e.g., the inseminator is called). This review has structured a total of 126 publications describing 139 sensor systems and compared them based on the 4 levels. The publications were published in the Thomson Reuters (formerly ISI) Web of Science database from January 2002 until June 2012 or in the proceedings of 3 conferences on precision (dairy) farming in 2009, 2010, and 2011. Most studies concerned the detection of mastitis (25%), fertility (33%), and locomotion problems (30%), with fewer studies (16%) related to the detection of metabolic problems. Many studies presented sensor systems at levels I and II, but none did so at levels III and IV. Most of the work for mastitis (92%) and fertility (75%) is done at level II. For locomotion (53%) and metabolism (69%), more than half of the work is done at level I. The performance of sensor systems varies based on the choice of gold standards, algorithms, and test sizes (number of farms and cows). Studies on sensor systems for mastitis and estrus have shown that sensor systems are brought to a higher level; however, the need to improve detection performance still exists. Studies on sensor systems for locomotion problems have shown that the search continues for the most appropriate indicators, sensor techniques, and gold standards. Studies on metabolic problems show that it is still unclear which indicator reflects best the metabolic problems that should be detected. No systems with integrated decision support models have been found.  
  Address Department of Farm Animal Health, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, 3584 CL, Utrecht, The Netherlands. c.j.rutten@uu.nl  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2013/03/07  
  ISSN 1525-3198 (Electronic) 0022-0302 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Web of Science searched Approved yes  
  Call Number (up) UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1099 Serial 2582  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Gartner, M.C.; Weiss, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Personality in felids: a review Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Applied Animal Behaviour Science Abbreviated Journal Appl Anim Behav Sci  
  Volume 144 Issue 1 Pages 1-13  
  Keywords Pets and Companion Animals [LL070]; Biological Resources (General) [PP700]; Techniques and Methodology [ZZ900]; Animal Behaviour [LL300]; animal behaviour; conservation; data analysis; guidelines; health; meta-analysis; methodology; objectives; personality; pets; research; reviews; techniques; temperament; terminology; cats; Felidae; Felis; Fissipeda; carnivores; mammals; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; eukaryotes; animal behavior; behavior; goals; methods; pet animals; recommendations; studies; targets; [Indexed using CAB Thesaurus terms]  
  Abstract Although there has been an increase in felid personality research, much more work is needed, with only 20 published studies, 17 of which focused on the domestic cat. Most studies show important implications for this type of research, but there is no consensus on terminology, method, or conclusions for felids, even at the species level. Felid personality research comes from various fields, and is often carried out with different methods, with diverse goals. This review evaluates the published research on felid personality, and addresses its reliability and validity. Only 60% of the studies reported reliability estimates, and these varied greatly across personality dimensions. The sample weighted mean correlation of the reliability estimates was 0.68 (based on three studies). Fifty-five percent of the studies assessed validity. The personality dimensions with the highest validity for all species were Sociable, Dominant, and Curious, with a mean correlation of 0.82. Recommendations for future research and implications for aiding in conservation and captive animal management efforts and improving health and well-being and welfare are discussed.  
  Address Department of Psychology, School of Philosophy, Psychology and Language Sciences, The University of Edinburgh, 7 George Square, Edinburgh EH8 9JZ, UK. m.c.gartner@sms.ed.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0168-1591 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PsychInfo, CAB Abstracts, Web of Science, BIOSIS and MEDLINE. Database record copyright CAB International 2010 Approved yes  
  Call Number (up) UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1100 Serial 2428  
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Author Dorea, F.C.; Sanchez, J.; Revie, C.W. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Veterinary syndromic surveillance: Current initiatives and potential for development Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Preventive Veterinary Medicine Abbreviated Journal Prev Vet Med  
  Volume 101 Issue 1-2 Pages 1-17  
  Keywords Animals; Bioterrorism/prevention & control; Communicable Diseases, Emerging/epidemiology/veterinary; Data Collection/methods; Databases, Factual; Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control/veterinary; Humans; Public Health Practice; Sentinel Surveillance/veterinary  
  Abstract This paper reviews recent progress in the development of syndromic surveillance systems for veterinary medicine. Peer-reviewed and grey literature were searched in order to identify surveillance systems that explicitly address outbreak detection based on systematic monitoring of animal population data, in any phase of implementation. The review found that developments in veterinary syndromic surveillance are focused not only on animal health, but also on the use of animals as sentinels for public health, representing a further step towards One Medicine. The main sources of information are clinical data from practitioners and laboratory data, but a number of other sources are being explored. Due to limitations inherent in the way data on animal health is collected, the development of veterinary syndromic surveillance initially focused on animal health data collection strategies, analyzing historical data for their potential to support systematic monitoring, or solving problems of data classification and integration. Systems based on passive notification or data transfers are now dealing with sustainability issues. Given the ongoing barriers in availability of data, diagnostic laboratories appear to provide the most readily available data sources for syndromic surveillance in animal health. As the bottlenecks around data source availability are overcome, the next challenge is consolidating data standards for data classification, promoting the integration of different animal health surveillance systems, and also the integration to public health surveillance. Moreover, the outputs of systems for systematic monitoring of animal health data must be directly connected to real-time decision support systems which are increasingly being used for disease management and control.  
