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Author (up) Baker, M.R.; Gobush, K.S.; Vynne, C.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Review of factors influencing stress hormones in fish and wildlife Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Journal for Nature Conservation Abbreviated Journal J Nat Conserv  
  Volume 21 Issue 5 Pages 309-318  
  Keywords Reproduction, Development and Life Cycle (Wild Animals) [YY200]; Physiology and Biochemistry (Wild Animals) [YY400]; Other Wildlife Diseases [YY800]; Fisheries [MM110]; Aquatic Biology and Ecology [MM300]; Biological Resources (Animal) [PP710]; animal physiology; body condition; capture of animals; conservation; correlation analysis; corticosterone; environmental factors; glucocorticoids; hormones; hydrocortisone; meta-analysis; mortality; reproduction; stress; stress response; wild animals; wildlife; wildlife conservation; fishes; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; eukaryotes; cortisol; death rate; [Indexed using CAB Thesaurus terms]  
  Abstract Conservation efforts to better understand how wildlife populations respond to environmental change and anthropogenic disturbance has led to a proliferation of research examining physiological indicators of stress response in wildlife. Glucocorticoid stress hormones (GCs), typically cortisol and corticosterone, are among the most frequently measured indicators of the vertebrate stress response. To review the current state of research on stress physiology of free-ranging animals and its application to conservation, we canvassed more than 1000 articles on GC measures in wildlife published since 1969. For 454 studies published since 1990, we assessed the most commonly analysed correlates and disturbances and conducted a meta-analysis on commonly studied species. We noted a prominent divide in the legacies of fish-related analyses and those of higher order vertebrates and the need and opportunity to transfer knowledge between fields. Fish studies most frequently measured physiological indicators, condition, and the relationship between stress and mortality, whereas other vertebrate studies most frequently measured reproduction, condition, and environmental correlates. Correlates that significantly influenced GC levels across all vertebrate groups and are thus important to control for in study design and analyses include density and dispersal of conspecifics, season, reproductive status, and social status. Consistent trends across commonly studied species included positive GC response to capture and handling, reduced GC response related to acclimation, and a lack of correlation between condition and baseline GC levels. Our synthesis within and across diverse taxonomic orders reveals substantial research coverage but a lack of depth in multivariate analyses and a disparity in how correlates are controlled. This paper provides a comprehensive assessment of correlates and disturbances that influence GC measures and, as such, has useful applications to assist conservation physiologists in study design, analysis, and interpretation.  
  Address Alaska Fisheries Science Center, National Marine Fisheries Service, NOAA, 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Building 4, Seattle, WA 98115, USA. Matthew.Baker@noaa.gov mattbakr@gmail.com kathleen.gobush@noaa.gov Carly.Vynne@nfwf.org  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1617-1381 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes BIOSIS and Web of Science searched. Database record copyright CAB International 2010 Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1182 Serial 2677  
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Author (up) Baker, N.J.; Bancroft, B.A.; Garcia, T.S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A meta-analysis of the effects of pesticides and fertilizers on survival and growth of amphibians Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Science of the Total Environment Abbreviated Journal Sci Total Environ  
  Volume 449 Issue Pages 150-156  
  Keywords Amphibians/growth & development/physiology; Animals; Fertilizers/toxicity; Models, Theoretical; Pesticides/toxicity; Survival Analysis; Amphibians  
  Abstract The input of agrochemicals has contributed to alteration of community composition in managed and associated natural systems, including amphibian biodiversity. Pesticides and fertilizers negatively affect many amphibian species and can cause mortality and sublethal effects, such as reduced growth and increased susceptibility to disease. However, the effect of pesticides and fertilizers varies among amphibian species. We used meta-analytic techniques to quantify the lethal and sublethal effects of pesticides and fertilizers on amphibians in an effort to review the published work to date and produce generalized conclusions. We found that pesticides and fertilizers had a negative effect on survival of -0.9027 and growth of -0.0737 across all reported amphibian species. We also observed differences between chemical classes in their impact on amphibians: inorganic fertilizers, organophosphates, chloropyridinyl, phosphonoglycines, carbamates, and triazines negatively affected amphibian survival, while organophosphates and phosphonoglycines negatively affected amphibian growth. Our results suggest that pesticides and fertilizers are an important stressor for amphibians in agriculturally dominated systems. Furthermore, certain chemical classes are more likely to harm amphibians. Best management practices in agroecosystems should incorporate amphibian species-specific response to agrochemicals as well as life stage dependent susceptibility to best conserve amphibian biodiversity in these landscapes.  
