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Author (up) Faridi, A.; Gitoee, A.; France, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A meta-analysis of the effects of nonphytate phosphorus on broiler performance and tibia ash concentration Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Poultry Science Abbreviated Journal Poult Sci  
  Volume 94 Issue 11 Pages 2753-2762  
  Keywords chickens; poultry; phosphorus; diet; nutirtion  
  Abstract Decreasing feed costs while maintaining broiler performance at a high level with minimal environmental pollution has become a major challenge for poultry nutritionists in recent years. In this regard, phosphorus (P) is a nutrient that is problematic. To overcome this, a comprehensive knowledge of the responses of broilers to P is needed and the factors that affect its utilization need better understanding. For this purpose, a meta-analysis was conducted using results published in the literature on the responses of broilers to different levels of nonphytate P (NPP), calcium (Ca), microbial phytase (MP), and vitamin D3 or its metabolites (VD). The effects of Ca, MP, and VD on NPP requirements were investigated. Results showed significant (P </= 0.0001) linear and quadratic effects of NPP on all the responses, viz. average daily gain (ADG), feed intake (FI), feed efficiency (FE), and tibia ash concentration (TA). Results showed the negative effect of high Ca levels on all investigated responses, although these deleterious effects were alleviated when levels of NPP were increased or MP and/or VD added. Synergistic effects of MP and VD on FI and TA were observed. Best performance for all responses was found when MP and VD were added to low or moderate levels of Ca and NPP. Optimization showed higher levels of NPP are required to maximize TA compared to ADG, FI, and FE. Based on our analysis, requirements for NPP were affected mostly by Ca (increased) and MP (decreased), and, to a lesser extent, VD (inconsistent).  
  Address Center of Excellence in the Animal Sciences Department, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad, Iran, 91775-1163 ako_faridi@yahoo.com. Department of Animal Science, College of Agriculture, University of Kurdistan, PO Box 416, Sanandaj, Iran. Centre for Nutrition Modeling, Department of Animal and Poultry Science, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, N1G 2W1, Canada.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2015/10/27  
  ISSN 0032-5791 (Print) 0032-5791 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Scopus searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1414 Serial 2874  
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Author (up) Farnham, M.W.; Norby, B.; Goldsmith, T.J.; Wells, S.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Meta-analysis of field studies on bovine tuberculosis skin tests in United States cattle herds Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Preventive Veterinary Medicine Abbreviated Journal Prev Vet Med  
  Volume 103 Issue 2-3 Pages 234-242  
  Keywords Animals; Cattle; Female; Prevalence; Sensitivity and Specificity; Tuberculin Test/methods/veterinary; Tuberculosis, Bovine/diagnosis/epidemiology/immunology; United States/epidemiology  
  Abstract Our objective was to summarize information on the diagnostic accuracy, in terms of test sensitivity (Se) and specificity (Sp), for bovine tuberculosis (bTb) tuberculin skin tests as currently used in the United States. Meta-analyses including Se and Sp estimates from field studies of bTb tuberculin tests conducted in North American cattle were conducted to provide a distribution of estimates and central tendency for Se and Sp of the caudal fold tuberculin (CFT) and serial interpretation of the CFT and comparative cervical tuberculin (CFT-CCT) tests. In total, 12 estimates for CFT and CFT-CCT test Se and Sp were identified from seven publications matching inclusion criteria. Estimates for CFT test Se ranged from 80.4% to 93.0% and CFT test Sp from 89.2% to 95.2%. Estimates for CFT-CCT test Se ranged from 74.4% to 88.4% and CFT-CCT test Sp ranged from 97.3% to 98.6%. These distributions of test Se and Sp are intended to provide a more realistic representation for U.S. bTb skin tests than previously reported. Estimation and discussion of herd-level CFT and CFT-CCT test parameters is also included. These results should be considered at the herd and individual animal level when evaluating results from tuberculin skin test results in North American cattle herds.  
  Address Center for Animal Health and Food Safety, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN 55108, USA. farn0032@umn.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2011/09/17  
  ISSN 1873-1716 (Electronic) 0167-5877 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed and CAB (Abstracts?) searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 841 Serial 2416  
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Author (up) Fechter-Leggett, E.D.; Like, B.; Vigneau, D.L.; Jarvin, L.; Lindenmayer, J.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Education of veterinary medical and other public health providers: linking interventions with health outcomes Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Journal of Veterinary Medical Education Abbreviated Journal J Vet Med Educ  
  Volume 38 Issue 2 Pages 171-183  
  Keywords Disaster Planning; Education, Veterinary/methods; Humans; Logistic Models; Outcome Assessment (Health Care); Program Development; Public Health/education; United States  
  Abstract A systematic literature review was performed to summarize the nature, implementation, outcomes, and long-term impacts of previously instituted interventions and programs aimed at educating veterinary public health providers. A logic model was developed to direct the literature search strategy, provide a framework for evaluating the relationship between veterinary public health professional education and their associated population health outcomes, and guide future training development and recommendations for the education of veterinary health professionals. Our literature review indicates that there is a relative lack of published literature that connects veterinary public health educational interventions to population health outcomes. Reasons for the lack of evidence to connect educational programs and population health outcomes include the evaluation of outcomes on a short-term rather than intermediate- or long-term basis, a lack of experimental studies, and infrequent grounding in population health or educational theory. Future intervention recommendations as suggested in the reviewed articles are also summarized.  
