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Author (up) Finka, L.R.; Ellis, S.L.; Stavisky, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A critically appraised topic (CAT) to compare the effects of single and multi-cat housing on physiological and behavioural measures of stress in domestic cats in confined environments Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication BMC Veterinary Research Abbreviated Journal BMC Vet Res  
  Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages 73  
  Keywords Animals; Cat Diseases/etiology; Cat Diseases/prevention & control; Cats/physiology; Cats/psychology; Housing, Animal/standards; Stress, Psychological/etiology; Stress, Psychological/prevention & control; Cats  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Domestic cats have evolved from solitary, asocial predators and whilst they may display social behaviours, they can still exist as solitary survivors. Over-population and relinquishment of pet cats are ubiquitous problems worldwide, and rehoming centres (also known as rescues/ shelters) aim to ameliorate this by holding cats in confinement for a variable period until a new home is found. The provision of optimal housing for large numbers of cats in close confinement, such as in rehoming centres, is therefore inherently difficult. Under these conditions there is the potential for individuals to develop signs of physical and psychological ill health, and thus experience compromised welfare. Available information regarding housing practices that maximise welfare currently provides conflicting results, and as a consequence there are no unanimous housing recommendations. The aim of this study was therefore to review the evidence on the impact of single housing compared to multi-cat housing on stress in confined cats, as measured by physiological and/or behavioural outcomes. The review was conducted using a Critically Appraised Topic (CAT) format. A systematic search of electronic databases (CAB Abstracts, Zoological Records and Medline) was carried out to identify peer-reviewed literature comparing single and multi-cat housing in confined environments. RESULTS: A total of 959 papers were initially identified, six of which met sufficient criteria based on their relevance to be included within this review. All of the studies had significant limitations in design and methodology, including a lack of information on how groups were assigned, inconsistent handling and enrichment provision between groups, and lack of information on the socialisation status of cats. CONCLUSIONS: Whilst some studies suggested that single housing may be less stressful for cats, others suggested group housing was less stressful. Several other important factors were however identified as potential mediators of stress within the different housing systems, and recommendations based upon these findings are presented.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2014/03/25  
  ISSN 1746-6148 (Electronic) 1746-6148 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes CAB Abstracts, Zoological Record and MEDLINE searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1210 Serial 2701  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Flatland, B.; Koenigshof, A.M.; Rozanski, E.A.; Goggs, R.; Wiinberg, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Systematic evaluation of evidence on veterinary viscoelastic testing Part 2: Sample acquisition and handling Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Journal of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care (San Antonio, Tex. : 2001) Abbreviated Journal J Vet Emerg Crit Care (San Antonio)  
  Volume 24 Issue 1 Pages 30-36  
  Keywords Animals; Blood Specimen Collection/methods; Blood Specimen Collection/standards; Blood Specimen Collection/veterinary; Cats/blood; Dogs/blood; Horses/blood; Reference Standards; Thrombelastography/instrumentation; Thrombelastography/methods; Thrombelastography/veterinary; Veterinary Medicine/standards; Animals; Dogs; Cats; Horses  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To examine systematically the evidence on sample acquisition and handling for the thrombo elastography (TEG) and rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM) viscoelastic point of care instruments and to identify knowledge gaps. DESIGN: Six questions were considered, addressing sampling site, collection system, anticoagulant, collection procedure, and sample storage. Standardized, systematic evaluation of the literature was performed. Relevant articles were categorized according to level of evidence (LOE). Consensus was developed regarding conclusions for application of concepts to clinical practice. SETTING: Academic and referral veterinary medical centers. RESULTS: PubMed and CAB abstracts were searched. Eighteen papers were initially chosen; 5 of these papers applied to > 1 domain question. Three papers were used to address 2 questions each, and 2 papers were used to address 3 questions each. Most papers were judged LOE 3 (Good or Fair). Two of 5 papers were judged to be the same LOE each time they were used; 2 papers were judged to be LOE 3, Fair for 1 question and 3, Good for a second question; 1 paper used to address 3 questions was judged LOE 3, Good twice and 3, Fair once. Fourteen additional papers were evaluated post hoc during manuscript preparation. CONCLUSIONS: Jugular venipuncture is recommended, but samples from IV catheters can be used. Consistent technique is important for serial sampling, and standardized sampling protocols are recommended for individual centers performing TEG/ROTEM. There is insufficient evidence to recommend use of a specific blood collection system, although use of evacuated blood tubes and 21-Ga or larger needles is suggested. Use of 3.2% buffered sodium citrate in a strict 1:9 ratio of citrate to blood is suggested. Suggested tube draw order is discard/serum, followed by citrate, EDTA, and then heparin. Samples should be held at room temperature for 30 minutes prior to analysis.  
