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Author (up) Duffield, T.F.; Rabiee, A.R.; Lean, I.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A meta-analysis of the impact of monensin in lactating dairy cattle. Part 1. Metabolic effects Type Journal Article
  Year 2008 Publication Journal of Dairy Science Abbreviated Journal J Dairy Sci  
  Volume 91 Issue 4 Pages 1334-1346  
  Keywords 3-Hydroxybutyric Acid/blood; Animal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena; Animals; Blood Glucose/analysis/drug effects; Cattle/blood/metabolism; Dairying; Fatty Acids, Nonesterified/blood; Female; Ionophores/pharmacology; Monensin/pharmacology; Cattle  
  Abstract A meta-analysis of the impact of monensin on metabolism of dairy cattle was conducted following a search of the literature. A total of 59 studies with monensin feeding in dairy cattle were identified in which 30 papers and 45 trials contained metabolic data. The beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHBA) data were obtained from over 4,000 cows and 115 trial sites. Data for each trial were extracted and analyzed using meta-analysis software in Stata. Estimated effect sizes of monensin were calculated on blood concentrations of BHBA, acetoacetate, nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA), glucose, cholesterol, urea, calcium, insulin, and milk urea. Monensin use in lactating dairy cattle significantly reduced blood concentrations of BHBA 13%, acetoacetate 14%, and NEFA 7%. Monensin increased glucose 3% and urea 6%. Monensin had no significant effect on cholesterol, calcium, milk urea, or insulin. Heterogeneity was significant for BHBA and cholesterol [I(2) (measure of variation beyond chance) = 37 and 54%, respectively]; therefore, random effects models were used for those analytes. Publication bias existed with the monensin effect on BHBA, with a tendency for studies to be published if there was a significant reduction in this ketone. Meta-regression analysis of the effect sizes obtained from the metabolic data showed that method of delivery, timing of administration, stage of lactation, and diet were influential in modifying effect size of monensin treatment. Use of top dress or delivery via a controlled release capsule reduced the magnitude of effect on BHBA (coefficient +0.353); however, top dress use compared with controlled release capsule or total mixed ration enhanced the monensin effect on glucose (coefficient +0.296). There was a greater impact with monensin on reducing BHBA in early lactation (coefficient -0.151) and in pasture-based trials (coefficient -0.194). Use of monensin in both the pre- and postcalving periods was associated with an enhanced impact on NEFA (coefficient -0.254). Monensin had less impact on serum glucose in the pre-calving time period (coefficient -0.237). These findings demonstrate an improvement in the energy metabolism of dairy cows supplemented with monensin.  
  Address Department of Population Medicine, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, N1G 2W1 Canada. tduffiel@uoguelph.ca  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2008/03/20  
  ISSN 1525-3198 (Electronic) 0022-0302 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, AGRICOLA, CAB (Abstracts?) and Google Scholar searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 657 Serial 2403  
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Author (up) Dufour, S.; Frechette, A.; Barkema, H.W.; Mussell, A.; Scholl, D.T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Invited review: effect of udder health management practices on herd somatic cell count Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Journal of Dairy Science Abbreviated Journal J Dairy Sci  
  Volume 94 Issue 2 Pages 563-579  
  Keywords Algorithms; Animals; Cattle; Cell Count/veterinary; Dairying/instrumentation/methods; Female; Mammary Glands, Animal/physiology; Milk/cytology/secretion  
  Abstract A systematic review of the scientific literature on relationships between management practices used on dairy farms and herd somatic cell count (SCC) was undertaken to distinguish those management practices that have been consistently shown to be associated with herd SCC from those lacking evidence of association. Relevant literature was identified using a combination of database searches (PubMed, Medline, CAB, Agricola, and Web of Science) and iterative screening of references. To be included in the review, a manuscript had to be published after 1979 in French, English, or Dutch; study design had to be other than case report or case series; herds studied had to be composed of >/= 40 milking cows producing on average >/= 7,000kg of milk in 305 d; interventions studied had to be management practices applied at the herd level and used as udder health control strategies; and SCC had to be measured using electronic cell counting methods. The 36 manuscripts selected were mainly observational cross-sectional studies; 8 manuscripts dealt exclusively with automatic milking systems and 4 with management of calves and heifers and its effect on SCC in early lactation heifers. Most practices having consistent associations with SCC were related to milking procedures: wearing gloves during milking, using automatic take-offs, using postmilking teat dipping, milking problem cows last, yearly inspection of the milking system, and use of a technique to keep cows standing following milking; all were consistently associated with lower herd SCC. Other practices associated with lower SCC were the use of a freestall system, sand bedding, cleaning the calving pen after each calving, surveillance of dry-cow udders for mastitis, use of blanket dry-cow therapy, parenteral selenium supplementation, udder hair management, and frequent use of the California Mastitis Test. Regarding SCC of heifers, most of the consistent associations reported were related to interventions made during the peripartum period. Studies on automatic milking systems have frequently reported elevation of the herd SCC following transition to the new system. These elevations seemed to be mediated both by the lack of monitoring of chronically infected cows and by an elevated incidence of intramammary infections. By assembling the results reported in many different studies, this review generates a more comprehensive understanding of the management practices influencing SCC and highlights areas of SCC control knowledge that lack evidence of effectiveness.  