  Address Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331-3803, USA. nick.baker@oregonstate.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2013/02/21  
  ISSN 1879-1026 (Electronic) 0048-9697 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Aquatic Sciences and Fisheries Abstract, BIOSIS, Environmental Sciences and Pollution Management, Web of Science and Wildlife and Ecology Studies Worldwide searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 885 Serial 2346  
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Author (up) Baker, S.E.; Cain, R.; Kesteren, F. van; Zommers, Z.A.; D'Cruze, N.; Macdonald, D.W. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Rough trade: animal welfare in the global wildlife trade Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication BioScience Abbreviated Journal BioScience  
  Volume 63 Issue 12 Pages 928-938  
  Keywords Laws and Regulations [DD500]; Natural Resource Economics [EE115]; International Trade [EE600]; Marketing and Distribution [EE700]; Pets and Companion Animals [LL070]; Animal Health and Hygiene (General) [LL800]; Animal Welfare [LL810]; Biological Resources (Animal) [PP710]; Non-food/Non-feed Animal Products [SS100]; animal health; animal products; animal welfare; international trade; literature reviews; marketing; pets; regulations; trade in animals; wild animals; wild birds; wildlife conservation; wildlife management; world; world markets; Amphibia; birds; mammals; reptiles; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; eukaryotes; animal rights; pet animals; rules; worldwide; animal welfare; [Indexed using CAB Thesaurus terms]  
  Abstract Wildlife trade is a big and burgeoning business, but its welfare impacts have not been studied comprehensively. We review the animal welfare impacts of the wildlife trade as they were reported in the literature between 2006 and 2011. Rarely was the term welfare mentioned, evidence of welfare impact documented, or welfare improvement recommended. Literature focused on mammals and on animals killed on site, for luxury goods or food, and for traditional medicine. Welfare impacts may be underreported, particularly in international, illegal, and wild-caught trade and trade in reptiles. Greater attention should perhaps be paid to the welfare of animals traded alive and in larger numbers (e.g., birds, reptiles, amphibians) and to those-including mammals-potentially subject to greater impacts through live use (e.g., as pets). More evidence-based research is needed. Animal welfare should be integrated with wider issues; collaboration between conservationists and welfarists and the development of health and welfare levers to influence trade offer benefits to both people and wildlife.  
  Address Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. sandra.baker@zoo.ox.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0006-3568 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Web of Knowledge (Web of Science?), Scopus, Zoological Record, CAB Abstracts and Cambridge Scientific Abstracts searched. Database record copyright CAB International 2010 Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1199 Serial 2692  
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Author (up) Baker, W.S.; Gray, G.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A review of published reports regarding zoonotic pathogen infection in veterinarians Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association Abbreviated Journal J Am Vet Med Assoc  
  Volume 234 Issue 10 Pages 1271-1278  
  Keywords Animals; Humans; Occupational Diseases/epidemiology; Risk Factors; Veterinarians/statistics & numerical data; Zoonoses/epidemiology/transmission  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To identify published reports regarding zoonotic pathogen infection among veterinarians. DESIGN: Literature review. PROCEDURES: The PubMed electronic database of medical literature published between 1966 and November 2007 was searched. Clinical case reports and reports of outbreak investigations were also identified through searches of the literature outside of PubMed and searches of references listed in included articles. Reports eligible for inclusion included controlled and uncontrolled studies examining seroprevalence of animal pathogens in veterinarians, serosurveys involving veterinarians, and reports of zoonotic pathogen infections causing clinical illness. RESULTS: 66 relevant articles were identified. This included 44 seroepidemiologic studies (some examined > 1 pathogen), 12 case reports, 3 outbreak investigations, and 7 self-reported surveys (including 4 related to personal protective equipment use). Of the 44 seroepidemiologic studies, 37 (84%) identified an increased risk of zoonotic pathogen infection among veterinarians, and 7 (16%) identified no increased risk or a decreased risk. Surveys also documented that veterinarians often failed to use recommended personal protective equipment. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Our review indicated that veterinarians had an increased risk of infection with a number of zoonotic pathogens. It also suggested that veterinarians may inadvertently serve as biological sentinels for emerging pathogens and could potentially spread zoonotic pathogens to their families, community members, and the animals for which they provide care. Professional and policy measures should be implemented to reduce the risk that veterinarians will become infected with, or transmit, zoonotic pathogens.  
  Address Center for Emerging Infectious Diseases, Department of Epidemiology, College of Public Health, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52241, USA.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2009/05/16  
  ISSN 0003-1488 (Print) 0003-1488 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes MEDLINE searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 871 Serial 2347  
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Author (up) Baltzell, P.; Engelken, T.; O'Connor, A.M. doi  openurl
  Title A critical review and meta-analysis of the magnitude of the effect of anthelmintic use on stocker calf production parameters in Northern US States Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Veterinary Parasitology Abbreviated Journal Vet Parasitol  
  Volume 214 Issue 1-2 Pages 2-11  
  Keywords Cattle; Calves; Bovines; Anthelmintics  
  Abstract Parasitism of the gastrointestinal tract of cattle leads to diminished health and productivity of grazing livestock. Anthelmintics are used to decrease parasite loads in cattle for improved weight gain. This critical review and meta-analysis aims to quantify the magnitude of the effect of use of anthelmintic products on production metrics in beef stocker calves. Four databases were searched in March 2013. Eligible studies compared average daily gain (ADG), or weight gain in stocker calves in northern climates of the United States that received anthelmintic treatments compared with placebo or an alternative anthelmintic treatment. Study results were extracted, and where possible, summary effect measures were calculated. Of 512 citations identified by the search, 9 manuscripts with 23 relevant individual studies were selected. Risk of bias was assessed for all studies included in the review and assessed to be unclear for the majority of the studies. There were 23 studies that assessed the magnitude of effect of anthelmintic use on ADG (summary mean difference in ADG=0.05kg (50g), 95% CI=0.03-0.07kg, p<0.00001). The magnitude of weight gain associated with anthelmintic use could not be assessed, as measures of precision (standard errors or standard deviations) were not reported in these studies. Overall, the conclusion was made that anthelmintic use is associated with an increased weight gain. However, the approach to reporting employed by authors for this type of study means that many studies could not be included in the meta-analysis and the magnitude of effect not determined.  