  Address Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, Tufts University, North Grafton, MA 01536, USA.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2011/10/26  
  ISSN 0748-321X (Print) 0748-321X (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes AGRICOLA, CAB Abstracts, Cambridge Scientific Abstracts Natural Sciences, Conference Papers Index, Proquest Dissertations and Theses, ERIC, Global Health, GPO, PubMed, PAIS International, Sociological Abstracts and OCLC WorldCat searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 447 Serial 2417  
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Author (up) Fernandez-Silva, J.A.; Correa-Valencia, N.M.; Ramirez, N.F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Systematic review of the prevalence of paratuberculosis in cattle, sheep, and goats in Latin America and the Caribbean Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Tropical Animal Health and Production Abbreviated Journal Trop Anim Health Prod  
  Volume 46 Issue 8 Pages 1321-40  
  Keywords Cattle; Sheep; Goats; Paratuberculosis  
  Abstract Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis causes paratuberculosis or Johne's disease (JD) in domestic ruminants and wild species. The aim of the present study was to systematically review the prevalence of paratuberculosis among farmed animals (cattle, sheep, and goats) in Latin America and the Caribbean. The initial search for existing publications reporting systematic reviews and primary studies was carried out by searching the available databases. For the final selection of studies, an initial screen for basic eligibility and a detailed appraisal of quality were performed. After study selection, the relevant data were extracted. The detailed appraisal generated 24 publications that reported 52 studies, of which 73.1, 11.5, and 15.4 % were from cattle, sheep, and goats, respectively. Thirty-three (63.5 %) of the studies were animal level studies, while 19 (36.5 %) were herd-/flock-level studies. No flock-level studies on prevalence in sheep were found. Studies in Latin American and Caribbean countries revealed an overall prevalence of 16.9 (95 % CI (confidence interval) 13.2-20.5) and 75.8 % (95 % CI 50.1-101.5) in cattle at the animal and herd levels, respectively; the prevalence was 16 % (95 % CI 7.9-24.1) in sheep at the animal level and 4.3 % (95 % CI 1.9-6.8) and 3.7 % (95 % CI 0.1-7.4) in goats at the animal and flock levels, respectively. In general, prevalence results reported by the studies were insufficient to accurately determine the prevalence of paratuberculosis in farmed animals in Latin America and the Caribbean. Several flaws in the design of studies limit the quality of evidence regarding the prevalence of paratuberculosis in the region.  
  Address Epidemiologia y Salud Publica Veterinaria, Centauro, Escuela de Medicina Veterinaria, Facultad de Ciencias Agrarias, Universidad de Antioquia UdeA, Calle 70 No. 52-21, Medellin, Colombia, jorge.fernandez@udea.edu.co.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2014/08/30  
  ISSN 1573-7438 (Electronic) 0049-4747 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Scopus, PubMed, Redalyc, Virtual Health Library and International Association for Paratuberculosis Website searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1251 Serial 2739  
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Author (up) Ferraretto, L.F.; Shaver, R.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of whole-plant corn silage hybrid type on intake, digestion, ruminal fermentation, and lactation performance by dairy cows through a meta-analysis Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Journal of Dairy Science Abbreviated Journal J Dairy Sci  
  Volume 98 Issue 4 Pages 2662-2675  
  Keywords Cattle; Dairy cows  
  Abstract Understanding the effect of whole-plant corn silage (WPCS) hybrids in dairy cattle diets may allow for better decisions on hybrid selection by dairy producers, as well as indicate potential strategies for the seed corn industry with regard to WPCS hybrids. Therefore, the objective of this study was to perform a meta-analysis using literature data on the effects of WPCS hybrid type on intake, digestibility, rumen fermentation, and lactation performance by dairy cows. The meta-analysis was performed using a data set of 162 treatment means from 48 peer-reviewed articles published between 1995 and 2014. Hybrids were divided into 3 categories before analysis. Comparative analysis of WPCS hybrid types differing in stalk characteristics were in 4 categories: conventional, dual-purpose, isogenic, or low-normal fiber digestibility (CONS), brown midrib (BMR), hybrids with greater NDF but lower lignin (%NDF) contents or high in vitro NDF digestibility (HFD), and leafy (LFY). Hybrid types differing in kernel characteristics were in 4 categories: conventional or yellow dent (CONG), NutriDense (ND), high oil (HO), and waxy. Genetically modified (GM) hybrids were compared with their genetically similar non-biotech counterpart (ISO). Except for lower lignin content for BMR and lower starch content for HFD than CONS and LFY, silage nutrient composition was similar among hybrids of different stalk types. A 1.1 kg/d greater intake of DM and 1.5 and 0.05 kg/d greater milk and protein yields, respectively, were observed for BMR compared with CONS and LFY. Likewise, DMI and milk yield were greater for HFD than CONS, but the magnitude of the difference was smaller. Total-tract NDF digestibility was greater, but starch digestibility was reduced, for BMR and HFD compared with CONS or LFY. Silage nutrient composition was similar for hybrids of varied kernel characteristics, except for lower CP and EE content for CONG than ND and HO. Feeding HO WPCS to dairy cows decreased milk fat content and yield and protein content compared with the other kernel-type hybrids. Hybrids varying in kernel characteristics did not affect intake, milk production, or total-tract nutrient digestibilities by lactating dairy cows. Nutrient composition and lactation performance were similar between GM and ISO. Positive effects of BMR and HFD on intake and milk yield were observed for lactating dairy cows, but the reduced total-tract starch digestibility for these hybrids merits further study. Except for negative effects of HO on milk components, differences were minimal among corn silage hybrids differing in kernel type. Feeding GM WPCS did not affect lactation performance by dairy cows.  