  Address From the Department of Biomedical and Diagnostic Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2014/01/30  
  ISSN 1476-4431 (Electronic) 1476-4431 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed and CAB Abstracts searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1188 Serial 2682  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Fourichon, C.; Seegers, H.; Malher, X. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effect of disease on reproduction in the dairy cow: a meta-analysis Type Journal Article
  Year 2000 Publication Theriogenology Abbreviated Journal Theriogenology  
  Volume 53 Issue 9 Pages 1729-1759  
  Keywords Abomasum/physiopathology; Abortion, Veterinary/physiopathology; Anestrus/physiology; Animals; Cattle; Cattle Diseases/physiopathology; Dystocia/physiopathology/veterinary; Female; Fetal Death/physiopathology/veterinary; Ketosis/physiopathology/veterinary; Male; Mastitis, Bovine/physiopathology; Movement Disorders/physiopathology/veterinary; Ovarian Cysts/physiopathology/veterinary; Parturient Paresis/physiopathology; Placenta, Retained/physiopathology/veterinary; Pregnancy; Reproduction  
  Abstract Effects on reproduction of dystocia, stillbirth, abortion, milk fever, retained placenta, metritis, cystic ovaries, anestrus, ketosis, displaced abomasum, locomotor disorders, and mastitis were reviewed. Papers were considered if they provided quantitative estimates of diseases on days to first estrus, days to first service, conception rate at first service, days from first service to conception, days to conception or days open, calving interval, conception rates at various days post partum (dpp), and number of services per conception or per cow. Only papers in English in peer-reviewed journals were selected for analysis of post 1960 data from intensive dairy regions. Seventy papers fulfilled the selection criteria. Summary estimates of disease effects were calculated according to meta-analysis methods, and study designs were described in detail to identify possible heterogeneity of the results. Stillbirth, milk fever, displaced abomasum and mastitis had no effect on reproduction. Clinical ketosis, dystocia and retained placenta were associated with 2 to 3 more days to first service and with a 4 to 10% lower conception rate at first service, resulting in 6 to 12 more days to conception. Locomotor disorders were associated with an average increase of 12 d to conception, with wide variation depending on lesions and stage of occurrence. Metritis was associated with 7 more days to first service, 20% lower conception rate at first service, resulting in 19 more days to conception. Cystic ovaries were associated with 6 to 11 more days to first service and with 20 to 30 more days to conception. Anestrus was associated with 26 more days to first service and with an 18% lower conception rate at first service, resulting in 41 more days to conception. Abortion was associated with 70 to 80 more days to conception.  
  Address Unit of Animal Health Management, Veterinary School-INRA, Nantes, France. fourichon@vet-nantes.fr  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2000/09/01  
  ISSN 0093-691X (Print) 0093-691X (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes CAB Abstracts searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 667 Serial 2420  
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Author (up) Francoz, D.; Buczinski, S.; Apley, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evidence related to the use of ancillary drugs in bovine respiratory disease (anti-inflammatory and others): are they justified or not? Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Veterinary Clinics of North America. Food Animal Practice Abbreviated Journal Vet Clin North Am Food Anim Pract  
  Volume 28 Issue 1 Pages 23-38, vii-viii  
  Keywords Animals; Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use; Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/therapeutic use; Bovine Respiratory Disease Complex/drug therapy; Cattle; Cattle Diseases/drug therapy; Evidence-Based Medicine; Immunomodulation; Treatment Outcome  
  Abstract The therapeutic approach for bovine respiratory disease (BRD) includes antimicrobial treatment due to the frequent implication of bacteria. The data concerning the use of ancillary drugs (such as anti-inflammatory drugs or immunomodulators) are scant and often are based on experimental models of BRD. The effect of NSAIDs on pulmonary lesions, despite appearing beneficial, remains to be confirmed in well-designed, long-term trials. The impact on weight gain is inconsistent in these studies. This review emphasized the need for articles concerning clinical trials to clearly state study inclusion criteria, and definitions of clinical scores, relapses, and treatment failures to be properly evaluated.  
  Address Departement des Sciences Cliniques, Faculte de Medecine Veterinaire, St-Hyacinthe, Universite de Montreal, CP 5000, J2S 7C6 Quebec, Canada. david.francoz@umontreal.ca  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2012/03/01  
  ISSN 1558-4240 (Electronic) 0749-0720 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes MEDLINE and CAB Abstracts searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 543 Serial 2421  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Francoz, D.; Wellemans, V.; Roy, J.P.; Lacasse, P.; Ordonez-Iturriaga, A.; Labelle, F.; Dufour, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Non-antibiotic approaches at drying-off for treating and preventing intramammary infections: a protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Animal Health Research Reviews Abbreviated Journal Anim Health Res Rev  
  Volume 17 Issue 2 Pages 169-175  
  Keywords Cattle; Cows; Bovine; Dairy cows; Mastitis; Drying off; Antimicrobials  
  Abstract Intramammary infection (IMI) treatment and prevention at drying-off is one of the leading causes for using antimicrobials on dairy farms. The objective of the current paper is to describe the protocol used for conducting a systematic review of the literature on non-antibiotic strategies that can be used on dairy cows at dry off to treat and prevent IMI. Relevant literature will be identified using a combination of database search strategies and iterative screening of references. To be included in the review, articles will have to: (1) be published after 1969; (2) be written in English, French, or Spanish; (3) use a study design such as a controlled trial, an observational study, or an experimental study conducted in vivo; (4) be conducted on commercial dairy cows; (5) investigate a non-antibiotic intervention used at dry off; and finally, (6) report on a relevant mastitis outcome. Titles and abstracts, then full articles will be reviewed for inclusion. Specific data will be extracted and risk of bias will be assessed for all included articles. The planned systematic review will be the first to colligate, in a coherent whole, studies investigating non-antibiotic strategies for treating and preventing IMI at drying-off.  