  Address Veterinary Diagnostic and Production Animal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, United States. Veterinary Diagnostic and Production Animal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, United States. Electronic address: oconnor@iastate.edu.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2015/09/29  
  ISSN 1873-2550 (Electronic) 0304-4017 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes CAB Abstracts, BIOSIS Previews, PubMed, Agricola and WorldCat searched Approved no  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1384 Serial 2851  
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Author (up) Baltzell, P.; Newton, H.; O'Connor, A.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A critical review and meta-analysis of the efficacy of whole-cell killed Tritrichomonas foetus vaccines in beef cattle Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Vet Intern Med  
  Volume 27 Issue 4 Pages 760-770  
  Keywords Animals; Cattle; Cattle Diseases/prevention & control; Protozoan Infections, Animal/prevention & control; Protozoan Vaccines/immunology; Tritrichomonas/immunology; Protozoan Vaccines  
  Abstract This review assesses the efficacy of whole cell Tritrichomonas foetus vaccine to prevent and treat trichomoniasis in beef cattle. Three databases were searched in June 2012. Eligible studies compared infection risk, open risk, and abortion risk in heifers or infection risk in bulls that received vaccine compared with no vaccine. Study results were extracted, summary effect measures were calculated, and the quality of the evidence was assessed. From 334 citations identified, 10 were relevant to the review. For heifers, there was limited evidence of moderate quality to assess the impact of vaccination on infection risk (RR, 0.89; P = .16; 95% CI, 0.76-1.05; 6 randomized and 4 nonrandomized studies; 251 animals) and open risk (RR, 0.80; P = .06; 95% CI, 0.63-1.01; 6 randomized and 5 nonrandomized studies; 570 animals). The quality of the body of work describing the impact of vaccination on abortion risk was low (summary RR, 0.57; P = .0003; 95% CI, 0.42-0.78; 3 randomized and 2 nonrandomized studies; 176 animals). The quality of evidence was very low for duration of infection (mean difference, -23.42; P = .003; 95% CI, -38.36 to -7.85; 2 randomized and 3 nonrandomized studies; 163 animals). Although the summary effect measures suggest a benefit to vaccination, due to publication bias the effect reported here is likely an over estimate of efficacy. For bull-associated outcomes, the evidence base was low or very low quality.  
  Address Veterinary Diagnostic and Production Animal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA.  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2013/05/25  
  ISSN 1939-1676 (Electronic) 0891-6640 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, CAB Abstracts, and AGRICOLA searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1104 Serial 2348  
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Author (up) Bangar, Y.C.; Singh, B.; Dohare, A.K.; Verma, M.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A systematic review and meta-analysis of prevalence of subclinical mastitis in dairy cows in India Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Tropical Animal Health and Production Abbreviated Journal Trop Anim Health Prod  
  Volume 47 Issue 2 Pages 291-7  
  Keywords Cattle; Cows; Dairy cows; Mastitis  
  Abstract The purpose of the study was to provide the pooled estimate of the prevalence of subclinical mastitis among dairy cows in India and to examine the consistency of those estimates between published studies. We have conducted a systematic review of prevalence of subclinical mastitis in dairy cows for the period 1995-2014 using electronic and non-electronic databases. Meta-analysis of 28 studies was done under random effects model using Metaprop package in R software. The pooled estimate of prevalence of subclinical mastitis on cow-basis was obtained using 6344 cows from 25 studies and was found to be 46.35 % (95 % CI 39.38; 53.46). Meta-analysis for quarter-wise prevalence of subclinical mastitis was carried out using 18,721 udder quarters of dairy cows from 23 studies, and the pooled estimate of prevalence of subclinical mastitis on quarter-basis was found to be 23.25 % (95 % CI 18.15; 29.27). Meta-analysis showed that there is statistically high heterogeneity for the prevalence estimates between published studies. The present study reported that there is high prevalence of subclinical mastitis in dairy cows in India, which might be responsible for low productivity in lactating cows in India over the years and needs to be controlled by adopting scientific, managemental, and therapeutic measures. Dairy farmers can reduce incidence and economic losses due to subclinical mastitis under the guidance of field veterinarians.  
