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Author (up) Giannotti, J. di G.; Packer, I.U.; Mercadante, M.E.Z.; Leandro, R.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title [Bayesian meta-analysis of genetic parameters for growth traits in beef cattle] Type Journal Article
  Year 2006 Publication Pesquisa Agropecuaria Brasileira Abbreviated Journal Pesqui Agropecu Bras  
  Volume 41 Issue 1 Pages 15-22  
  Keywords Meat Producing Animals [LL120]; Animal Genetics and Breeding [LL240]; Mathematics and Statistics [ZZ100]; Bayesian theory; beef cattle; birth weight; genetic correlation; genetic parameters; growth; heritability; traits; weaning weight; cattle; Bos; Bovidae; ruminants; Artiodactyla; mammals; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; ungulates; eukaryotes; heritable characters; [Indexed using CAB Thesaurus terms]  
  Abstract Bayesian meta-analysis was performed in a data set of heritability estimates for growth traits of zebu beef cattle with 869 direct heritabilities, 186 maternal heritabilities, and 123 direct-maternal genetic correlation. The fitting and development of a hierarchical model made possible to obtain pooled heritability estimates for birth weight, weaning weight, weight at 365 days of age and weight at 550 days of age, whose values were, respectively: 0.31, 0.24, 0.28 and 0.33 for direct effects; 0.09, 0.13, 0.12 and 0.05 for maternal effects; and -0.16, -0.16, -0.20 and -0.16 for direct-maternal genetic correlation. Meta-analysis conducted under Bayesian framework was adequate, since hierarchical model considers between-study and within-study variances, and its implementation and conduction are facilitated, mainly, due to the advance in computational area.  
  Address Instituto de Economia Agricola, Secretaria da Agricultura e Abastecimento, Av. Miguel Stefano, 3900, CEP 04301-903 Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil. juliana@iea.sp.gov.br iupacker@esalq.usp.br mercadante@iz.sp.gov.br raleandr@esalq.usp.br  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Portuguese Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0100-204x ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes CAB (Abstracts?) and AGRIS searched. Database record copyright CAB International 2010 Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 327 Serial 2433  
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Author (up) Giannotti, J. di G.; Packer, I.U.; Mercadante, M.E.Z.; Lima, C.G. de url  doi
openurl 
  Title [Cluster analysis for meta-analysis implementation for heritability of estimates growth traits in beef cattle] Type Journal Article
  Year 2005 Publication Revista Brasileira de Zootecnia Abbreviated Journal Rev Bras Zootecn  
  Volume 34 Issue 4 Pages 1165-1172  
  Keywords Meat Producing Animals [LL120]; Animal Genetics and Breeding [LL240]; Mathematics and Statistics [ZZ100]; beef cattle; birth weight; body weight; cluster analysis; growth; heritability; multivariate analysis; Nelore; weaning weight; cattle; Bos; Bovidae; ruminants; Artiodactyla; mammals; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; ungulates; eukaryotes; heritable characters; meta-analysis; [Indexed using CAB Thesaurus terms]  
  Abstract Heritability estimates of growth traits are essential information in animal breeding programmes. In this paper, 869 heritability estimates of birth weight, weaning weight, weight at 365 days old and weight at 550 days old of 186 reports were compiled. The estimates were divided in groups using the Ward method of cluster analysis and pooled by meta-analysis. It was shown that for all traits, Nelore cattle, the majority of cattle in Brazil, had greater pooled heritability estimates than the other breeds. Restricted maximum likelihood and DerSimonian and Laird methods were used to estimate the variance between studies, where the first method showed higher variances.  
  Address Instituto de Economia Agricola – IEA, Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil. juliana@iea.sp.gov.br  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Portuguese Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1516-3598 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes CAB (Abstracts?) and AGRIS searched. Database record copyright CAB International 2010 Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 328 Serial 2434  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Gibson, C.L.; Gray, L.J.; Bath, P.M.; Murphy, S.P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Progesterone for the treatment of experimental brain injury; a systematic review Type Journal Article
  Year 2008 Publication Brain : a Journal of Neurology Abbreviated Journal Brain  
  Volume 131 Issue Pt 2 Pages 318-328  
  Keywords Animals; Brain Injuries/drug therapy/pathology; Disease Models, Animal; Dose-Response Relationship, Drug; Drug Administration Schedule; Female; Male; Neuroprotective Agents/therapeutic use; Progesterone/administration & dosage/therapeutic use  
  Abstract Steroid sex hormones are potential neuroprotective candidates following CNS injury. All clinical trials to date have examined the effects of oestrogen alone or oestrogen-progestin combination therapy. Experimental studies have suggested that progesterone, in its own right, is a potential neuroprotective agent following acute cerebral injury. We performed a systematic review of controlled animal studies that administered progesterone before, or after, acute cerebral injury and measured lesion volume. Relevant studies were found from searching PubMed, Embase and Web of Science. From 119 identified publications, data from 18 studies using 480 experimental subjects met specific criteria and were analysed using the Cochrane Review Manager software. Following cerebral ischaemia, a significant benefit of progesterone was observed regardless of the assigned study quality score (P = 0.0002) whereas, following traumatic brain injury (TBI) a significant benefit of progesterone was only observed in studies that obtained the highest quality score of 5 (P = 0.02). Progesterone reduced lesion volume in a dose-dependent manner following either cerebral ischaemia (P < 0.001) or TBI (P = 0.03) with the most effective progesterone dose varying according to experimental injury model used. Progesterone treatment was only effective at reducing lesion volume when administered immediately following (i.e. 0-2 h) cerebral ischaemia (P = 0.0008). No studies using models of cerebral ischaemia or TBI assessed efficacy when progesterone was administered at later than 6 h following the onset of cerebral injury. Limited data were available for different groups of animals according to age/hormonal status and the full dose-response relationship was not available in all experimental groups. Although this systematic review provides some supporting evidence for a neuroprotective role of progesterone following either cerebral ischaemia or TBI importantly it highlights areas which need further pre-clinical investigation.  