  Address Departement de sciences cliniques,Faculte de medecine veterinaire,Universite de Montreal,C.P. 5000,St-Hyacinthe,QC, J2S 7C6,Canada. Canadian Bovine Mastitis and Milk Quality Research Network,C.P. 5000,St-Hyacinthe,QC, J2S 7C6,Canada. Departement de pathologie et microbiologie, Faculte de medecine veterinaire,Universite de Montreal,C.P. 5000,St-Hyacinthe,QC, J2S 7C6,Canada.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2017/02/06  
  ISSN 1475-2654 (Electronic) 1466-2523 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes CAB Abstracts and Medline searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1450 Serial 2906  
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Author (up) Frank, D.; Beauchamp, G.; Palestrini, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Systematic review of the use of pheromones for treatment of undesirable behavior in cats and dogs Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association Abbreviated Journal J Am Vet Med Assoc  
  Volume 236 Issue 12 Pages 1308-1316  
  Keywords Animal Husbandry; Animals; Behavior, Animal/drug effects; Cats; Dogs; Pheromones/pharmacology  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To systematically review the scientific literature to identify, assess the quality of, and determine outcomes of studies conducted to evaluate the use of pheromones for treatment of undesirable behavior in cats and dogs. DESIGN: Systematic review. STUDY POPULATION: Reports of prospective studies published from January 1998 through December 2008. PROCEDURES: The MEDLINE and CAB Abstracts databases were searched with the following key terms: dog OR dogs OR canine OR cat OR cats OR feline AND pheromone OR synthetic pheromone OR facial pheromone OR appeasing pheromone. A date limit was set from 1998 through 2008. Identified reports for dogs (n = 7) and cats (7) were systematically reviewed. RESULTS: Studies provided insufficient evidence of the effectiveness of feline facial pheromone for management of idiopathic cystitis or calming cats during catheterization and lack of support for reducing stress in hospitalized cats. Only 1 study yielded sufficient evidence that dog-appeasing pheromone reduces fear or anxiety in dogs during training. Six studies yielded insufficient evidence of the effectiveness of dog-appeasing pheromone for treatment of noise phobia (2 reports), travel-related problems, fear or anxiety in the veterinary clinic, and stress- and fear-related behavior in shelter dogs as well as vocalizing and house soiling in recently adopted puppies. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: 11 of the 14 reports reviewed provided insufficient evidence and 1 provided lack of support for effectiveness of pheromones for the treatment of undesirable behavior in cats and dogs.  
  Address Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Veterinaire, Faculte de Medecine Veterinaire, Universite de Montreal, St-Hyacinthe, QC J2S 7C6, Canada.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2010/06/17  
  ISSN 0003-1488 (Print) 0003-1488 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes MEDLINE and CAB Abstracts searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 669 Serial 2422  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Franklin, S.P.; Cook, J.L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title What is the evidence? Surgical treatment of large dogs with hip joint osteoarthritis Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association Abbreviated Journal J Am Vet Med Assoc  
  Volume 238 Issue 4 Pages 440-442  
  Keywords Animals; Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip/veterinary; Dog Diseases/therapy; Dogs; Evidence-Based Medicine/methods/standards; Female; Hip Dysplasia, Canine/surgery; Hip Prosthesis/veterinary; Lameness, Animal; Osteoarthritis/therapy/veterinary  
  Abstract  
  Address Comparative Orthopaedic Laboratory College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211, USA. franklinsa@missouri.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2011/02/16  
  ISSN 0003-1488 (Print) 0003-1488 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 448 Serial 2423  
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Author (up) Fratkin, J.L.; Sinn, D.L.; Patall, E.A.; Gosling, S.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Personality consistency in dogs: a meta-analysis Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication PloS One Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 8 Issue 1 Pages e54907  
  Keywords Animals; Behavior, Animal; Dogs; Personality  
  Abstract Personality, or consistent individual differences in behavior, is well established in studies of dogs. Such consistency implies predictability of behavior, but some recent research suggests that predictability cannot be assumed. In addition, anecdotally, many dog experts believe that 'puppy tests' measuring behavior during the first year of a dog's life are not accurate indicators of subsequent adult behavior. Personality consistency in dogs is an important aspect of human-dog relationships (e.g., when selecting dogs suitable for substance-detection work or placement in a family). Here we perform the first comprehensive meta-analysis of studies reporting estimates of temporal consistency of dog personality. A thorough literature search identified 31 studies suitable for inclusion in our meta-analysis. Overall, we found evidence to suggest substantial consistency (r = 0.43). Furthermore, personality consistency was higher in older dogs, when behavioral assessment intervals were shorter, and when the measurement tool was exactly the same in both assessments. In puppies, aggression and submissiveness were the most consistent dimensions, while responsiveness to training, fearfulness, and sociability were the least consistent dimensions. In adult dogs, there were no dimension-based differences in consistency. There was no difference in personality consistency in dogs tested first as puppies and later as adults (e.g., 'puppy tests') versus dogs tested first as puppies and later again as puppies. Finally, there were no differences in consistency between working versus non-working dogs, between behavioral codings versus behavioral ratings, and between aggregate versus single measures. Implications for theory, practice, and future research are discussed.  