  Address Department of Health Management, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, 550 University Avenue, Charlottetown, PE, C1A 4P3, Canada. fdorea@upei.ca  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2011/06/07  
  ISSN 1873-1716 (Electronic) 0167-5877 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed and CAB Abstracts searched Approved yes  
  Call Number (up) UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1101 Serial 2395  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Geburek, F.; Stadler, P. url  openurl
  Title [Regenerative therapy for tendon and ligament disorders in horses: results of treatment with stemcells, blood products, scaffolds and growth factors – review of the literature and meta analysis] Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Pferdeheilkunde Abbreviated Journal Pferdeheilkunde  
  Volume 27 Issue 6 Pages 609  
  Keywords Non-communicable Diseases and Injuries of Animals [LL860]; Animal Surgery and Non-drug Therapy [LL884]; Diagnostic, Therapeutic and Pharmacological Biotechnology [WW700]; adipose tissue; blood; blood plasma; bone marrow; bone marrow cells; embryonic stem cells; growth factors; ligaments; musculoskeletal anomalies; platelets; regeneration; relapse; stem cells; tendons; therapy; tissue repair; horses; Germany; Developed Countries; European Union Countries; OECD Countries; Western Europe; Europe; Equus; Equidae; Perissodactyla; ungulates; mammals; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; eukaryotes; blood platelets; plasma (blood); recurrence of disease; relapses; skeletomuscular anomalies; therapeutics; thrombocytes; [Indexed using CAB Thesaurus terms]  
  Abstract Conventional treatments for tendon and ligament disorders give rise to functionally inferior repair tissue within a relatively long healing phase which results in a relatively high recurrence rate. There is however increasing evidence that intralesional treatments with cells, blood products, scaffolds and biological factors such as growth factors have a regenerative effect. In the present review the principal scientific findings on the clinical effects in living horses of, for example, bone-marrow-derived and adipose-tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and blood products such as PRP (platelet rich plasma), ACP (autologous conditioned plasma) and ACS (autologous conditioned serum) are summarized and discussed. Relating to horses, several scientific investigations with different study designs can be found in the literature: (1) Clinical case series, which allow a limited comparison of different treatment methods on the basis of the resulting recurrence rate. (2) Experimental animal studies on controlled artificial tendon defects, which often provide detailed results on the histological, biochemical and biomechanical quality of repair tissue. (3) Single placebo-controlled studies of naturally occurring tendinopathies which should, at least theoretically, provide the highest degree of evidence, however show methodological weaknesses in many cases. Among other aspects, the advantages and disadvantages of the various substrates, their biological safety, their effect with regard to the structural and biomechanical properties of different tendons and ligaments and their effect on the recurrence rate of tendon and ligament disorders are described and discussed. There is increasing evidence that substrates with regenerative potential are superior to other, i.e. conventional, treatments although it is still not clear which product or combination of substrates is most appropriate in individual cases.  
  Address Fachtierarzt fur Pferde, Stiftung Tierarztliche Hochschule Hannover, Klinik fur Pferde, Bunteweg 9, 30559 Hannover, Germany. florian.geburek@tiho-hannover.de  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language German Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0177-7726 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, Web of Science and Google searched. Database record copyright CAB International 2010 Approved yes  
  Call Number (up) UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1102 Serial 2429  
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