  Address School of Psychology, Henry Wellcome Building, Lancaster Road, Leicester, LE1 9HN, UK. cg95@le.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2007/08/24  
  ISSN 1460-2156 (Electronic) 0006-8950 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, Embase and Web of Science searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 450 Serial 2435  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Gibson, C.L.; Murphy, S.P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Benefits of histone deacetylase inhibitors for acute brain injury: a systematic review of animal studies Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication Journal of Neurochemistry Abbreviated Journal J Neurochem  
  Volume 115 Issue 4 Pages 806-813  
  Keywords Animals; Brain Injuries/drug therapy/enzymology/pathology; Disease Models, Animal; Drug Evaluation, Preclinical/methods; Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors/therapeutic use; Humans  
  Abstract Drugs that inhibit histone deacetylase (HDAC) activities have enormous potential as neuroprotective agents. We performed a systematic review of controlled animal studies that administered known inhibitors of the zinc-dependent HDACs before and/or after acute cerebral injury and assessed anatomic/functional outcomes. Relevant studies were found by searching PubMed, Embase and Web of Science. From more than 100 identified publications, those data meeting specific criteria were analyzed using the Cochrane Review Manager software. A beneficial effect of administering HDAC inhibitors was seen in studies involving cerebral ischemia or non-ischemic models of acute cerebral injury. Specific studies assessed efficacy when drug was administered up to 14 days prior to, and 14 days following, the onset of cerebral injury. This systematic review provides objective evidence of a neuroprotective role for drugs that inhibit HDACs and highlights particular areas that require further experimental investigation.  
  Address School of Psychology, University of Leicester, Leicester, UK. cg95@le.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2010/09/14  
  ISSN 1471-4159 (Electronic) 0022-3042 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, Embase and Web of Science searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 451 Serial 2436  
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Author (up) Giuffrida, M.A.; Kerrigan, S.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Quality of life measurement in prospective studies of cancer treatments in dogs and cats Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine / American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Vet Intern Med  
  Volume 28 Issue 6 Pages 1824-9  
  Keywords Dogs; Cats; Cancer; Quality of life; QOL  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Quality of life (QOL) is an important consideration in healthcare decision-making for pets with cancer. To determine the effect of disease and treatment on pet QOL, this important variable should be objectively measured as an outcome in veterinary cancer studies. OBJECTIVES: To determine the prevalence and methodology of QOL measurement in a sample of recently published reports of prospective studies evaluating cancer treatments in client-owned dogs and cats; to characterize reporting of QOL outcomes and to identify article characteristics associated with QOL measurement. METHODS: English-language reports of prospective studies of cancer treatments in dogs and cats published from 2008 to 2013 were identified using medical research databases combined with a hand-searching strategy. Data pertaining to general article characteristics and QOL measurement were abstracted and summarized. RESULTS: Reports of 144 eligible studies were identified. QOL was measured in 16 (11.1%) studies, with 8 (5.6%) reporting the results. All studies that measured QOL reported using unvalidated instruments, or did not report how QOL was assessed. Only 1 study provided sufficient information for QOL measurements to be replicated. Recently published articles (2011-2013) were significantly more likely to report measuring QOL, compared with earlier articles. CONCLUSIONS: Quality of life of pets undergoing cancer treatment is largely unreported and cannot be meaningfully compared across treatments or disease states using the existing literature. Reliable, validated instruments are needed to facilitate the measurement and comparison of pet QOL in veterinary cancer research. Consistent reporting practices could improve transparency and interpretation of QOL results.  