  Address Department of Dairy Science, University of Wisconsin, Madison 53706. Department of Dairy Science, University of Wisconsin, Madison 53706. Electronic address: rdshaver@wisc.edu.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2015/02/05  
  ISSN 1525-3198 (Electronic) 0022-0302 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes CAB (?), Google Scholar, PubMed and ScienceDirect searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1315 Serial 2796  
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Author (up) Ferreira, L.; Lisenko, K.; Barros, B.; Zangeronimo, M.; Pereira, L.; Sousa, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Influence of medium-chain triglycerides on consumption and weight gain in rats: a systematic review Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition Abbreviated Journal J Anim Physiol Anim Nutr (Berl)  
  Volume 98 Issue 1 Pages 1-8  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract The use of medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs) has been studied for years in an attempt to elucidate their effects in food intake and body weight in animals. The aim of this study was to determine whether there is evidence that the use of MCT reduces consumption and body weight gain in rats, a species chosen as it has been widely used as an animal model in different surveys. A search of scientific work was performed in November 2011 on two bases: 'Web of Science' and 'PubMed'. The terms sample size and homogeneity, randomisation, food consumption and weight gain, body composition, enzyme activity and hormonal activity in rats were used as selection criteria. Thirteen papers were selected after the refinement of the research. Twelve studies measured weight gain and among these, seven detected a decrease in weight gain and five found no differences. Twelve papers also measured food intake and among these, four detected a decrease in consumption, one detected an increase and seven found no differences. Based on established criteria for the ranking of scientific papers, it is concluded that there is strong evidence that MCTs can effectively reduce the consumption and subsequent weight gain of animals. However, in the long term, there may not be differences in results depending on the phenotypic adaptation of animals to a new metabolic condition.  
  Address Veterinary Medicine Department, Federal University of Lavras, Lavras, Minas Gerais, Brazil.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2013/01/10  
  ISSN 1439-0396 (Electronic) 0931-2439 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed and Web of Science searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 867 Serial 2418  
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Author (up) Filan, S.L.; Llewellyn-Jones, R.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Animal-assisted therapy for dementia: a review of the literature Type Journal Article
  Year 2006 Publication International psychogeriatrics Abbreviated Journal Int Psychogeriatr  
  Volume 18 Issue 4 Pages 597-611  
  Keywords Aged; Alzheimer Disease/psychology/therapy; Animals; Animals, Domestic; Bonding, Human-Pet; Dogs; Fishes; Homes for the Aged; Humans; Nursing Homes; Robotics; Social Behavior  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Animal-assisted therapy (AAT) is gaining popularity as part of therapy programs in residential aged care facilities. Humans and pet dogs respond to quiet interaction with a lowering of blood pressure and an increase in neurochemicals associated with relaxation and bonding. These effects may be of benefit in ameliorating behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD). METHODS: Medline, PsychInfo and CINAHL databases (1960-2005) were searched for papers on AAT or pets and dementia. Publications of controlled trials that measured the effect of AAT for dementia were reviewed. RESULTS: Several small studies suggest that the presence of a dog reduces aggression and agitation, as well as promoting social behavior in people with dementia. One study has shown that aquaria in dining rooms of dementia care units stimulate residents to eat more of their meals and to gain weight but is limited by the small number of facilities studied. There is preliminary evidence that robotic pets may provide pleasure and interest to people with dementia. CONCLUSIONS: Current literature suggests that AAT may ameliorate BPSD, but the duration of the beneficial effect has not been explored. The relative benefits of “resident” versus “visiting” pet dogs are unclear and are confounded by the positive effect of pet interaction on staff or caregivers. Further research on the potential benefits of AAT is recommended.  