  Address Department of Psychology, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, United States of America. fratkijl@utexas.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2013/02/02  
  ISSN 1932-6203 (Electronic) 1932-6203 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PsychInfo, Biosis, Web of Science, and ProQuest Dissertation and Theses searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1128 Serial 2424  
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Author (up) Freeman, A.C.; Platt, S.R.; Kent, M.; Hofmeister, E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title What is the evidence? Diagnosis of an intracranial lesion as a meningioma on the basis of MRI characteristics Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association Abbreviated Journal J Am Vet Med Assoc  
  Volume 239 Issue 1 Pages 60-62  
  Keywords Animals; Brain Neoplasms/diagnosis/surgery/veterinary; Dog Diseases/diagnosis/radiography/surgery; Dogs; Female; Magnetic Resonance Imaging/veterinary; Meningioma/diagnosis/surgery/veterinary; Seizures/diagnosis/veterinary  
  Abstract  
  Address Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA. acf@uga.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2011/07/02  
  ISSN 1943-569X (Electronic) 0003-1488 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed and Web of Science searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 449 Serial 2425  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Freire, R.; Cowling, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The welfare of laying hens in conventional cages and alternative systems: first steps towards a quantitative comparison Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Animal Welfare Abbreviated Journal Anim Welf  
  Volume 22 Issue 1 Pages 57-65  
  Keywords Animal Welfare [LL810]; Animal Behaviour [LL300]; Egg Producing Animals [LL130]; Techniques and Methodology [ZZ900]; Non-communicable Diseases and Injuries of Animals [LL860]; animal experiments; animal housing; animal welfare; bones; cages; cannibalism; data analysis; effects; egg production; eggs; feather pecking; hens; meta-analysis; mortality; outbreaks; poultry; research; synthesis; techniques; wounds; birds; fowls; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; eukaryotes; Gallus gallus; Gallus; Phasianidae; Galliformes; animal research; animal rights; chickens; death rate; domesticated birds; pecking; studies; [Indexed using CAB Thesaurus terms]  
  Abstract Research synthesis, using techniques such as meta-analysis to combine the results of a number of studies, is a particularly useful technique when there are multiple studies with conflicting results, or where there may be conflicting interests, and can serve to extract the maximum information from animal experiments. The effect of conventional cages and alternative housing systems on measures of production, behaviour, physical and physiological condition in laying hens is an important question that would benefit from research synthesis. We found that statistical constraints did not allow the usual methods of meta-analysis, so as a first step towards quantitative comparison, we used a simple vote-counting approach based on the treatment means. We counted the number of papers in which conventional cages or alternative systems had a higher weighted mean for various response variables. Egg production was higher in conventional cages than in alternative systems, though this effect was probably mostly confined to the comparison with multi-level indoor systems. Bones were stronger from hens kept in alternative systems than those kept in conventional cages. We confirmed previous reviews that birds show more comfort behaviour and possibly dustbathing (or vacuum dustbathing) behaviour in alternative systems, but aggressive pecking did not differ between systems. Perhaps surprisingly, mortality, feather pecking and body wounds were not found to differ between systems. The latter findings suggest that the chance of a mortality or cannibalism outbreak may be no greater in alternative systems than in cage systems, but it should be noted that our analysis did not consider the magnitude of the difference in mortality. In conclusion, the meta-comparison undertaken here supports some but contradicts other conclusions reached in qualitative reviews.  
  Address School of Animal and Veterinary Sciences, Charles Sturt University, Wagga Wagga, NSW 2650, Australia. rfreire@csu.edu.au  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0962-7286 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Web of Knowledge (Web of Science?) searched. Database record copyright CAB International 2010 Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 894 Serial 2426  
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Author (up) Frizzo, L.S.; Zbrun, M.V.; Soto, L.P.; Signorini, M.L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of probiotics on growth performance in young calves: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Animal Feed Science and Technology Abbreviated Journal Anim Feed Sci Tech  
  Volume 169 Issue 3/4 Pages 147-156  
  Keywords Pesticides and Drugs (General) [HH400]; Information and Documentation [CC300]; Animal Nutrition (General) [LL500]; Host Resistance and Immunity [HH600]; Animal Nutrition (Physiology) [LL510]; Nutrition related Disorders and Therapeutic Nutrition [VV130]; Prion, Viral, Bacterial and Fungal Pathogens of Animals [LL821]; Animal Immunology [LL650]; Microbiology (General) [ZZ390]; Milk and Dairy Produce [QQ010]; Other Produce [QQ070]; Forage and Feed Products (Non-human) [RR000]; animal nutrition; antibiotics; body weight; calves; data analysis; databases; diarrhoea; digestive system; feed conversion efficiency; feeds; gastrointestinal diseases; growth promoters; growth rate; immunity; infections; intestines; lactic acid; lactic acid bacteria; meta-analysis; milk; passive immunity; probiotics; promoters; research; weight gain; Bacteria; bacterium; prokaryotes; alimentary tract; data banks; diarrhea; feeding stuffs; gastrointestinal system; growth stimulants; lactate; promoter region; promoter sequences; scouring; studies; cattle; [Indexed using CAB Thesaurus terms]  
  Abstract Growth of calves during their first few weeks of life is one of the most important factors affecting their performance during subsequent rearing, and it can be modified by disease, especially gastrointestinal infections. Use of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) is a tool which may maintain the intestinal microbial balance, prevent diarrhea and improve growth. However, a consensus has not been reached as to whether probiotics are effective in improving growth of calves. The objective of this meta-analysis was to assess effects of probiotics on the growth of calves (i.e., body weight gain (BWG), feed efficiency). PubMed and Scopus databases were searched from 1980 to 2010, unrestricted by language. The inclusion criteria were: randomized and controlled experiments using calves less than 5 d of age without apparent disease and with passive immunity, and published in peer reviewed journals. Twenty-one and 14 studies were included to assess probiotic effects on BWG and feed efficiency, respectively. LAB supplementation increased BWG (standardized mean differences (SMD)=0.22822, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.1006-0.4638) and improve feed efficiency (SMD=-0.8141, 95% CI -1.2222 to -0.4059), considering the source of heterogeneity and publication biases. Growth of calves was not affected when the LAB was added to whole milk, but beneficial effects occurred when LAB was added to milk replacer. The probiotic effect was not related to the number of LAB strains in the inoculum. The number of calves in the experiments had an impact on the results and conclusions. Probiotics may be an alternative to the antibiotics commonly used as growth promoters in calves.  