  Address School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2014/10/14  
  ISSN 1939-1676 (Electronic) 0891-6640 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes MEDLINE and CAB Abstracts searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 794 Serial 2782  
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Author (up) Goggs, R.; Brainard, B.; de Laforcade, A.M.; Flatland, B.; Hanel, R.; McMichael, M.; Wiinberg, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Partnership on Rotational ViscoElastic Test Standardization (PROVETS): Evidence-based guidelines on rotational viscoelastic assays in veterinary medicine Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Journal of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care (San Antonio, Tex. : 2001) Abbreviated Journal J Vet Emerg Crit Care (San Antonio)  
  Volume 24 Issue 1 Pages 1-22  
  Keywords Animals; Europe; Evidence-Based Medicine/standards; Great Britain; North America; Reference Standards; Thrombelastography/methods; Thrombelastography/standards; Thrombelastography/veterinary; Veterinary Medicine/standards  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To systematically examine the evidence relating to the performance of rotational viscoelastic testing in companion animals, to develop assay guidelines, and to identify knowledge gaps. DESIGN: Multiple questions were considered within 5 parent domains, specifically system comparability, sample handling, assay activation and test protocol, definitions and data reporting, and nonstandard assays. Standardized, systematic evaluation of the literature was performed. Relevant articles were categorized according to level of evidence and assessed for quality. Consensus was developed regarding conclusions for application of concepts to clinical practice. SETTING: Academic and referral veterinary medical centers. RESULTS: Databases searched included Medline, Commonwealth Agricultural Bureaux abstracts, and Google Scholar. Worksheets were prepared evaluating 28 questions across the 5 domains and generating 84 assay guidelines. CONCLUSIONS: Evidence-based guidelines for the performance of thromboelastography in companion animals were generated through this process. Some of these guidelines are well supported while others will benefit from additional evidence. Many knowledge gaps were identified and future work should be directed to address these gaps and to objectively evaluate the impact of these guidelines on assay comparability within and between centers.  
  Address From the Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, 14853.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2014/01/16  
  ISSN 1476-4431 (Electronic) 1476-4431 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes MEDLINE, CAB Abstracts and Google Scholar searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1189 Serial 2683  
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Author (up) Gonzales, H.K.; O'Reilly, M.; Lang, R.; Sigafoos, J.; Lancioni, G.; Kajian, M.; Kuhn, M.; Longino, D.; Rojeski, L.; Watkins, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Research involving anxiety in non-human primates has potential implications for the assessment and treatment of anxiety in autism spectrum disorder: A translational literature review Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Developmental Neurorehabilitation Abbreviated Journal Dev Neurorehabil  
  Volume Epublication ahead of print Issue Pages  
  Keywords Primates; Macaques; Chimpanzees; Marmosets  
  Abstract Objective: The purpose of this translational review (i.e. moving from basic primate research toward possible human applications) was to summarize non-human primate literature on anxiety to inform the development of future assessments of anxiety in non-verbal individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Methods: Systematic searches of databases identified 67 studies that met inclusion criteria. Each study was analysed and summarised in terms of (a) strategies used to evoke anxiety, (b) non-verbal behavioural indicators of anxiety and (c) physiological indicators of anxiety. Results: Eighteen strategies were used to evoke anxiety, 48 non-verbal behavioural indicators and 17 physiological indicators of anxiety were measured. Conclusions: A number of the strategies used with non-human primates, if modified carefully, could be considered in the ongoing effort to study anxiety in individuals with ASD. Potential applications to the assessment of anxiety in humans with ASD are discussed.  
  Address Department of Special Education, The University of Texas at Austin , Austin, TX , USA .  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2014/07/25  
  ISSN 1751-8431 (Electronic) 1751-8423 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PrimateLit and MEDLINE searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1248 Serial 2736  
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Author (up) Gootwine, E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Meta-analysis of morphometric parameters of late-gestation fetal sheep developed under natural and artificial constraints Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Journal of Animal Science Abbreviated Journal J Anim Sci  
  Volume 91 Issue 1 Pages 111-119  
  Keywords Animals; Crown-Rump Length; Female; Fetal Weight/physiology; Fetus/anatomy & histology; Litter Size; Pregnancy; Pregnancy, Animal; Sheep/embryology; Sheep/growth & development  
  Abstract A meta-analysis was performed to study the relationship between ovine fetal BW and body length during the last month of pregnancy in sheep gestated under normal conditions and under different natural and experimental maternal- placental- and fetal- directed constraints. Means of crown-rump length (CRL) and BW records, as well as means of calculated G index (GI, BW/CRL1.5), body mass index (BMI, BW/CRL2.0), and Ponderal index (PI, BW/CRL3.0) of 195 nontreated and 160 treated groups of lambs from 131 studies were investigated by ANOVA. the GI is a novel BW-body length index developed for sheep fetuses and newborn lambs. The analysis included the effects of study (n=131), treatment (n=38), average litter size (1 to 3), and days in pregnancy (120 d to lambing). The morphometric parameters were obtained on average on d 139 of gestation, when lambs in the nontreated groups averaged 0.50 m for CRL and 4.20 kg for BW. applying the different treatments caused substantial variation in fetal BW (from 2.5 to 4.9 kg), and somewhat less variation in fetal CRL (0.41 to 0.55 m), reflecting ovine fetal ability to adapt its growth to a variety of natural and experimental constraints. Some treatments affected (P<0.05) the fetal BW-body length relationship, as clearly reflected by the GI and BMI, but not by the PI. litter size and days in pregnancy had effects (P<0.05) on all variables. It was concluded that the severity of fetal intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) in the case of multifetus pregnancies is comparable with the IUGR effects caused by experimentally induced fetal growth-inhibiting interventions, and that GI may be superior to BMI and PI in detecting interference with ovine fetal body proportion.  