  Address Department of Psychological Medicine, University of Sydney, NSW, Australia.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2006/04/28  
  ISSN 1041-6102 (Print) 1041-6102 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes MEDLINE, PsychInfo and CINAHL searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1122 Serial 2419  
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Author (up) Finka, L.R.; Ellis, S.L.; Stavisky, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A critically appraised topic (CAT) to compare the effects of single and multi-cat housing on physiological and behavioural measures of stress in domestic cats in confined environments Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication BMC Veterinary Research Abbreviated Journal BMC Vet Res  
  Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages 73  
  Keywords Animals; Cat Diseases/etiology; Cat Diseases/prevention & control; Cats/physiology; Cats/psychology; Housing, Animal/standards; Stress, Psychological/etiology; Stress, Psychological/prevention & control; Cats  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Domestic cats have evolved from solitary, asocial predators and whilst they may display social behaviours, they can still exist as solitary survivors. Over-population and relinquishment of pet cats are ubiquitous problems worldwide, and rehoming centres (also known as rescues/ shelters) aim to ameliorate this by holding cats in confinement for a variable period until a new home is found. The provision of optimal housing for large numbers of cats in close confinement, such as in rehoming centres, is therefore inherently difficult. Under these conditions there is the potential for individuals to develop signs of physical and psychological ill health, and thus experience compromised welfare. Available information regarding housing practices that maximise welfare currently provides conflicting results, and as a consequence there are no unanimous housing recommendations. The aim of this study was therefore to review the evidence on the impact of single housing compared to multi-cat housing on stress in confined cats, as measured by physiological and/or behavioural outcomes. The review was conducted using a Critically Appraised Topic (CAT) format. A systematic search of electronic databases (CAB Abstracts, Zoological Records and Medline) was carried out to identify peer-reviewed literature comparing single and multi-cat housing in confined environments. RESULTS: A total of 959 papers were initially identified, six of which met sufficient criteria based on their relevance to be included within this review. All of the studies had significant limitations in design and methodology, including a lack of information on how groups were assigned, inconsistent handling and enrichment provision between groups, and lack of information on the socialisation status of cats. CONCLUSIONS: Whilst some studies suggested that single housing may be less stressful for cats, others suggested group housing was less stressful. Several other important factors were however identified as potential mediators of stress within the different housing systems, and recommendations based upon these findings are presented.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2014/03/25  
  ISSN 1746-6148 (Electronic) 1746-6148 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes CAB Abstracts, Zoological Record and MEDLINE searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1210 Serial 2701  
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Author (up) Flatland, B.; Koenigshof, A.M.; Rozanski, E.A.; Goggs, R.; Wiinberg, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Systematic evaluation of evidence on veterinary viscoelastic testing Part 2: Sample acquisition and handling Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Journal of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care (San Antonio, Tex. : 2001) Abbreviated Journal J Vet Emerg Crit Care (San Antonio)  
  Volume 24 Issue 1 Pages 30-36  
  Keywords Animals; Blood Specimen Collection/methods; Blood Specimen Collection/standards; Blood Specimen Collection/veterinary; Cats/blood; Dogs/blood; Horses/blood; Reference Standards; Thrombelastography/instrumentation; Thrombelastography/methods; Thrombelastography/veterinary; Veterinary Medicine/standards; Animals; Dogs; Cats; Horses  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To examine systematically the evidence on sample acquisition and handling for the thrombo elastography (TEG) and rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM) viscoelastic point of care instruments and to identify knowledge gaps. DESIGN: Six questions were considered, addressing sampling site, collection system, anticoagulant, collection procedure, and sample storage. Standardized, systematic evaluation of the literature was performed. Relevant articles were categorized according to level of evidence (LOE). Consensus was developed regarding conclusions for application of concepts to clinical practice. SETTING: Academic and referral veterinary medical centers. RESULTS: PubMed and CAB abstracts were searched. Eighteen papers were initially chosen; 5 of these papers applied to > 1 domain question. Three papers were used to address 2 questions each, and 2 papers were used to address 3 questions each. Most papers were judged LOE 3 (Good or Fair). Two of 5 papers were judged to be the same LOE each time they were used; 2 papers were judged to be LOE 3, Fair for 1 question and 3, Good for a second question; 1 paper used to address 3 questions was judged LOE 3, Good twice and 3, Fair once. Fourteen additional papers were evaluated post hoc during manuscript preparation. CONCLUSIONS: Jugular venipuncture is recommended, but samples from IV catheters can be used. Consistent technique is important for serial sampling, and standardized sampling protocols are recommended for individual centers performing TEG/ROTEM. There is insufficient evidence to recommend use of a specific blood collection system, although use of evacuated blood tubes and 21-Ga or larger needles is suggested. Use of 3.2% buffered sodium citrate in a strict 1:9 ratio of citrate to blood is suggested. Suggested tube draw order is discard/serum, followed by citrate, EDTA, and then heparin. Samples should be held at room temperature for 30 minutes prior to analysis.  
  Address From the Department of Biomedical and Diagnostic Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2014/01/30  
  ISSN 1476-4431 (Electronic) 1476-4431 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed and CAB Abstracts searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1188 Serial 2682  
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Author (up) Fourichon, C.; Seegers, H.; Malher, X. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effect of disease on reproduction in the dairy cow: a meta-analysis Type Journal Article
  Year 2000 Publication Theriogenology Abbreviated Journal Theriogenology  
  Volume 53 Issue 9 Pages 1729-1759  
  Keywords Abomasum/physiopathology; Abortion, Veterinary/physiopathology; Anestrus/physiology; Animals; Cattle; Cattle Diseases/physiopathology; Dystocia/physiopathology/veterinary; Female; Fetal Death/physiopathology/veterinary; Ketosis/physiopathology/veterinary; Male; Mastitis, Bovine/physiopathology; Movement Disorders/physiopathology/veterinary; Ovarian Cysts/physiopathology/veterinary; Parturient Paresis/physiopathology; Placenta, Retained/physiopathology/veterinary; Pregnancy; Reproduction  
  Abstract Effects on reproduction of dystocia, stillbirth, abortion, milk fever, retained placenta, metritis, cystic ovaries, anestrus, ketosis, displaced abomasum, locomotor disorders, and mastitis were reviewed. Papers were considered if they provided quantitative estimates of diseases on days to first estrus, days to first service, conception rate at first service, days from first service to conception, days to conception or days open, calving interval, conception rates at various days post partum (dpp), and number of services per conception or per cow. Only papers in English in peer-reviewed journals were selected for analysis of post 1960 data from intensive dairy regions. Seventy papers fulfilled the selection criteria. Summary estimates of disease effects were calculated according to meta-analysis methods, and study designs were described in detail to identify possible heterogeneity of the results. Stillbirth, milk fever, displaced abomasum and mastitis had no effect on reproduction. Clinical ketosis, dystocia and retained placenta were associated with 2 to 3 more days to first service and with a 4 to 10% lower conception rate at first service, resulting in 6 to 12 more days to conception. Locomotor disorders were associated with an average increase of 12 d to conception, with wide variation depending on lesions and stage of occurrence. Metritis was associated with 7 more days to first service, 20% lower conception rate at first service, resulting in 19 more days to conception. Cystic ovaries were associated with 6 to 11 more days to first service and with 20 to 30 more days to conception. Anestrus was associated with 26 more days to first service and with an 18% lower conception rate at first service, resulting in 41 more days to conception. Abortion was associated with 70 to 80 more days to conception.  