  Address Department of Public Health, Faculty of Veterinary Science – Litoral National University, Kreder 2805, (S3080HOF) Esperanza, Province of Santa Fe, Argentina. marcelo.signorini@gmail.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0377-8401 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed and Scopus searched. Database record copyright CAB International 2010 Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 324 Serial 2427  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Fromm, S.; Beisswanger, E.; Kasbohrer, A.; Tenhagen, B.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Risk factors for MRSA in fattening pig herds – A meta-analysis using pooled data Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Preventive Veterinary Medicine Abbreviated Journal Prev Vet Med  
  Volume 117 Issue 1 Pages 180-8  
  Keywords Pigs; Swine  
  Abstract The importance of livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA) as an infectious agent for humans has increased in recent years in Germany. Although it is well known that the prevalence of MRSA in pig farms is high, risk factors for the presence of MRSA in herds of fattening pigs are still poorly understood. The aim of this study was to evaluate available data from previous studies on MRSA in fattening pigs in a meta-analysis to answer the question: What are the factors associated with the occurrence of MRSA in fattening pig herds? The studies on MRSA in pigs that were identified by literature research were heterogeneous with respect to the risk factors investigated and the type of herds focused on. Therefore we decided to carry out a pooling analysis on herd level rather than a typical meta-analysis. Eligible herd data were identified based on the published literature and communication with the authors. The final data set covered 400 fattening pig herds from 10 different studies and 12 risk factors. The prevalence of MRSA in the 400 fattening pig herds was 53.5%. Data were analyzed using generalized estimating equations (GEE). The resulting multivariate model confirmed previously identified risk factors for MRSA in pig herds (herd size and herd type). It also identified further risk factors: group treatment of fattening pigs with antimicrobial drugs (OR=1.79) and housing fattening pig herds on at least partially slatted floors (OR=2.39) compared to plain floor. In contrast, according to the model, fattening pig herds on farms keeping other livestock along with pigs were less likely to harbor MRSA (OR=0.54). The results underline the benefits from a pooling analysis and cooperative re-evaluation of published data.  
  Address Federal Institute for Risk Assessment, Department for Biological Safety, Unit Epidemiology and Zoonoses, Diedersdorfer Weg 1, D-12277 Berlin, Germany; University of Potsdam, Faculty of Science, Institute of Nutritional Sciences, Arthur-Scheunert-Allee 114-116, D-14558 Nuthetal, Germany. Federal Institute for Risk Assessment, Department for Biological Safety, Unit Epidemiology and Zoonoses, Diedersdorfer Weg 1, D-12277 Berlin, Germany. Federal Institute for Risk Assessment, Department for Biological Safety, Unit Epidemiology and Zoonoses, Diedersdorfer Weg 1, D-12277 Berlin, Germany. Electronic address: Bernd-Alois.Tenhagen@bfr.bund.de.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2014/09/23  
  ISSN 1873-1716 (Electronic) 0167-5877 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, Web of Science and Scopus searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1259 Serial 2747  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Gadberry, M.S.; Hawley, J.; Beck, P.A.; Jennings, J.A.; Kegley, E.B.; Coffey, K.P. doi  openurl
  Title BILL E. KUNKLE INTERDISCIPLINARY BEEF SYMPOSIUM: A meta-analysis of research efforts aimed at reducing the impact of fescue toxicosis on cattle weight gain and feed intake Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Journal of Animal Science Abbreviated Journal J Anim Sci  
  Volume 93 Issue 12 Pages 5496-5505  
  Keywords Cattle; Bovines; Fescue  
  Abstract The objective of this paper is to present a systematic review and meta-analysis of research efforts aimed at recovering cattle production losses attributed to toxic endophyte-infected [ (Morgan-Jones & Gams.) Glenn, Bacon, & Hanlin comb. Nov.] tall fescue [ (Schreb.) Darbysh.]. The strategies presented include those 1) applied with forage systems, 2) based on pharmacological compounds and functional foods, and 3) based on supplemental dietary nutrients. Cattle BW gain and DM intake was the dependent response evaluated. Among the forage systems reviewed, studies with nontoxic, endophyte-infected tall fescue as a total replacement forage system demonstrated the greatest improvement in per-hectare (152 +/- 27.5 kg/ha) and per-animal (0.29 +/- 0.03 kg/d) BW gain. Studies with interseeded legumes have exhibited a small and highly variable BW gain effect size per hectare (52 +/- 24.1 kg/ha) and per animal (0.11 +/- 0.03 kg/d). The legume response was seasonal, with summer exhibiting the greatest benefit. Studies with chemicals that suppress plant growth demonstrated BW gain responses (0.17 +/- 0.06 kg/d) equal to or greater than the response observed with legume studies. Cattle grazing toxic tall fescue responded well to anthelmentics, antimicrobial feed additives, and steroid implants, and the use of these technologies may additively help recover production losses. As a group, functional foods have not improved BW gain ( = 0.85). Studies with cattle supplemented with highly digestible fiber supplements observed a 0.15 kg greater BW gain compared with studies using starch- and sugar-based supplements ( < 0.05). Weight gain was positively impacted by the level of supplementation (0.06 kg/DM intake as percent BW). Supplement feed conversion was estimated at 6:1 for the highly digestible fiber supplements compared with 11:1 for starch-based supplements. Tall fescue forage DM intake was predicted to maximize at a supplemental feeding rate of 0.24% BW with a breakpoint at 0.5% BW, and total maximum DM intake (forage plus supplement) occurred at 2.7% BW when supplemental feeding approached 0.9% BW. Results from this meta-analysis should be useful for 1) establishing and comparing measured responses to theoretical improvements in BW gain when additive strategies are considered, 2) research planning, and 3) producer education.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2015/12/08  
  ISSN 1525-3163 (Electronic) 0021-8812 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Agricola and Google Scholar searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1393 Serial 2858  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Garcia-Morante, B.; Segales, J.; Serrano, E.; Sibila, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Determinants for swine mycoplasmal pneumonia reproduction under experimental conditions: A systematic review and recursive partitioning analysis Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication PLoS One Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 12 Issue 7 Pages e0181194  
  Keywords Swine; Pigs; Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae; Pneumonia  