  Address Institute of Animal Science, Agricultural Research Organization, The Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel. gootwine@agri.gov.il  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2013/02/14  
  ISSN 1525-3163 (Electronic) 0021-8812 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, CAB (Abstracts?) and AGRICOLA searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 883 Serial 2437  
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Author (up) Gordon, J.L.; Leblanc, S.J.; Duffield, T.F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Ketosis treatment in lactating dairy cattle Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Veterinary Clinics of North America. Food Animal Practice Abbreviated Journal Vet Clin North Am Food Anim Pract  
  Volume 29 Issue 2 Pages 433-445  
  Keywords Cattle; Ketosis; Propylene glycol  
  Abstract This article provides an update on ketosis treatment regimens. The ketosis treatment literature is reviewed and the findings are summarized. Current treatment recommendations and areas for future research are provided.  
  Address Department of Population Medicine, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, 2509 Stewart Building (#45), Guelph, Ontario N1G2W1, Canada. jgordo04@uoguelph.ca  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2013/07/03  
  ISSN 1558-4240 (Electronic) 0749-0720 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes CAB (Abstracts), PubMed, Agricola and Google Scholar searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1159 Serial 2655  
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Author (up) Gostelow, R.; Forcada, Y.; Graves, T.; Church, D.; Niessen, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Systematic review of feline diabetic remission: Separating fact from opinion Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Veterinary Journal (London, England : 1997) Abbreviated Journal Vet J  
  Volume 202 Issue 2 Pages 208-21  
  Keywords Cats; Diabetes  
  Abstract It is increasingly recognised that diabetic remission is possible in the cat. This systematic review, following Cochrane Collaboration (CC) guidelines, critically appraises the level of evidence on factors influencing remission rate and factors predicting remission. A systematic online, bibliographic search and reference list examination was conducted. A level of evidence was assigned to each identified article by five internists using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale for follow-up, cohort, case-series and case-control studies, the CC's risk of bias tool for trials and the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care Group risk of bias criteria for before and after trials. Twenty-two studies were included in the review, assessing influence of pharmaceutical intervention (n = 14) and diet (n = 4), as well as diagnostic tests (n = 9) and feline patient characteristics (n = 5) as predictors of remission. The current level of evidence was found to be moderate to poor. Common sources of bias included lack of randomisation and blinding among trials, and many studies were affected by small sample size. Failure to provide criteria for the diagnosis of diabetes, or diabetic remission, and poor control of confounding factors were frequent causes of poor study design. Addressing these factors would significantly strengthen future research and ultimately allow meta-analyses to provide an excellent level of evidence. No single factor predicts remission and successful remission has been documented with a variety of insulin types and protocols. Dietary carbohydrate reduction might be beneficial, but requires further study. A lack of well-designed trials prevents reliable remission rate comparison. Factors associated with remission resemble those in human medicine and support the hypothesis that reversal of glucotoxicity is a major underlying mechanism for feline diabetic remission.  
  Address Department of Clinical Sciences and Services, The Royal Veterinary College, Hawkshead Lane, Hatfield, Hertfordshire AL9 7TA, UK. Electronic address: rgostelow@rvc.ac.uk. Department of Clinical Sciences and Services, The Royal Veterinary College, Hawkshead Lane, Hatfield, Hertfordshire AL9 7TA, UK. Department of Veterinary Clinical Medicine, University of Illinois, 1008 W Hazelwood Drive, Urbana, IL 61802, USA. Department of Clinical Sciences and Services, The Royal Veterinary College, Hawkshead Lane, Hatfield, Hertfordshire AL9 7TA, UK; Institute for Cellular Medicine, Diabetes Research Group, Newcastle Medical School, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Tyne and Wear NE2 4HH, UK.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2014/10/15  
  ISSN 1532-2971 (Electronic) 1090-0233 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, CAB Direct (CAB Abstracts?) and Web of Science searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1268 Serial 2756  
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Author (up) Goulart, V.D.; Azevedo, P.G.; van de Schepop, J.A.; Teixeira, C.P.; Barcante, L.; Azevedo, C.S.; Young, R.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title GAPs in the study of zoo and wild animal welfare Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication Zoo Biology Abbreviated Journal Zoo Biol  
  Volume 28 Issue 6 Pages 561-573  
  Keywords Animal Welfare/history/standards/trends; Animals; Animals, Wild; Animals, Zoo; Bibliometrics; Databases, Bibliographic; History, 20th Century; History, 21st Century; Journal Impact Factor  
  Abstract To investigate the science of animal welfare for zoo and wild animals in the period from 1966 to 2007, we conducted a bibliometric analysis of abstracts downloaded from The Web of Science((c)) database using the keyword combination “Animal welfare, Zoo* and wild” in the topic field. In total we downloaded 1,125 abstracts, which were classified into the following categories: year of publication; environment of the study (e.g., zoo) or theoretical; area of knowledge (e.g., conservation in situ); number of experimental animals used; species; addresses of authors; taxonomic classification; publication language; journal name; number of citations received. Since 1990, there has been a rapid increase in the number of articles published in this area of animal welfare. One worrying result was that published articles were predominately of a theoretical nature (58.65%, N=563). Most of the articles were published by authors either in Europe (47.43%, N=480) or North America (37.65%, N=381) and written in English (87.71%, N=971). The majority of experimental studies were conducted with mammals (75.92%, N=391), and had small sample sizes (N=7 for zoo-based studies). In terms of impact factor (IF), the journals in this study had a median factor equivalent to that for the area of biological sciences (median IF=1.013). Little knowledge cross-over from farm animal welfare was found (only four articles) in this study. In conclusion, zoo and wild animal welfare as a science may benefit from a greater interaction with farm animal welfare.  