  Address Division of Livestock Economics, Statistics and Information Technology, Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Izatnagar, Bareilly, Uttar Pradesh, India, yogeshbangar07@gmail.com.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2014/11/20  
  ISSN 1573-7438 (Electronic) 0049-4747 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Science Direct, PubMed and Google Scholar searched Approved no  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1285 Serial 2772  
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Author (up) Barco, L.; Belluco, S.; Roccato, A.; Ricci, A. doi  openurl
  Title A systematic review of studies on Escherichia coli and Enterobacteriaceae on beef carcasses at the slaughterhouse Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication International Journal of Food Microbiology Abbreviated Journal Int J Food Microbiol  
  Volume 207 Issue Pages 30-39  
  Keywords Cattle; Bovines; Sheep; Ovines; Goats; Caprines; Horses; Equines; Pigs, Procines, Swine; Abattoirs; cherichia coli; Fecal contamination  
  Abstract European legislation has defined as process hygiene criteria for the main livestock species (cattle, sheep, goats, horses and pigs) the monitoring of aerobic colony count and Enterobacteriaceae. Detected values above the defined criteria require an improvement in slaughter hygiene and the review of process control. The main source of microbiological contamination of beef carcasses along the slaughterline is of fecal origin, therefore Escherichia coli and Enterobacteriaceae seem to be the most suitable indicators to assess the hygienic status of the slaughter process. Although microbiological criteria addressing indicator bacteria have been in place in industrialized countries for several years, scattered information still exists on factors affecting their counts on beef carcasses along the slaughterline. Therefore, a systematic literature review, covering the period 2000-2012, was conducted to gather information concerning: 1) counts of E. coli and Enterobacteriaceae on beef carcasses linked to different stages of the slaughterline; 2) factors influencing presence/counts of E. coli and Enterobacteriaceae on beef carcasses; and 3) the relationship between indicator bacteria (E. coli and Enterobacteriaceae) counts and visual fecal contamination of beef carcasses. According to the 41 retrieved papers the following conclusions were drawn. A decrease of the indicator bacteria counts was recorded after sequential decontamination treatments, such as pasteurization and hot water washing. Slaughterhouse characteristics influenced bacterial load of beef carcasses, although it was difficult to assess which factors (i.e., slaughterhouse throughput, design of the plant, surveillance system in place) had the greatest effect. Finally, carcasses from fecal contaminated animals had higher bacterial loads than those from clean animals. Therefore, the development of a visual classification system of the level of dirtiness of carcasses and the application of effective treatments on the carcasses classified as dirty along the slaughterline can lead to a contamination level for these carcasses comparable to or lower than that of originally clean ones at the end of the slaughterline.  
  Address Food Safety Department, Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale delle Venezie, Viale dell'Universita 10, 35020 Legnaro, PD, Italy. Food Safety Department, Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale delle Venezie, Viale dell'Universita 10, 35020 Legnaro, PD, Italy. Electronic address: aricci@izsvenezie.it.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2015/05/16  
  ISSN 1879-3460 (Electronic) 0168-1605 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, Web of Science and Google Scholar searched Approved no  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1396 Serial 2860  
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Author (up) Barker, S.B.; Wolen, A.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The benefits of human-companion animal interaction: a review Type Journal Article
  Year 2008 Publication Journal of Veterinary Medical Education Abbreviated Journal J Vet Med Educ  
  Volume 35 Issue 4 Pages 487-495  
  Keywords Animals; Animals, Domestic/psychology; Bonding, Human-Pet; Cardiovascular Diseases/psychology; Congresses as Topic; Health Status; Humans; Mental Disorders/psychology/therapy; Mental Health; Ownership; Social Support; Dogs; Cats; Rabbits  
  Abstract This article provides a review of research published since 1980 on the benefits of human-companion animal interaction. Studies focusing on the benefits of pet ownership are presented first, followed by research on the benefits of interacting with companion animals that are not owned by the subject (animal-assisted activities). While most of the published studies are descriptive and have been conducted with convenience samples, a promising number of controlled studies support the health benefits of interacting with companion animals. Future research employing more rigorous designs and systematically building upon a clearly defined line of inquiry is needed to advance our knowledge of the benefits of human-companion animal interaction.  
  Address The School of Medicine Center for Human-Animal Interaction, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298, USA. sbarker@mcvh-vcu.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2009/02/21  
  ISSN 0748-321X (Print) 0748-321X (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and CINAHL searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 433 Serial 2349  
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Author (up) Bashardoust Tajali, S.; Macdermid, J.C.; Houghton, P.; Grewal, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of low power laser irradiation on bone healing in animals: a meta-analysis Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Research Abbreviated Journal J Orthop Surg Res  
  Volume 5 Issue Pages 1  
  Keywords Animals; Rabbits  
  Abstract PURPOSE: The meta-analysis was performed to identify animal research defining the effects of low power laser irradiation on biomechanical indicators of bone regeneration and the impact of dosage. METHODS: We searched five electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, PubMed, CINAHL, and Cochrane Database of Randomised Clinical Trials) for studies in the area of laser and bone healing published from 1966 to October 2008. Included studies had to investigate fracture healing in any animal model, using any type of low power laser irradiation, and use at least one quantitative biomechanical measures of bone strength. There were 880 abstracts related to the laser irradiation and bone issues (healing, surgery and assessment). Five studies met our inclusion criteria and were critically appraised by two raters independently using a structured tool designed for rating the quality of animal research studies. After full text review, two articles were deemed ineligible for meta-analysis because of the type of injury method and biomechanical variables used, leaving three studies for meta-analysis. Maximum bone tolerance force before the point of fracture during the biomechanical test, 4 weeks after bone deficiency was our main biomechanical bone properties for the Meta analysis. RESULTS: Studies indicate that low power laser irradiation can enhance biomechanical properties of bone during fracture healing in animal models. Maximum bone tolerance was statistically improved following low level laser irradiation (average random effect size 0.726, 95% CI 0.08-1.37, p 0.028). While conclusions are limited by the low number of studies, there is concordance across limited evidence that laser improves the strength of bone tissue during the healing process in animal models.  