  Abstract One of the main Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (M. hyopneumoniae) swine experimental model objectives is to reproduce mycoplasmal pneumonia (MP). Unfortunately, experimental validated protocols to maximize the chance to successfully achieve lung lesions induced by M. hyopneumoniae are not available at the moment. Thus, the objective of this work was to identify those factors that might have a major influence on the effective development of MP, measured as macroscopic lung lesions, under experimental conditions. Data from 85 studies describing M. hyopneumoniae inoculation experiments were compiled by means of a systematic review and analyzed thereafter. Several variables were considered in the analyses such as the number of pigs in the experiment, serological status against M. hyopneumoniae, source of the animals, age at inoculation, type of inoculum, strain of M. hyopneumoniae, route, dose and times of inoculation, study duration and co-infection with other swine pathogens. Descriptive statistics were used to depict M. hyopneumoniae experimental model main characteristics whereas a recursive partitioning approach, using regression trees, assessed the importance of the abovementioned experimental variables as MP triggering factors. A strong link between the time period between challenge and necropsies and lung lesion severity was observed. Results indicated that the most important factors to explain the observed lung lesion score variability were: (1) study duration, (2) M. hyopneumoniae strain, (3) age at inoculation, (4) co-infection with other swine pathogens and (5) animal source. All other studied variables were not relevant to explain the variability on M. hyopneumoniae lung lesions. The results provided in the present work may serve as a basis for debate in the search for a universally accepted M. hyopneumoniae challenge model.  
  Address IRTA, Centre de Recerca en Sanitat Animal (CReSA, IRTA-UAB), Campus de la Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra, Spain. UAB, Centre de Recerca en Sanitat Animal (CReSA, IRTA-UAB), Campus de la Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra, Spain. Departament de Sanitat i Anatomia Animals, Facultat de Veterinaria, Campus de la Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra, Spain. Servei d'Ecopatologia de Fauna Salvatge, Departament de Medicina i Cirurgia Animals, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra, Spain. Departamento de Biologia and Centro de Estudos do Ambiente e do Mar, Universidade de Aveiro, Aveiro, Portugal.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2017/07/26  
  ISSN 1932-6203 (Electronic) 1932-6203 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Medline searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1458 Serial 2914  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Gartner, M.C.; Weiss, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Personality in felids: a review Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Applied Animal Behaviour Science Abbreviated Journal Appl Anim Behav Sci  
  Volume 144 Issue 1 Pages 1-13  
  Keywords Pets and Companion Animals [LL070]; Biological Resources (General) [PP700]; Techniques and Methodology [ZZ900]; Animal Behaviour [LL300]; animal behaviour; conservation; data analysis; guidelines; health; meta-analysis; methodology; objectives; personality; pets; research; reviews; techniques; temperament; terminology; cats; Felidae; Felis; Fissipeda; carnivores; mammals; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; eukaryotes; animal behavior; behavior; goals; methods; pet animals; recommendations; studies; targets; [Indexed using CAB Thesaurus terms]  
  Abstract Although there has been an increase in felid personality research, much more work is needed, with only 20 published studies, 17 of which focused on the domestic cat. Most studies show important implications for this type of research, but there is no consensus on terminology, method, or conclusions for felids, even at the species level. Felid personality research comes from various fields, and is often carried out with different methods, with diverse goals. This review evaluates the published research on felid personality, and addresses its reliability and validity. Only 60% of the studies reported reliability estimates, and these varied greatly across personality dimensions. The sample weighted mean correlation of the reliability estimates was 0.68 (based on three studies). Fifty-five percent of the studies assessed validity. The personality dimensions with the highest validity for all species were Sociable, Dominant, and Curious, with a mean correlation of 0.82. Recommendations for future research and implications for aiding in conservation and captive animal management efforts and improving health and well-being and welfare are discussed.  
  Address Department of Psychology, School of Philosophy, Psychology and Language Sciences, The University of Edinburgh, 7 George Square, Edinburgh EH8 9JZ, UK. m.c.gartner@sms.ed.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0168-1591 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PsychInfo, CAB Abstracts, Web of Science, BIOSIS and MEDLINE. Database record copyright CAB International 2010 Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1100 Serial 2428  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Gebremedhin, E.Z.; Tadesse, G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A meta-analysis of the prevalence of Toxoplasma gondii in animals and humans in Ethiopia Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Parasites & Vectors Abbreviated Journal Parasit Vectors  
  Volume 8 Issue Pages 291  
  Keywords Cats; Sheep; Goats  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Toxoplasmosis is a worldwide zoonosis. The objectives of this study were to estimate the prevalence and assess the potential risk factors of Toxoplasma gondii infections in animals and humans in Ethiopia by using meta-analytical methods. METHODS: Published studies on T. gondii in animals and humans in Ethiopia were searched in Medline, Google Scholar and the lists of references of articles. Eligible studies were selected by using inclusion and exclusion criteria. The risks of within and across study biases, and the variations in prevalence estimates attributable to heterogeneities were assessed. Pooled prevalence was estimated by the DerSimonian and Laird random effects model. RESULTS: Thirty two studies were eligible and data from 5689 animals and 5718 humans were used for quantitative syntheses. The pooled IgG seroprevalence in cats, small ruminants and humans were estimated at 87.72% (95% CI = 78.63, 93.28), 34.59% (95% CI = 21.08, 51.12) and 74.73% (95% CI = 61.85, 84.36), respectively. The odds of infections were higher in pregnant than in non pregnant women (OR = 3.96), in individuals that had contact with cats than those with no contact (OR = 2.53), and in urban than in rural inhabitants (OR = 2.06). CONCLUSIONS: Toxoplasmosis is highly prevalent and could be a cause of considerable reproductive wastage in small ruminants and multiple diseases in humans in Ethiopia. Public education on preventive measures could help reduce the transmission of the parasite to humans.  