  Address Conservation, Ecology and Animal Behaviour Group, 30535-610 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2009/10/10  
  ISSN 1098-2361 (Electronic) 0733-3188 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Web of Science searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 874 Serial 2438  
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Author (up) Gozalo-Marcilla, M.; Gasthuys, F.; Schauvliege, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Partial intravenous anaesthesia in the horse: a review of intravenous agents used to supplement equine inhalation anaesthesia. Part 2: opioids and alpha-2 adrenoceptor agonists Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Vet Anaesth Analg Abbreviated Journal Veterinary anaesthesia and analgesia  
  Volume 42 Issue 1 Pages 1-16  
  Keywords Horses; [Indexed using CAB Thesaurus terms]  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To review the literature with regard to the use of different intravenous agents as supplements to inhalational anaesthesia in horses. The Part 2 of this review will focus in the use of opioids and alpha2 -agonists. DATABASES USED: Pubmed and Web of Science. Search terms: horse, inhalant anaesthesia, balanced anaesthesia, partial intravenous anaesthesia, opioids, morphine, pethidine, butorphanol, methadone, fentanyl, alfentanil, remifentanil, sufentanil, xylazine, romifidine, detomidine, medetomidine and dexmedetomidine. CONCLUSIONS: Different drugs and their combinations can be administered systemically in anaesthetized horses aiming to reduce the amount of the volatile agent while improving the recovery qualities and providing a multimodal analgesic approach. However, full studies as to whether these techniques improve cardiopulmonary status are not always available and potential disadvantages should also be considered.  
  Address Department of Surgery and Anaesthesia of Domestic Animals, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ghent University, Merelbeke, Belgium.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2014/07/06  
  ISSN 1467-2995 (Electronic) 1467-2987 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Pubmed and Web of Science searched. Database record copyright CAB International 2010 Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1330 Serial 2807  
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Author (up) Granger, N.; Smith, P.M.; Jeffery, N.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Clinical findings and treatment of non-infectious meningoencephalomyelitis in dogs: a systematic review of 457 published cases from 1962 to 2008 Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication Veterinary Journal (London, England : 1997) Abbreviated Journal Vet J  
  Volume 184 Issue 3 Pages 290-297  
  Keywords Age Factors; Animals; Diagnosis, Differential; Dog Diseases/pathology/therapy; Dogs; Female; Immunotherapy/veterinary; Male; Meningoencephalitis/pathology/therapy/veterinary; Patient Selection; Sex Factors  
  Abstract Non-infectious meningoencephalomyelitis (NIME) presents clinicians with diagnostic problems because specific diagnosis requires histopathological examination of central nervous system (CNS) tissue. In the absence of a precise diagnosis, clinicians refer instead to 'meningoencephalomyelitis of unknown origin' (MUO). This article compares published data on histopathologically diagnosed disease (granulomatous meningoencephalomyelitis and necrotising encephalitis) with information available on the clinically-defined category of MUO. Small, middle-aged female dogs are most commonly affected by all types of NIME, but there is considerable overlap in diagnostic parameters of these diseases. Future clinical trials must aim to compare prospectively two or more randomly allocated treatments and to include pre-trial power calculations. This article provides the necessary background information to permit rational patient selection on clinical presentation alone, rather than requiring CNS biopsy, thus maximising patient recruitment whilst minimising heterogeneity.  