  Address Department of Physical Therapy, Elborn College, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6G1H1, Canada. sbashar@uwo.ca  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2010/01/06  
  ISSN 1749-799X (Electronic) 1749-799X (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes MEDLINE, Embase, PubMed, CINAHL and Cochrane Database of Randomised Clinical Trials searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 431 Serial 2350  
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Author (up) Batchelor, D.J.; Devauchelle, P.; Elliott, J.; Elwood, C.M.; Freiche, V.; Gualtieri, M.; Hall, E.J.; Den Hertog, E.; Neiger, R.; Peeters, D.; Roura, X.; Savary-Bataille, K.; German, A.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Mechanisms, causes, investigation and management of vomiting disorders in cats: a literature review Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery Abbreviated Journal J Feline Med Surg  
  Volume 15 Issue 4 Pages 237-265  
  Keywords Cats  
  Abstract Vomiting is a common presenting complaint in feline practice. This article differs from previous reviews in that it is an evidence-based review of the mechanisms, causes, investigation and management of vomiting in the domestic cat. Published evidence was reviewed, and then used to make recommendations for clinical assessment, diagnosis, antiemetic drug treatment, dietary management and monitoring of cats presenting with vomiting. The strength of the evidence on which recommendations are made (and areas where evidence is lacking for cats) has been highlighted throughout.  
  Address School of Veterinary Science, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2013/02/14  
  ISSN 1532-2750 (Electronic) 1098-612X (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, CAB Direct (CAB Abstracts?), Google Scholar and Web of Science searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1098 Serial 2351  
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Author (up) Batorek, N.; Candek-Potokar, M.; Bonneau, M.; Van Milgen, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Meta-analysis of the effect of immunocastration on production performance, reproductive organs and boar taint compounds in pigs Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Animal : an International Journal of Animal Bioscience Abbreviated Journal Animal  
  Volume 6 Issue 8 Pages 1330-1338  
  Keywords Androsterone/metabolism; Animals; Genitalia, Male/growth & development; Male; Meat/standards; Orchiectomy/methods/veterinary; Skatole/metabolism; Sus scrofa/growth & development/surgery; Pigs; Swine  
  Abstract Meta-analytical approach was used to quantitatively synthesize the effect of immunocastration on growth, carcass, meat quality, reproductive organs and boar taint compounds. Altogether, 41 papers were collected for effect size (theta) calculation and the comparisons were made with entire males (EM) and surgical castrates (SC). The data for reproductive organs and growth performance are numerous enough to draw firm conclusions. In contrast, data for carcass and meat quality are more limited. Results of meta-analysis show efficient immunocastration with the magnitude of the response being by far the largest for reproductive organs (theta = -2.8 to -5.0) and boar taint substances (theta = -2.8 and -0.8 for androstenone and skatole, respectively). However, compared with SC, the immunocastrates exhibit larger bulbourethral glands (theta = 1.3) and slightly higher concentrations of androstenone and skatole (theta = 0.1 and theta = 0.2, respectively). The impact of immunocastration is also remarkable on performance, where the main advantage of the immunocastrates is their boar-like performance until revaccination. In the period following the second vaccination, they eat much more than EM (theta = 2.1), resulting in large effect size for growth rate compared with both EM and SC (theta = 1.1 and theta = 1.4, respectively). Considering the whole fattening period, their feed conversion ratio is higher compared with EM (theta = 0.6) and much lower than that of SC (theta = -1.3), although exhibiting moderately faster growth compared with both (theta = 0.6 and theta = 0.2, respectively). With regard to carcass quality, the immunocastrates take intermediate position between EM and SC. Besides, our analysis suggests no difference in meat quality with SC and some meat quality advantages of immunocastrates over EM because of higher intramuscular fat content (theta = 0.4) and lower shear force (theta = -0.6).  
  Address Agricultural Institute of Slovenia, Hacquetova 17, 1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2012/12/12  
  ISSN 1751-732X (Electronic) 1751-7311 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Web of Science, CAB Abstracts and “Internet” searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 859 Serial 2352  
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Author (up) Baudon, E.; Peyre, M.; Peiris, M.; Cowling, B.J. doi  openurl
  Title Epidemiological features of influenza circulation in swine populations: A systematic review and meta-analysis Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication PLoS One Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 12 Issue 6 Pages e0179044  
  Keywords Swine; Pigs; Influenza; Virus; Swine flu  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: The emergence of the 2009 influenza pandemic virus with a swine origin stressed the importance of improving influenza surveillance in swine populations. The objectives of this systematic review and meta-analysis were to describe epidemiological features of swine influenza (SI) across the world and identify factors impacting swine influenza virus surveillance. METHODS: The systematic review followed the PRISMA guidelines. Articles published after 1990 containing data on SI on pig and herd-level seroprevalence, isolation and detection rates, and risk factors were included. Meta-regression analyses using seroprevalence and virological rates were performed. RESULTS: A total of 217 articles were included. Low avian influenza (AI) seroprevalence (means pig = 4.1%; herd = 15%) was found, showing that AIV do not readily establish themselves in swine while SIV seroprevalence was usually high across continents (influenza A means pig = 32.6-87.8%; herd = 29.3-100%). Higher pig density and number of pigs per farm were shown by the meta-regression analyses and/or the risk factor articles to be associated with higher SI seroprevalence. Lower seroprevalence levels were observed for countries with low-to-medium GDP. These results suggest that larger industrial farms could be more at risk of SIV circulation. Sampling swine with influenza-like illness (ILI) was positively associated with higher isolation rates; most studies in Europe, Latin and North America were targeting swine with ILI. CONCLUSIONS: To improve understanding of SI epidemiology, standardization of the design and reporting of SI epidemiological studies is desirable. Performance of SI surveillance systems in low-to-medium GDP countries should be evaluated to rule out technical issues linked to lower observed SIV prevalence. Targeting certain swine age groups, farming systems and swine with ILI may improve the surveillance cost-effectiveness. However, focusing on pigs with ILI may bias virus detection against strains less virulent for swine but which may be important as pandemic threats.  