  Address Unit of Animal Health Management, Veterinary School-INRA, Nantes, France. fourichon@vet-nantes.fr  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2000/09/01  
  ISSN 0093-691X (Print) 0093-691X (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes CAB Abstracts searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 667 Serial 2420  
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Author (up) Francoz, D.; Buczinski, S.; Apley, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evidence related to the use of ancillary drugs in bovine respiratory disease (anti-inflammatory and others): are they justified or not? Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Veterinary Clinics of North America. Food Animal Practice Abbreviated Journal Vet Clin North Am Food Anim Pract  
  Volume 28 Issue 1 Pages 23-38, vii-viii  
  Keywords Animals; Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use; Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/therapeutic use; Bovine Respiratory Disease Complex/drug therapy; Cattle; Cattle Diseases/drug therapy; Evidence-Based Medicine; Immunomodulation; Treatment Outcome  
  Abstract The therapeutic approach for bovine respiratory disease (BRD) includes antimicrobial treatment due to the frequent implication of bacteria. The data concerning the use of ancillary drugs (such as anti-inflammatory drugs or immunomodulators) are scant and often are based on experimental models of BRD. The effect of NSAIDs on pulmonary lesions, despite appearing beneficial, remains to be confirmed in well-designed, long-term trials. The impact on weight gain is inconsistent in these studies. This review emphasized the need for articles concerning clinical trials to clearly state study inclusion criteria, and definitions of clinical scores, relapses, and treatment failures to be properly evaluated.  
  Address Departement des Sciences Cliniques, Faculte de Medecine Veterinaire, St-Hyacinthe, Universite de Montreal, CP 5000, J2S 7C6 Quebec, Canada. david.francoz@umontreal.ca  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2012/03/01  
  ISSN 1558-4240 (Electronic) 0749-0720 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes MEDLINE and CAB Abstracts searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 543 Serial 2421  
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Author (up) Francoz, D.; Wellemans, V.; Roy, J.P.; Lacasse, P.; Ordonez-Iturriaga, A.; Labelle, F.; Dufour, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Non-antibiotic approaches at drying-off for treating and preventing intramammary infections: a protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Animal Health Research Reviews Abbreviated Journal Anim Health Res Rev  
  Volume 17 Issue 2 Pages 169-175  
  Keywords Cattle; Cows; Bovine; Dairy cows; Mastitis; Drying off; Antimicrobials  
  Abstract Intramammary infection (IMI) treatment and prevention at drying-off is one of the leading causes for using antimicrobials on dairy farms. The objective of the current paper is to describe the protocol used for conducting a systematic review of the literature on non-antibiotic strategies that can be used on dairy cows at dry off to treat and prevent IMI. Relevant literature will be identified using a combination of database search strategies and iterative screening of references. To be included in the review, articles will have to: (1) be published after 1969; (2) be written in English, French, or Spanish; (3) use a study design such as a controlled trial, an observational study, or an experimental study conducted in vivo; (4) be conducted on commercial dairy cows; (5) investigate a non-antibiotic intervention used at dry off; and finally, (6) report on a relevant mastitis outcome. Titles and abstracts, then full articles will be reviewed for inclusion. Specific data will be extracted and risk of bias will be assessed for all included articles. The planned systematic review will be the first to colligate, in a coherent whole, studies investigating non-antibiotic strategies for treating and preventing IMI at drying-off.  
  Address Departement de sciences cliniques,Faculte de medecine veterinaire,Universite de Montreal,C.P. 5000,St-Hyacinthe,QC, J2S 7C6,Canada. Canadian Bovine Mastitis and Milk Quality Research Network,C.P. 5000,St-Hyacinthe,QC, J2S 7C6,Canada. Departement de pathologie et microbiologie, Faculte de medecine veterinaire,Universite de Montreal,C.P. 5000,St-Hyacinthe,QC, J2S 7C6,Canada.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2017/02/06  
  ISSN 1475-2654 (Electronic) 1466-2523 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes CAB Abstracts and Medline searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1450 Serial 2906  
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Author (up) Frank, D.; Beauchamp, G.; Palestrini, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Systematic review of the use of pheromones for treatment of undesirable behavior in cats and dogs Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association Abbreviated Journal J Am Vet Med Assoc  
  Volume 236 Issue 12 Pages 1308-1316  
  Keywords Animal Husbandry; Animals; Behavior, Animal/drug effects; Cats; Dogs; Pheromones/pharmacology  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To systematically review the scientific literature to identify, assess the quality of, and determine outcomes of studies conducted to evaluate the use of pheromones for treatment of undesirable behavior in cats and dogs. DESIGN: Systematic review. STUDY POPULATION: Reports of prospective studies published from January 1998 through December 2008. PROCEDURES: The MEDLINE and CAB Abstracts databases were searched with the following key terms: dog OR dogs OR canine OR cat OR cats OR feline AND pheromone OR synthetic pheromone OR facial pheromone OR appeasing pheromone. A date limit was set from 1998 through 2008. Identified reports for dogs (n = 7) and cats (7) were systematically reviewed. RESULTS: Studies provided insufficient evidence of the effectiveness of feline facial pheromone for management of idiopathic cystitis or calming cats during catheterization and lack of support for reducing stress in hospitalized cats. Only 1 study yielded sufficient evidence that dog-appeasing pheromone reduces fear or anxiety in dogs during training. Six studies yielded insufficient evidence of the effectiveness of dog-appeasing pheromone for treatment of noise phobia (2 reports), travel-related problems, fear or anxiety in the veterinary clinic, and stress- and fear-related behavior in shelter dogs as well as vocalizing and house soiling in recently adopted puppies. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: 11 of the 14 reports reviewed provided insufficient evidence and 1 provided lack of support for effectiveness of pheromones for the treatment of undesirable behavior in cats and dogs.  