  Address Faculty of Agriculture and Veterinary Science, Ambo University, P.O. Box 19, Ambo, Ethiopia. endrias.zewdu@gmail.com. College of Veterinary Medicine and Agriculture, Addis Ababa University, P.O. Box 34, Debre Zeit, Ethiopia. getadesse1@yahoo.com.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2015/05/29  
  ISSN 1756-3305 (Electronic) 1756-3305 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Medline and Google Scholar searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1351 Serial 2823  
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Author (up) Geburek, F.; Stadler, P. url  openurl
  Title [Regenerative therapy for tendon and ligament disorders in horses: results of treatment with stemcells, blood products, scaffolds and growth factors – review of the literature and meta analysis] Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Pferdeheilkunde Abbreviated Journal Pferdeheilkunde  
  Volume 27 Issue 6 Pages 609  
  Keywords Non-communicable Diseases and Injuries of Animals [LL860]; Animal Surgery and Non-drug Therapy [LL884]; Diagnostic, Therapeutic and Pharmacological Biotechnology [WW700]; adipose tissue; blood; blood plasma; bone marrow; bone marrow cells; embryonic stem cells; growth factors; ligaments; musculoskeletal anomalies; platelets; regeneration; relapse; stem cells; tendons; therapy; tissue repair; horses; Germany; Developed Countries; European Union Countries; OECD Countries; Western Europe; Europe; Equus; Equidae; Perissodactyla; ungulates; mammals; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; eukaryotes; blood platelets; plasma (blood); recurrence of disease; relapses; skeletomuscular anomalies; therapeutics; thrombocytes; [Indexed using CAB Thesaurus terms]  
  Abstract Conventional treatments for tendon and ligament disorders give rise to functionally inferior repair tissue within a relatively long healing phase which results in a relatively high recurrence rate. There is however increasing evidence that intralesional treatments with cells, blood products, scaffolds and biological factors such as growth factors have a regenerative effect. In the present review the principal scientific findings on the clinical effects in living horses of, for example, bone-marrow-derived and adipose-tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and blood products such as PRP (platelet rich plasma), ACP (autologous conditioned plasma) and ACS (autologous conditioned serum) are summarized and discussed. Relating to horses, several scientific investigations with different study designs can be found in the literature: (1) Clinical case series, which allow a limited comparison of different treatment methods on the basis of the resulting recurrence rate. (2) Experimental animal studies on controlled artificial tendon defects, which often provide detailed results on the histological, biochemical and biomechanical quality of repair tissue. (3) Single placebo-controlled studies of naturally occurring tendinopathies which should, at least theoretically, provide the highest degree of evidence, however show methodological weaknesses in many cases. Among other aspects, the advantages and disadvantages of the various substrates, their biological safety, their effect with regard to the structural and biomechanical properties of different tendons and ligaments and their effect on the recurrence rate of tendon and ligament disorders are described and discussed. There is increasing evidence that substrates with regenerative potential are superior to other, i.e. conventional, treatments although it is still not clear which product or combination of substrates is most appropriate in individual cases.  
  Address Fachtierarzt fur Pferde, Stiftung Tierarztliche Hochschule Hannover, Klinik fur Pferde, Bunteweg 9, 30559 Hannover, Germany. florian.geburek@tiho-hannover.de  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language German Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0177-7726 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, Web of Science and Google searched. Database record copyright CAB International 2010 Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1102 Serial 2429  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Geburek, F.; Stadler, P. url  openurl
  Title [Regenerative therapy for tendon and ligament disorders in horses. Terminology, production, biologic potential and in vitro effects] Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Tierarztliche Praxis. Ausgabe G, Grosstiere/Nutztiere Abbreviated Journal Tierarztl Prax Ausg G Grosstiere Nutztiere  
  Volume 39 Issue 6 Pages 373-383  
  Keywords Animals; Blood Transfusion, Autologous/veterinary; Bone Marrow Cells/physiology; Genetic Therapy/veterinary; Guided Tissue Regeneration/veterinary; Horse Diseases/therapy; Horses; Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins/therapeutic use; Ligaments/physiology; Platelet-Rich Plasma/physiology; Regeneration; Regenerative Medicine/methods; Stem Cells/physiology; Tendon Injuries/therapy/veterinary; Tendons/physiology; Tissue Scaffolds/veterinary  
  Abstract Conventional treatments of equine tendon injuries lead to an unsatisfactory healing process that usually results in a relatively high recurrence rate. Therefore, in recent years so-called regenerative therapeutics were studied scientifically in vitro and in laboratory animals. These include substances that ideally lead to the formation of replacement tissue, which in contrast to the low quality scar, has similar functional properties as the original intact tendon. Currently, a plethora of different substrates is either commercially available or can be produced in practice with the help of kits. The current knowledge on the production and the regenerative potential of nucleated cells like stem cells from bone marrow and fat tissue, of the blood products PRP (platelet rich plasma), ACP (autologous conditioned plasma), ACS (autologous conditioned serum) and of the scaffold substance UBM (urinary bladder matrix) are presented. Finally, the potential of some growth factors and of gene therapy is considered. Currently, it is assumed that the regeneration of tendon tissue is promoted by a complex interaction of scaffolds, growth factors and cells. At present, only very few studies are available which allow a comparison between these substances. Studies on the effect of regenerative substrates on tendons in live horses are presented elsewhere.  