  Address Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge, CB3 0ES, UK.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2009/05/05  
  ISSN 1532-2971 (Electronic) 1090-0233 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 675 Serial 2439  
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Author (up) Gray, M.E.; Cameron, E.Z. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Does contraceptive treatment in wildlife result in side effects? A review of quantitative and anecdotal evidence Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication Reproduction (Cambridge, England) Abbreviated Journal Reproduction  
  Volume 139 Issue 1 Pages 45-55  
  Keywords Animals; Animals, Wild/immunology/physiology/surgery; Behavior, Animal/drug effects/physiology; Contraception/adverse effects/methods/veterinary; Contraception, Immunologic/adverse effects/veterinary; Contraceptive Agents/adverse effects/pharmacology; Contraceptive Devices/adverse effects/veterinary; Female; Male; Population/genetics; Sterilization, Reproductive/adverse effects/veterinary  
  Abstract The efficacy of contraceptive treatments has been extensively tested, and several formulations are effective at reducing fertility in a range of species. However, these formulations should minimally impact the behavior of individuals and populations before a contraceptive is used for population manipulation, but these effects have received less attention. Potential side effects have been identified theoretically and we reviewed published studies that have investigated side effects on behavior and physiology of individuals or population-level effects, which provided mixed results. Physiological side effects were most prevalent. Most studies reported a lack of secondary effects, but were usually based on qualitative data or anecdotes. A meta-analysis on quantitative studies of side effects showed that secondary effects consistently occur across all categories and all contraceptive types. This contrasts with the qualitative studies, suggesting that anecdotal reports are insufficient to investigate secondary impacts of contraceptive treatment. We conclude that more research is needed to address fundamental questions about secondary effects of contraceptive treatment and experiments are fundamental to conclusions. In addition, researchers are missing a vital opportunity to use contraceptives as an experimental tool to test the influence of reproduction, sex and fertility on the behavior of wildlife species.  
  Address Department of Animal Biotechnology, Program in Ecology, Evolution and Conservation Biology, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557, USA. meeghang@unr.nevada.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2009/08/07  
  ISSN 1741-7899 (Electronic) 1470-1626 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Web of Science searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 676 Serial 2440  
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Author (up) Greig, J.D.; Waddell, L.; Wilhelm, B.; Wilkins, W.; Bucher, O.; Parker, S.; Rajic, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The efficacy of interventions applied during primary processing on contamination of beef carcasses with Escherichia coli : a systematic review-meta-analysis of the published research Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Food Control Abbreviated Journal Food Contr  
  Volume 27 Issue 2 Pages 385-397  
  Keywords Meat Produce [QQ030]; Information and Documentation [CC300]; Techniques and Methodology [ZZ900]; Food Processing (General) [QQ100]; Food Contamination, Residues and Toxicology [QQ200]; Food Service [QQ700]; carcasses; contamination; cooling; data analysis; databases; disease prevalence; effects; food safety; meat; meta-analysis; methodology; pasteurization; pathogens; processing; research; reviews; simulation models; steam; Escherichia; Escherichia coli; Enterobacteriaceae; Enterobacteriales; Gammaproteobacteria; Proteobacteria; Bacteria; prokaryotes; bacterium; data banks; E. coli; methods; pasteurizing; studies; cattle; [Indexed using CAB Thesaurus terms]  
  Abstract Results from primary processing intervention strategies for Escherichia coli reduction on beef carcasses are often inconsistent or contradictory. Our objective was to identify, critically evaluate and synthesize published intervention research reporting treatment efficacy at the abattoir on E. coli contamination of beef carcasses using systematic review (SR)-meta-analysis (MA) methodology to recommend effective practices and determine knowledge gaps. Four electronic bibliographic databases were searched for intervention studies in English. Two independent reviewers performed all SR steps. Risk of bias was assessed and separate random-effects MAs conducted on datasets. A stochastic simulation model using MA effect estimates evaluated combined effects of potable water carcass wash, steam or hot water pasteurization and a 24 h dry chill. The SR-MA included 36 citations (202 trials). Although 44 interventions were identified at nine stages of processing, MA was precluded for most due to small study numbers, high risk of bias and heterogeneity. Reduced odds of generic E. coli carcass contamination demonstrated by MA: final carcass washing (OR 0.56, CI: 0.41-0.77), pasteurization (OR 0.09, CI: 0.06-0.14) and 24 h dry chilling (OR 0.17, CI: 0.11-0.24). Combining effects of potable water carcass wash, steam or hot water pasteurization and a 24 h dry chill, assuming no additional contamination and all variables constant, resulted in a reduced prevalence of 1.22% (CI 0.17, 3.57). The predicted risk difference in carcass contamination was 14, 42 and 35 per 100 carcasses upon application of final wash, carcass pasteurization and 24 h dry chill, respectively. Existing research indicates that final wash, hot water or steam pasteurization, and dry chilling are beneficial for reducing the contamination of beef carcasses with generic E. coli and potentially pathogenic strains.  