  Address Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Veterinaire, Faculte de Medecine Veterinaire, Universite de Montreal, St-Hyacinthe, QC J2S 7C6, Canada.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2010/06/17  
  ISSN 0003-1488 (Print) 0003-1488 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes MEDLINE and CAB Abstracts searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 669 Serial 2422  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Franklin, S.P.; Cook, J.L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title What is the evidence? Surgical treatment of large dogs with hip joint osteoarthritis Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association Abbreviated Journal J Am Vet Med Assoc  
  Volume 238 Issue 4 Pages 440-442  
  Keywords Animals; Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip/veterinary; Dog Diseases/therapy; Dogs; Evidence-Based Medicine/methods/standards; Female; Hip Dysplasia, Canine/surgery; Hip Prosthesis/veterinary; Lameness, Animal; Osteoarthritis/therapy/veterinary  
  Abstract  
  Address Comparative Orthopaedic Laboratory College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211, USA. franklinsa@missouri.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2011/02/16  
  ISSN 0003-1488 (Print) 0003-1488 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 448 Serial 2423  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Fratkin, J.L.; Sinn, D.L.; Patall, E.A.; Gosling, S.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Personality consistency in dogs: a meta-analysis Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication PloS One Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 8 Issue 1 Pages e54907  
  Keywords Animals; Behavior, Animal; Dogs; Personality  
  Abstract Personality, or consistent individual differences in behavior, is well established in studies of dogs. Such consistency implies predictability of behavior, but some recent research suggests that predictability cannot be assumed. In addition, anecdotally, many dog experts believe that 'puppy tests' measuring behavior during the first year of a dog's life are not accurate indicators of subsequent adult behavior. Personality consistency in dogs is an important aspect of human-dog relationships (e.g., when selecting dogs suitable for substance-detection work or placement in a family). Here we perform the first comprehensive meta-analysis of studies reporting estimates of temporal consistency of dog personality. A thorough literature search identified 31 studies suitable for inclusion in our meta-analysis. Overall, we found evidence to suggest substantial consistency (r = 0.43). Furthermore, personality consistency was higher in older dogs, when behavioral assessment intervals were shorter, and when the measurement tool was exactly the same in both assessments. In puppies, aggression and submissiveness were the most consistent dimensions, while responsiveness to training, fearfulness, and sociability were the least consistent dimensions. In adult dogs, there were no dimension-based differences in consistency. There was no difference in personality consistency in dogs tested first as puppies and later as adults (e.g., 'puppy tests') versus dogs tested first as puppies and later again as puppies. Finally, there were no differences in consistency between working versus non-working dogs, between behavioral codings versus behavioral ratings, and between aggregate versus single measures. Implications for theory, practice, and future research are discussed.  