  Address WHO Collaborating Centre for Infectious Disease Epidemiology and Control, School of Public Health, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China. Animal and Integrated Risk Management Research Unit (AGIRs), French Agricultural Research Center for International Development (CIRAD), Montpellier, France.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2017/06/08  
  ISSN 1932-6203 (Electronic) 1932-6203 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, Web of Science, Science Direct, and Scopus searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1434 Serial 2889  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Beauvais, W.; Cardwell, J.M.; Brodbelt, D.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The effect of neutering on the risk of mammary tumours in dogs – a systematic review Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Journal of Small Animal Practice Abbreviated Journal J Small Anim Pract  
  Volume 53 Issue 6 Pages 314-322  
  Keywords Age Factors; Animals; Dog Diseases/epidemiology; Dogs; Female; Hysterectomy/veterinary; Mammary Neoplasms, Animal/epidemiology; Ovariectomy/veterinary; Risk Factors  
  Abstract A commonly-stated advantage of neutering bitches is a significant reduction in the risk of mammary tumours, however the evidence for this has not previously been assessed by systematic review. The objectives of this study were to estimate the magnitude and strength of evidence for any effect of neutering, or age of neutering, on the risk of mammary tumours in bitches. A systematic review was conducted based on Cochrane guidelines. Peer-reviewed analytic journal articles in English were eligible and were assessed for risk of bias by two reviewers independently. Of 11,149 search results, 13 reports in English-language peer-reviewed journals addressed the association between neutering/age at neutering and mammary tumours. Nine were judged to have a high risk of bias. The remaining four were classified as having a moderate risk of bias. One study found an association between neutering and a reduced risk of mammary tumours. Two studies found no evidence of an association. One reported “some protective effect” of neutering on the risk of mammary tumours, but no numbers were presented. Due to the limited evidence available and the risk of bias in the published results, the evidence that neutering reduces the risk of mammary neoplasia, and the evidence that age at neutering has an effect, are judged to be weak and are not a sound basis for firm recommendations.  
  Address Veterinary Epidemiology and Public Health Group, Royal Veterinary College, Hawkshead Lane, North Mymms, Hatfield, Hertfordshire.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2012/06/01  
  ISSN 1748-5827 (Electronic) 0022-4510 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes CAB Direct (CAB Abstracts?), Web of Knowledge (Web of Science?) and PubMed searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 621 Serial 2353  
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Author (up) Beauvais, W.; Cardwell, J.M.; Brodbelt, D.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The effect of neutering on the risk of urinary incontinence in bitches – a systematic review Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Journal of Small Animal Practice Abbreviated Journal J Small Anim Pract  
  Volume 53 Issue 4 Pages 198-204  
  Keywords Age Factors; Animals; Dog Diseases/epidemiology/etiology; Dogs; Evidence-Based Medicine; Female; Hysterectomy/adverse effects/veterinary; Ovariectomy/adverse effects/veterinary; Risk Factors; Urinary Incontinence/epidemiology/etiology/veterinary  
  Abstract An increased risk of urinary incontinence in bitches has often been associated with previous ovariohysterectomy but remains controversial. The objective of this study was to evaluate the strength of evidence for an association between neutering or age at neutering and urinary incontinence in bitches and to estimate the magnitude of any effect found. A systematic review of peer-reviewed original English analytic journal articles was conducted, based on Cochrane guidelines (Higgins and Green 2009) Of 1,853 records screened, seven studies were identified that examined the effect of neutering or age at neutering on the risk of urinary incontinence but four were judged to be at high risk of bias. Of the remaining three studies, which were at moderate risk of bias, there was some weak evidence that neutering, particularly before the age of three months, increases the risk of urinary incontinence. However, overall the evidence is not consistent nor strong enough to make firm recommendations on the effect of neutering or age at neutering on the risk of urinary incontinence.  
  Address Veterinary Epidemiology and Public Health Group, Royal Veterinary College, Hawkshead Lane, North Mymms, Hatfield, Hertfordshire AL9 7TA.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2012/02/23  
  ISSN 1748-5827 (Electronic) 0022-4510 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, CAB Direct (CAB Abstracts?) and Web of Knowledge (Web of Science?) searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 840 Serial 2354  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Beckett, S.D.; Lean, I.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Gonadotrophin-releasing hormone in postpartum dairy cattle: a meta-analysis of effects on reproductive efficiency Type Journal Article
  Year 1997 Publication Animal Reproduction Science Abbreviated Journal Anim Reprod Sci  
  Volume 48 Issue 2-4 Pages 93-112  
  Keywords Animals; Cattle/physiology; Confidence Intervals; Estrus/drug effects; Female; Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone/administration & dosage/pharmacology; Postpartum Period/drug effects; Pregnancy; Pregnancy Rate; Time Factors; Cattle  
  Abstract The efficacy of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) or synthetic analogues in improving the reproductive performance of dairy cows less than 40 days postpartum has not been established. It was postulated that disparity observed between the results of similar trials may have arisen from differences in study design, including the dosage of GnRH used; the number of days after calving at which GnRH was administered; the concurrent use of prostaglandins to induce oestrus; and the enrollment of cows with an abnormal puerperium. The results of 24 trials, extracted from 12 research papers were assessed using meta-analysis. When all trials were considered, treatment with GnRH did not significantly alter the number of days to first oestrus or first service or the relative risk of pregnancy at first service (P > 0.05). While treatment did significantly reduce the number of days open by 2.75 days and the number of services per conception by 0.05 services, the results of these studies were heterogenous (P < 0.001) and the validity of pooled estimates questionable. The results of the subgroup of studies that enrolled only cows with a normal puerperium were homogenous for all outcomes examined (P > 0.43), although none of the pooled estimates were significant. Sensitivity analyses, performed by excluding the consistently outlying results of one study, improved the homogeneity of all outcomes (P > 0.03) and produced a significant reduction of 4.52 days to first oestrus in treated cows. Pooled estimates derived without the results of the outlying study were considered more valid indicators of the direction and likely magnitude of effect than those derived in the heterogenous overall analyses. The results of this meta-analysis showed that while blanket treatment of dairy cows in the postpartum period may reduce the number of days to first oestrus, subsequent reproductive performance is unaltered. The study also demonstrated a need to concentrate further research on the potential for treatment with GnRH during the postpartum period to improve the reproductive performance of cows with an abnormal puerperium.  