  Address Laboratory for Foodborne Zoonoses, Public Health Agency of Canada, Guelph, Ontario, N1G 5B2, Canada. judy.greig@phac-aspc.gc.ca lisa.waddell@phac-asp.gc.ca bwilhelm@uoguelph.ca wendy.wilkins@gov.sk.ca obucher@uoguelph.ca sarah.parker@usask.ca andrijana.rajic@phac-aspc.gc.ca  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0956-7135 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes AGRICOLA, CAB (Abstracts?), PubMed and Food Science and Technology Abstracts searched. Database record copyright CAB International 2010 Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 532 Serial 2441  
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Author (up) Grissett, G.P.; White, B.J.; Larson, R.L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Structured Literature Review of Responses of Cattle to Viral and Bacterial Pathogens Causing Bovine Respiratory Disease Complex Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication J Vet Intern Med Abbreviated Journal Journal of veterinary internal medicine / American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine  
  Volume 29 Epublication ahead of print Issue 3 Pages 770-780  
  Keywords Cattle  
  Abstract Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is an economically important disease of cattle and continues to be an intensely studied topic. However, literature summarizing the time between pathogen exposure and clinical signs, shedding, and seroconversion is minimal. A structured literature review of the published literature was performed to determine cattle responses (time from pathogen exposure to clinical signs, shedding, and seroconversion) in challenge models using common BRD viral and bacterial pathogens. After review a descriptive analysis of published studies using common BRD pathogen challenge studies was performed. Inclusion criteria were single pathogen challenge studies with no treatment or vaccination evaluating outcomes of interest: clinical signs, shedding, and seroconversion. Pathogens of interest included: bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BHV-1), parainfluenza-3 virus, bovine respiratory syncytial virus, Mannheimia haemolytica, Mycoplasma bovis, Pastuerella multocida, and Histophilus somni. Thirty-five studies and 64 trials were included for analysis. The median days to the resolution of clinical signs after BVDV challenge was 15 and shedding was not detected on day 12 postchallenge. Resolution of BHV-1 shedding resolved on day 12 and clinical signs on day 12 postchallenge. Bovine respiratory syncytial virus ceased shedding on day 9 and median time to resolution of clinical signs was on day 12 postchallenge. M. haemolytica resolved clinical signs 8 days postchallenge. This literature review and descriptive analysis can serve as a resource to assist in designing challenge model studies and potentially aid in estimation of duration of clinical disease and shedding after natural pathogen exposure.  
  Address Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2015/05/02  
  ISSN 1939-1676 (Electronic) 0891-6640 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, CAB (Abstracts?) and Agricola searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1334 Serial 2810  
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Author (up) Guatteo, R.; Seegers, H.; Taurel, A.F.; Joly, A.; Beaudeau, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Prevalence of Coxiella burnetii infection in domestic ruminants: a critical review Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Veterinary Microbiology Abbreviated Journal Vet Microbiol  
  Volume 149 Issue 1-2 Pages 1-16  
  Keywords Animals; Cattle/microbiology; Cattle Diseases/epidemiology; Coxiella burnetii/isolation & purification; Goat Diseases/microbiology; Goats/microbiology; Prevalence; Q Fever/epidemiology/veterinary; Sheep/microbiology; Sheep Diseases/epidemiology; Cattle; Goats; Sheep  
  Abstract Reliable detection of Coxiella burnetii is a critical point for the control of the spread of this zoonotic disease (Q fever), ruminants being considered as the main source for human infection as confirmed by the recent human outbreak in the Netherlands since 2007. Considering both public and animal health, providing consolidated prevalence data could be relevant within the decision process of public policy makers or producers organizations. The objective of this study was to conduct a critical review of the literature focused on the prevalence of C. burnetii infection at animal, herd and within-herd levels in cattle, goat and sheep. A qualitative assessment of the 69 selected publications, based on the analysis of the sampling frame and testing procedures, was also performed. While the number of publications increased recently, major methodological issues were still evidenced. These critical issues were related to (i) the absence of description of the sampling strategy and (ii) the lack of sensitivity of the testing procedure. The lack of well designed studies makes not possible to estimate accurately the current prevalence of the infection. Nevertheless, the literature review reported the detection of C. burnetii infection in the all 5 continents with a wide range whatever the species. The apparent prevalence was slightly higher in cattle (20.0% and 37.7% of mean apparent prevalence at animal and herd level respectively) than in small ruminants (around 15.0% and 25% respectively for animal and herd level in sheep and goat). The present conclusions and the current situation support the persistent need of conducting well designed studies, aiming at estimating the true prevalence of C. burnetii infection in the three main domestic ruminant species.  
  Address INRA, UMR 1300 Bio-Agression, Epidemiologie et Analyse de Risque, Nantes F-44307, France. raphael.guatteo@oniris-nantes.fr  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2010/12/01  
  ISSN 1873-2542 (Electronic) 0378-1135 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes MEDLINE and PubMed searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 452 Serial 2442  
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Author (up) Guldemond, R.A.R.; Purdon, A.; van Aarde, R.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A systematic review of elephant impact across Africa Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication PLoS One Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 12 Issue 6 Pages e0178935  
  Keywords Elephants; Environment; Africa  
  Abstract Contradictory findings among scientific studies that address a particular issue may impede the conversion of science to management implementation. A systematic review of peer-reviewed studies to generate a single outcome may overcome this problem. The contentious topic of the impact that a megaherbivore such as the savanna elephant have for other species and their environment can benefit from such an approach. After some 68 years, 367 peer-reviewed papers covered the topic and 51 of these papers provided sufficient data to be included in a meta-analysis. We separated the direct impact that elephants had on trees and herbs from the indirect effects on other vertebrates, invertebrates, and soil properties. Elephants have an impact on tree structure and abundance but no overall negative cascading effects for species that share space with them. Primary productivity explained a small amount of variation of elephant impact on vegetation. Elephant numbers (density), study duration, rainfall, tree cover, and the presence of artificial water and fences failed to describe patterns of impact. We conclude that published information do not support the calls made for artificially manipulating elephant numbers to ameliorate elephant impact, and call for the management of space use by elephants to maintain savanna heterogeneity.  