  Address Department of Psychology, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, United States of America. fratkijl@utexas.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2013/02/02  
  ISSN 1932-6203 (Electronic) 1932-6203 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PsychInfo, Biosis, Web of Science, and ProQuest Dissertation and Theses searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1128 Serial 2424  
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Author (up) Freeman, A.C.; Platt, S.R.; Kent, M.; Hofmeister, E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title What is the evidence? Diagnosis of an intracranial lesion as a meningioma on the basis of MRI characteristics Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association Abbreviated Journal J Am Vet Med Assoc  
  Volume 239 Issue 1 Pages 60-62  
  Keywords Animals; Brain Neoplasms/diagnosis/surgery/veterinary; Dog Diseases/diagnosis/radiography/surgery; Dogs; Female; Magnetic Resonance Imaging/veterinary; Meningioma/diagnosis/surgery/veterinary; Seizures/diagnosis/veterinary  
  Abstract  
  Address Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA. acf@uga.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2011/07/02  
  ISSN 1943-569X (Electronic) 0003-1488 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed and Web of Science searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 449 Serial 2425  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Freire, R.; Cowling, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The welfare of laying hens in conventional cages and alternative systems: first steps towards a quantitative comparison Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Animal Welfare Abbreviated Journal Anim Welf  
  Volume 22 Issue 1 Pages 57-65  
  Keywords Animal Welfare [LL810]; Animal Behaviour [LL300]; Egg Producing Animals [LL130]; Techniques and Methodology [ZZ900]; Non-communicable Diseases and Injuries of Animals [LL860]; animal experiments; animal housing; animal welfare; bones; cages; cannibalism; data analysis; effects; egg production; eggs; feather pecking; hens; meta-analysis; mortality; outbreaks; poultry; research; synthesis; techniques; wounds; birds; fowls; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; eukaryotes; Gallus gallus; Gallus; Phasianidae; Galliformes; animal research; animal rights; chickens; death rate; domesticated birds; pecking; studies; [Indexed using CAB Thesaurus terms]  
  Abstract Research synthesis, using techniques such as meta-analysis to combine the results of a number of studies, is a particularly useful technique when there are multiple studies with conflicting results, or where there may be conflicting interests, and can serve to extract the maximum information from animal experiments. The effect of conventional cages and alternative housing systems on measures of production, behaviour, physical and physiological condition in laying hens is an important question that would benefit from research synthesis. We found that statistical constraints did not allow the usual methods of meta-analysis, so as a first step towards quantitative comparison, we used a simple vote-counting approach based on the treatment means. We counted the number of papers in which conventional cages or alternative systems had a higher weighted mean for various response variables. Egg production was higher in conventional cages than in alternative systems, though this effect was probably mostly confined to the comparison with multi-level indoor systems. Bones were stronger from hens kept in alternative systems than those kept in conventional cages. We confirmed previous reviews that birds show more comfort behaviour and possibly dustbathing (or vacuum dustbathing) behaviour in alternative systems, but aggressive pecking did not differ between systems. Perhaps surprisingly, mortality, feather pecking and body wounds were not found to differ between systems. The latter findings suggest that the chance of a mortality or cannibalism outbreak may be no greater in alternative systems than in cage systems, but it should be noted that our analysis did not consider the magnitude of the difference in mortality. In conclusion, the meta-comparison undertaken here supports some but contradicts other conclusions reached in qualitative reviews.  
  Address School of Animal and Veterinary Sciences, Charles Sturt University, Wagga Wagga, NSW 2650, Australia. rfreire@csu.edu.au  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0962-7286 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Web of Knowledge (Web of Science?) searched. Database record copyright CAB International 2010 Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 894 Serial 2426  
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Author (up) Frizzo, L.S.; Zbrun, M.V.; Soto, L.P.; Signorini, M.L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of probiotics on growth performance in young calves: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Animal Feed Science and Technology Abbreviated Journal Anim Feed Sci Tech  
  Volume 169 Issue 3/4 Pages 147-156  
  Keywords Pesticides and Drugs (General) [HH400]; Information and Documentation [CC300]; Animal Nutrition (General) [LL500]; Host Resistance and Immunity [HH600]; Animal Nutrition (Physiology) [LL510]; Nutrition related Disorders and Therapeutic Nutrition [VV130]; Prion, Viral, Bacterial and Fungal Pathogens of Animals [LL821]; Animal Immunology [LL650]; Microbiology (General) [ZZ390]; Milk and Dairy Produce [QQ010]; Other Produce [QQ070]; Forage and Feed Products (Non-human) [RR000]; animal nutrition; antibiotics; body weight; calves; data analysis; databases; diarrhoea; digestive system; feed conversion efficiency; feeds; gastrointestinal diseases; growth promoters; growth rate; immunity; infections; intestines; lactic acid; lactic acid bacteria; meta-analysis; milk; passive immunity; probiotics; promoters; research; weight gain; Bacteria; bacterium; prokaryotes; alimentary tract; data banks; diarrhea; feeding stuffs; gastrointestinal system; growth stimulants; lactate; promoter region; promoter sequences; scouring; studies; cattle; [Indexed using CAB Thesaurus terms]  
  Abstract Growth of calves during their first few weeks of life is one of the most important factors affecting their performance during subsequent rearing, and it can be modified by disease, especially gastrointestinal infections. Use of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) is a tool which may maintain the intestinal microbial balance, prevent diarrhea and improve growth. However, a consensus has not been reached as to whether probiotics are effective in improving growth of calves. The objective of this meta-analysis was to assess effects of probiotics on the growth of calves (i.e., body weight gain (BWG), feed efficiency). PubMed and Scopus databases were searched from 1980 to 2010, unrestricted by language. The inclusion criteria were: randomized and controlled experiments using calves less than 5 d of age without apparent disease and with passive immunity, and published in peer reviewed journals. Twenty-one and 14 studies were included to assess probiotic effects on BWG and feed efficiency, respectively. LAB supplementation increased BWG (standardized mean differences (SMD)=0.22822, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.1006-0.4638) and improve feed efficiency (SMD=-0.8141, 95% CI -1.2222 to -0.4059), considering the source of heterogeneity and publication biases. Growth of calves was not affected when the LAB was added to whole milk, but beneficial effects occurred when LAB was added to milk replacer. The probiotic effect was not related to the number of LAB strains in the inoculum. The number of calves in the experiments had an impact on the results and conclusions. Probiotics may be an alternative to the antibiotics commonly used as growth promoters in calves.  