  Address Fachtierarzt fur Pferde, Stiftung Tierarztliche Hochschule Hannover, Klinik fur Pferde, Bunteweg 9, 30559 Hannover. Florian.Geburek@tiho-hannover.de  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language German Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2011/12/15  
  ISSN 1434-1220 (Print) 1434-1220 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, Web of Science and Google searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1103 Serial 2430  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Getaneh, A.M.; Gebremedhin, E.Z. doi  openurl
  Title Meta-analysis of the prevalence of mastitis and associated risk factors in dairy cattle in Ethiopia Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Tropical Animal Health and Production Abbreviated Journal Trop Anim Health Prod  
  Volume 49 Issue 4 Pages 697-705  
  Keywords Cattle; Bovines; Cows; Mastitis; Prevalence; Risk Factors; Dairy cattle; Ethiopia  
  Abstract Mastitis is among the most prevalent disease that contributes for the reduction of milk production in dairy herds. Although several published studies have estimated the prevalence of mastitis, variation among studies is great. The objective of the present meta-analysis was to provide a pooled estimate of the prevalence of overall, clinical, and subclinical mastitis in dairy cattle in Ethiopia. A pooled estimate was also conducted by potential risk factors. The literature search was restricted to studies published in English language from January 2002 to June 2016. Meta-analysis of 39 studies was done under random effects model using metafor package in R software. The pooled estimate of the overall prevalence of mastitis on cow-basis was found to be 47.0% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 42.0, 52.0). The pooled prevalence with the 95% CI for clinical and subclinical mastitis was 8.3% (95% CI = 6.5, 10.3) and 37% (95% CI = 32.9, 40.7) respectively. There is a statistically significant and high heterogeneity of the prevalence estimates between published studies. The odds of occurrence of mastitis were higher in cows at early (odds ratio [OR] = 1.6; 95% CI = 1.4, 1.8) and late lactation (OR = 1.3; 95% CI = 1.2, 1.5) than mid lactation, in cows with 3-4 (OR = 1.5; 95% CI = 1.4, 1.7) and >4 parity number (OR = 2.9; 95% CI = 2.6, 3.4) than those with 1-2 parity number. Previous history of mastitis, floor type, milking hygiene, and udder injury had also statistically significant effect on pooled prevalence of mastitis (P < 0.05). The present study reported that there is high prevalence of mastitis in dairy cows in Ethiopia, which could contribute to the low productivity in lactating cows. The statistically significant association of risk factors such as floor type, milking hygiene, and presence of udder injury with mastitis may suggest that dairy farmers can reduce the occurrence of the disease by improving their management practices.  
  Address College of Agriculture and Veterinary Science, Department of Veterinary Laboratory Technology, Ambo University, P. O. Box 19, Ambo, Ethiopia. abrahamgetaneh@yahoo.com. College of Agriculture and Veterinary Science, Department of Veterinary Laboratory Technology, Ambo University, P. O. Box 19, Ambo, Ethiopia.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2017/02/12  
  ISSN 1573-7438 (Electronic) 0049-4747 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, Science Direct, Google Scholar, and journals such as “Mastitis” and “Ethiopia” searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1440 Serial 2892  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Giannotti, J. di G.; Packer, I.U.; Mercadante, M.E.Z. url  doi
openurl 
  Title [Meta-analysis for heritability of estimates growth traits in beef cattle] Type Journal Article
  Year 2005 Publication Revista Brasileira de Zootecnia Abbreviated Journal Rev Bras Zootecn  
  Volume 34 Issue 4 Pages 1173-1180  
  Keywords Meat Producing Animals [LL120]; Animal Genetics and Breeding [LL240]; Mathematics and Statistics [ZZ100]; beef cattle; birth weight; body weight; growth; heritability; least squares; statistical analysis; weaning weight; cattle; zebu; Bos; Bovidae; ruminants; Artiodactyla; mammals; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; ungulates; eukaryotes; heritable characters; meta-analysis; statistical methods; [Indexed using CAB Thesaurus terms]  
  Abstract A meta-analysis was conducted to summarize published heritability estimates of growth traits of zebu beef cattle in 186 reports. The factors affecting weighed heritability estimates were analysed by the least square means method for a model including fixed effects. Breed and estimation method were the significant factors in the four growth traits (birth weight, weaning weight, weight at 365 days and weight at 550 days). Estimation method is always recommended to summarize these estimates. The pooled heritability estimates for birth weight, weaning weight, weight at 365 days old and weight at 550 days old were 0.30+or-0.01, 0.23+or-0.01, 0.27+or-0.01 and 0.31+or-0.01, respectively. Meta-analysis techniques are recommended for polling of genetic parameters of zebu beef cattle.  
  Address Instituto de Economia Agricola – IEA, Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil. juliana@iea.sp.gov.br  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Portuguese Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1516-3598 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes CAB (Abstracts?) and AGRIS searched. Database record copyright CAB International 2010 Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 326 Serial 2432  
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