  Address Conservation Ecology Research Unit, Department of Zoology and Entomology, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2017/06/08  
  ISSN 1932-6203 (Electronic) 1932-6203 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Biological Sciences, Scopus, Zoological Record and Wildlife Ecology and Studies Worldwide searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1435 Serial 2893  
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Author (up) Gulin, J.E.; Rocco, D.M.; Garcia-Bournissen, F. doi  openurl
  Title Quality of Reporting and Adherence to ARRIVE Guidelines in Animal Studies for Chagas Disease Preclinical Drug Research: A Systematic Review Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases Abbreviated Journal PLoS Negl Trop Dis  
  Volume 9 Issue 11 Pages e0004194  
  Keywords ARRIVE; Animal models  
  Abstract Publication of accurate and detailed descriptions of methods in research articles involving animals is essential for health scientists to accurately interpret published data, evaluate results and replicate findings. Inadequate reporting of key aspects of experimental design may reduce the impact of studies and could act as a barrier to translation of research findings. Reporting of animal use must be as comprehensive as possible in order to take advantage of every study and every animal used. Animal models are essential to understanding and assessing new chemotherapy candidates for Chagas disease pathology, a widespread parasitic disease with few treatment options currently available. A systematic review was carried out to compare ARRIVE guidelines recommendations with information provided in publications of preclinical studies for new anti-Trypanosoma cruzi compounds. A total of 83 publications were reviewed. Before ARRIVE guidelines, 69% of publications failed to report any macroenvironment information, compared to 57% after ARRIVE publication. Similar proportions were observed when evaluating reporting of microenvironmental information (56% vs. 61%). Also, before ARRIVE guidelines publication, only 13% of papers described animal gender, only 18% specified microbiological status and 13% reported randomized treatment assignment, among other essential information missing or incomplete. Unfortunately, publication of ARRIVE guidelines did not seem to enhance reporting quality, compared to papers appeared before ARRIVE publication. Our results suggest that there is a strong need for the scientific community to improve animal use description, animal models employed, transparent reporting and experiment design to facilitate its transfer and application to the affected human population. Full compliance with ARRIVE guidelines, or similar animal research reporting guidelines, would be an excellent start in this direction.  
  Address Servicio de Parasitologia y Enfermedad de Chagas, Hospital de Ninos Dr. Ricardo Gutierrez, Buenos Aires, Argentina. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Buenos Aires, Argentina. Agencia Nacional de Promocion Cientifica y Tecnologica, Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnologia e Innovacion Productiva, Buenos Aires, Argentina.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2015/11/21  
  ISSN 1935-2735 (Electronic) 1935-2727 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1368 Serial 2838  
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Author (up) Guyader, J.; Eugene, M.; Noziere, P.; Morgavi, D.P.; Doreau, M.; Martin, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Influence of rumen protozoa on methane emission in ruminants: a meta-analysis approach Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Animal : an international journal of animal bioscience Abbreviated Journal Animal  
  Volume 8 Issue 11 Pages 1816-25  
  Keywords Cattle; Sheep; Goats  
  Abstract A meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the effects of protozoa concentration on methane emission from ruminants. A database was built from 59 publications reporting data from 76 in vivo experiments. The experiments included in the database recorded methane production and rumen protozoa concentration measured on the same groups of animals. Quantitative data such as diet chemical composition, rumen fermentation and microbial parameters, and qualitative information such as methane mitigation strategies were also collected. In the database, 31% of the experiments reported a concomitant reduction of both protozoa concentration and methane emission (g/kg dry matter intake). Nearly all of these experiments tested lipids as methane mitigation strategies. By contrast, 21% of the experiments reported a variation in methane emission without changes in protozoa numbers, indicating that methanogenesis is also regulated by other mechanisms not involving protozoa. Experiments that used chemical compounds as an antimethanogenic treatment belonged to this group. The relationship between methane emission and protozoa concentration was studied with a variance-covariance model, with experiment as a fixed effect. The experiments included in the analysis had a within-experiment variation of protozoa concentration higher than 5.3 log10 cells/ml corresponding to the average s.e.m. of the database for this variable. To detect potential interfering factors for the relationship, the influence of several qualitative and quantitative secondary factors was tested. This meta-analysis showed a significant linear relationship between methane emission and protozoa concentration: methane (g/kg dry matter intake)=-30.7+8.14xprotozoa (log10 cells/ml) with 28 experiments (91 treatments), residual mean square error=1.94 and adjusted R 2=0.90. The proportion of butyrate in the rumen positively influenced the least square means of this relationship.  
  Address INRA, UMR1213 Herbivores, F-63122 Saint-Genes-Champanelle, France.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2014/07/31  
  ISSN 1751-732X (Electronic) 1751-7311 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Web of Knowledge (Web of Science?), ScienceDirect and Google Scholar searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1243 Serial 2732  
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