  Address Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand. s-beckett@massey.ac.nz  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 1997/08/01  
  ISSN 0378-4320 (Print) 0378-4320 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes “CAB Extracts” (CAB Abstracts?), AGRICOLA, Life Sciences and “Biological Extracts” (Biological Abstracts?) searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 622 Serial 2355  
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Author (up) Belo, V.S.; Struchiner, C.J.; Werneck, G.L.; Barbosa, D.S.; de Oliveira, R.B.; Neto, R.G.; da Silva, E.S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A systematic review and meta-analysis of the factors associated with Leishmania infantum infection in dogs in Brazil Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Veterinary Parasitology Abbreviated Journal Vet Parasitol  
  Volume 195 Issue 1-2 Pages 1-13  
  Keywords Dogs  
  Abstract The risk factors associated with canine visceral leishmaniosis (CVL) in Brazil are unclear and controversial. The objectives of this systematic review and meta-analysis were to identify the best evidence available in this field and to determine the gaps in existing knowledge. Literature searches were carried out using four databases, the reference lists within articles, and references provided by experts in the field. Theoretical discussions or separate and independent meta-analyses of p-values or of effect sizes were used to pool information about each variable. Thirty-six articles were selected for detailed review, including 31 cross-sectional, two ecological and three cohort studies. The variables showing significant association with CVL were short hair, purebred, peri-domestic restricted (as compared with domestic-restricted dogs), and presence of green areas adjacent to home. The occurrence of CVL was also associated with the presence of domestic fowl in the home environment, with free dogs (as compared with restrained dogs), with male gender and with dogs >1 or 2 years of age, although these associations were not statistically significant. Due to the small number of publications, consistent results could not be obtained concerning the role of other factors. Most studies did not describe the criteria of eligibility and the process of selection of participants in sufficient detail and employed only one diagnostic test as proof of infection. Few studies controlled for confounding variables. No statistical evidence of publication bias was detected, but a great deal of information contained in the primary articles was lost because the results were not adequately described. The results of this review contribute to a better understanding of CVL and should assist in optimizing the development and implementation of control policies. Continuous actions, prioritizing dogs at higher risk and areas with higher abundance of green vegetation, together with policies to promote responsible dog ownership are mandatory. Problems concerning study design and data analysis described in the present study need to be taken into consideration in future studies. These must follow clear procedures to select participants and utilize standardized, valid and reliable diagnostic methods. The development of multivariate models and the use of the STROBE statement for description of the results should also be encouraged. Further research should investigate the patterns identified and prioritize CVL-related factors that have not been fully recognized or elucidated. Finally, ecological and cohort studies of CVL and investigations in other countries of Latin America are urgently required.  
  Address Escola Nacional de Saude Publica Sergio Arouca, Rua Leopoldo Bulhoes no. 1480, Manguinhos, 21041-210 Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil. Electronic address: vinicius.belo@terra.com.br.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2013/04/09  
  ISSN 1873-2550 (Electronic) 0304-4017 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, LILACS, CAPES (theses and dissertations published by Brazilian academic institutions) and Google Scholar searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1091 Serial 2356  
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Author (up) Belo, V.S.; Werneck, G.L.; da Silva, E.S.; Barbosa, D.S.; Struchiner, C.J. doi  openurl
  Title Population Estimation Methods for Free-Ranging Dogs: A Systematic Review Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication PLoS One Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 10 Issue 12 Pages e0144830  
  Keywords Dogs; Canines; Free-roaming; Population control  
  Abstract The understanding of the structure of free-roaming dog populations is of extreme importance for the planning and monitoring of populational control strategies and animal welfare. The methods used to estimate the abundance of this group of dogs are more complex than the ones used with domiciled owned dogs. In this systematic review, we analyze the techniques and the results obtained in studies that seek to estimate the size of free-ranging dog populations. Twenty-six studies were reviewed regarding the quality of execution and their capacity to generate valid estimates. Seven of the eight publications that take a simple count of the animal population did not consider the different probabilities of animal detection; only one study used methods based on distances; twelve relied on capture-recapture models for closed populations without considering heterogeneities in capture probabilities; six studies applied their own methods with different potential and limitations. Potential sources of bias in the studies were related to the inadequate description or implementation of animal capturing or viewing procedures and to inadequacies in the identification and registration of dogs. Thus, there was a predominance of estimates with low validity. Abundance and density estimates carried high variability, and all studies identified a greater number of male dogs. We point to enhancements necessary for the implementation of future studies and to potential updates and revisions to the recommendations of the World Health Organization with respect to the estimation of free-ranging dog populations.  