  Address Department of Public Health, Faculty of Veterinary Science – Litoral National University, Kreder 2805, (S3080HOF) Esperanza, Province of Santa Fe, Argentina. marcelo.signorini@gmail.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0377-8401 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed and Scopus searched. Database record copyright CAB International 2010 Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 324 Serial 2427  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Fromm, S.; Beisswanger, E.; Kasbohrer, A.; Tenhagen, B.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Risk factors for MRSA in fattening pig herds – A meta-analysis using pooled data Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Preventive Veterinary Medicine Abbreviated Journal Prev Vet Med  
  Volume 117 Issue 1 Pages 180-8  
  Keywords Pigs; Swine  
  Abstract The importance of livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA) as an infectious agent for humans has increased in recent years in Germany. Although it is well known that the prevalence of MRSA in pig farms is high, risk factors for the presence of MRSA in herds of fattening pigs are still poorly understood. The aim of this study was to evaluate available data from previous studies on MRSA in fattening pigs in a meta-analysis to answer the question: What are the factors associated with the occurrence of MRSA in fattening pig herds? The studies on MRSA in pigs that were identified by literature research were heterogeneous with respect to the risk factors investigated and the type of herds focused on. Therefore we decided to carry out a pooling analysis on herd level rather than a typical meta-analysis. Eligible herd data were identified based on the published literature and communication with the authors. The final data set covered 400 fattening pig herds from 10 different studies and 12 risk factors. The prevalence of MRSA in the 400 fattening pig herds was 53.5%. Data were analyzed using generalized estimating equations (GEE). The resulting multivariate model confirmed previously identified risk factors for MRSA in pig herds (herd size and herd type). It also identified further risk factors: group treatment of fattening pigs with antimicrobial drugs (OR=1.79) and housing fattening pig herds on at least partially slatted floors (OR=2.39) compared to plain floor. In contrast, according to the model, fattening pig herds on farms keeping other livestock along with pigs were less likely to harbor MRSA (OR=0.54). The results underline the benefits from a pooling analysis and cooperative re-evaluation of published data.  
  Address Federal Institute for Risk Assessment, Department for Biological Safety, Unit Epidemiology and Zoonoses, Diedersdorfer Weg 1, D-12277 Berlin, Germany; University of Potsdam, Faculty of Science, Institute of Nutritional Sciences, Arthur-Scheunert-Allee 114-116, D-14558 Nuthetal, Germany. Federal Institute for Risk Assessment, Department for Biological Safety, Unit Epidemiology and Zoonoses, Diedersdorfer Weg 1, D-12277 Berlin, Germany. Federal Institute for Risk Assessment, Department for Biological Safety, Unit Epidemiology and Zoonoses, Diedersdorfer Weg 1, D-12277 Berlin, Germany. Electronic address: Bernd-Alois.Tenhagen@bfr.bund.de.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2014/09/23  
  ISSN 1873-1716 (Electronic) 0167-5877 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, Web of Science and Scopus searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1259 Serial 2747  
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Author (up) Gadberry, M.S.; Hawley, J.; Beck, P.A.; Jennings, J.A.; Kegley, E.B.; Coffey, K.P. doi  openurl
  Title BILL E. KUNKLE INTERDISCIPLINARY BEEF SYMPOSIUM: A meta-analysis of research efforts aimed at reducing the impact of fescue toxicosis on cattle weight gain and feed intake Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Journal of Animal Science Abbreviated Journal J Anim Sci  
  Volume 93 Issue 12 Pages 5496-5505  
  Keywords Cattle; Bovines; Fescue  
  Abstract The objective of this paper is to present a systematic review and meta-analysis of research efforts aimed at recovering cattle production losses attributed to toxic endophyte-infected [ (Morgan-Jones & Gams.) Glenn, Bacon, & Hanlin comb. Nov.] tall fescue [ (Schreb.) Darbysh.]. The strategies presented include those 1) applied with forage systems, 2) based on pharmacological compounds and functional foods, and 3) based on supplemental dietary nutrients. Cattle BW gain and DM intake was the dependent response evaluated. Among the forage systems reviewed, studies with nontoxic, endophyte-infected tall fescue as a total replacement forage system demonstrated the greatest improvement in per-hectare (152 +/- 27.5 kg/ha) and per-animal (0.29 +/- 0.03 kg/d) BW gain. Studies with interseeded legumes have exhibited a small and highly variable BW gain effect size per hectare (52 +/- 24.1 kg/ha) and per animal (0.11 +/- 0.03 kg/d). The legume response was seasonal, with summer exhibiting the greatest benefit. Studies with chemicals that suppress plant growth demonstrated BW gain responses (0.17 +/- 0.06 kg/d) equal to or greater than the response observed with legume studies. Cattle grazing toxic tall fescue responded well to anthelmentics, antimicrobial feed additives, and steroid implants, and the use of these technologies may additively help recover production losses. As a group, functional foods have not improved BW gain ( = 0.85). Studies with cattle supplemented with highly digestible fiber supplements observed a 0.15 kg greater BW gain compared with studies using starch- and sugar-based supplements ( < 0.05). Weight gain was positively impacted by the level of supplementation (0.06 kg/DM intake as percent BW). Supplement feed conversion was estimated at 6:1 for the highly digestible fiber supplements compared with 11:1 for starch-based supplements. Tall fescue forage DM intake was predicted to maximize at a supplemental feeding rate of 0.24% BW with a breakpoint at 0.5% BW, and total maximum DM intake (forage plus supplement) occurred at 2.7% BW when supplemental feeding approached 0.9% BW. Results from this meta-analysis should be useful for 1) establishing and comparing measured responses to theoretical improvements in BW gain when additive strategies are considered, 2) research planning, and 3) producer education.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2015/12/08  
  ISSN 1525-3163 (Electronic) 0021-8812 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Agricola and Google Scholar searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1393 Serial 2858  
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