  Address Departamento de Endemias Samuel Pessoa, Fundacao Oswaldo Cruz, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil. Campus Centro-Oeste Dona Lindu, Universidade Federal de Sao Joao del Rei, Divinopolis, Minas Gerais, Brasil. Departamento de Epidemiologia – Instituto de Medicina Social, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brasil.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2015/12/18  
  ISSN 1932-6203 (Electronic) 1932-6203 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Web of Science, Scopus, CAB Abstracts, ProQuest and Google Scholar searched Approved no  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1392 Serial 2857  
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Author (up) Belshaw, Z.; Asher, L.; Dean, R.S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Systematic Review of Outcome Measures Reported in Clinical Canine Osteoarthritis Research Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Veterinary Surgery Abbreviated Journal Vet Surg  
  Volume 45 Issue 4 Pages 480-487  
  Keywords dogs; canines; osteoarthritis; outcome measures  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To record and categorize the outcome measures used in dogs with naturally occurring osteoarthritis (OA) by systematically reviewing the peer reviewed publications on OA in dogs. STUDY DESIGN: Systematic literature review. STUDY POPULATION: Peer reviewed literature on canine OA. METHODS: A computer-based bibliographic search was performed on PubMed and CAB Abstracts in August 2013 to find peer reviewed publications relevant to canine OA. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied. The outcome measures reported within each publication were recorded and categorized for comparison. Adequately described outcome measures were assessed for uniqueness and evidence of prior validation. RESULTS: Of 3,697 publications identified and screened, 117 were deemed eligible for inclusion. Within eligible publications, outcome measures were used 618 times (median of 4 outcome measures per publication). Outcomes measured were divided into 5 groups containing 65 categories. The most frequently assessed outcomes were lameness assessment with no stated gait/mixed gaits (66 outcomes), radiography (58), and lameness single gait/lateral motion (55). Of 618 outcome measures reported, 491 were assessed for uniqueness and 348 (71%) were unique to a single publication. Ten outcome measures were reported to have been validated. CONCLUSION: Many outcome measures have been used to assess canine OA. There is no consensus on which are the most useful outcomes or by which method they should be assessed. There is a pressing need for agreement on outcomes reporting in canine OA and for validation of outcome measures used for these assessments. Until consensus is reached, we recommend at least one validated outcome measure be used in every clinical study.  
  Address Centre for Evidence-based Veterinary Medicine, School of Veterinary Medicine and Science, University of Nottingham, United Kingdom. School of Veterinary Medicine and Science, University of Nottingham, United Kingdom.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2016/04/28  
  ISSN 1532-950X (Electronic) 0161-3499 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed and CAB Abstracts searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1409 Serial 2871  
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Author (up) Bender, J.B.; Shulman, S.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Reports of zoonotic disease outbreaks associated with animal exhibits and availability of recommendations for preventing zoonotic disease transmission from animals to people in such settings Type Journal Article
  Year 2004 Publication Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association Abbreviated Journal J Am Vet Med Assoc  
  Volume 224 Issue 7 Pages 1105-1109  
  Keywords Animal Diseases/epidemiology/transmission; Animals; Animals, Zoo; Disease Notification; Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control/statistics & numerical data/veterinary; Humans; Medline; United States/epidemiology; Zoonoses  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To assess the number of zoonotic disease outbreaks associated with animal exhibits and identify published recommendations for preventing zoonotic disease transmission from animals to people in exhibit settings. DESIGN: Literature review and survey of state public health veterinarians and state epidemiologists. PROCEDURE: MEDLINE and agriculture databases were searched from 1966 through 2000. Retrieved references and additional resources provided by the authors were reviewed. A survey was sent to state public health veterinarians and state epidemiologists to determine whether their states had written recommendations or guidelines for controlling zoonotic diseases in animal exhibition venues, whether their states maintained a listing of animal exhibitors in the state, and whether they had any information on recent outbreaks involving animals in exhibitions. RESULTS: 11 published outbreaks were identified. These outbreaks occurred in a variety of settings including petting zoos, farms, and a zoological park. An additional episode involving exposure to a potentially rabid bear required extensive public health resources. A survey of state public health veterinarians identified 16 additional unpublished outbreaks or incidents. Most states did not have written recommendations or guidelines for controlling zoonotic diseases or any means to disseminate educational materials to animal exhibitors. CONCLUSIONS: Recent outbreaks of zoonotic diseases associated with contact with animals in exhibition venues highlight concerns for disease transmission to public visitors. Only a handful of states have written guidelines for preventing zoonotic disease transmission in animal exhibition venues, and published recommendations currently available focus on preventing enteric diseases and largely do not address other zoonotic diseases or prevention of bite wounds.  
  Address Veterinary Population Medicine Department, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, St Paul, MN 55108, USA.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2004/04/13  
  ISSN 0003-1488 (Print) 0003-1488 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes MEDLINE, VET-CD and BEAST-CD searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 872 Serial 2357  
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