  Address Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Montreal, C.P. 5000, St-Hyacinthe, Quebec, J2S 7C6, Canada. simon.dufour@umontreal.ca  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2011/01/25  
  ISSN 1525-3198 (Electronic) 0022-0302 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, MEDLINE, CAB, AGRICOLA and Web of Science searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 658 Serial 2404  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Duncan, A.J.; Gunn, G.J.; Humphry, R.W. doi  openurl
  Title Difficulties arising from the variety of testing schemes used for bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Veterinary Record Abbreviated Journal Vet Rec  
  Volume 178 Issue 12 Pages 292  
  Keywords Cattle; Bovine; Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV); Epidemiology; Eradication schemes  
  Abstract Globally, the eradication of bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) is still in its infancy, but eradication has been, or is being, adopted by several countries or regions. Comparisons between countries' schemes allow others to assess best practice, and aggregating published results from eradication schemes provides greater statistical power when analysing data. Aggregating data requires that results derived from different testing schemes be calibrated against one another. The authors aimed to evaluate whether relationships between published BVDV test results could be created and present the outcome of a systematic literature review following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. The results are tabulated, providing a summary of papers where there is potential cross-calibration and a summary of the obstacles preventing such data aggregation. Although differences in measuring BVDV present barriers to academic progress, they may also affect progress within individual eradication schemes. The authors examined the time taken to retest following an initial antibody BVDV test in the Scottish eradication scheme. The authors demonstrate that retesting occurred quicker if the initial not negative test was from blood rather than milk samples. Such differences in the response of farmers/veterinarians to tests may be of interest to the design of future schemes.  
  Address Inverness College UHI, 1 Inverness Campus, Inverness IV2 5NA, UK Epidemiology Research Unit, SRUC (Scotland's Rural College), Drummondhill, Stratherrick Road, Inverness IV2 4JZ, UK. Epidemiology Research Unit, SRUC (Scotland's Rural College), Drummondhill, Stratherrick Road, Inverness IV2 4JZ, UK.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2016/02/13  
  ISSN 2042-7670 (Electronic) 0042-4900 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Web of Science (Web of Knowledge) searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1406 Serial 2868  
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Author (up) Dunkel, B.; Johns, I.C. doi  openurl
  Title Antimicrobial use in critically ill horses Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Journal of veterinary emergency and critical care (San Antonio, Tex. : 2001) Abbreviated Journal J Vet Emerg Crit Care (San Antonio)  
  Volume 25 Issue 1 Pages 89-100  
  Keywords Horses; [Indexed using CAB Thesaurus terms]  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To discuss controversies surrounding antimicrobial use in critically ill horses. DATA SOURCES: PubMed searches from 1970-present for terms including, but not limited to: “horse,” “foal,” “antimicrobial,” “prophylaxis,” “infection,” “surgery,” “sepsis,” and “antimicrobial resistance.” HUMAN DATA SYNTHESIS: Increasing bacterial antimicrobial resistance has changed first-line antimicrobial choices and prompted shortening of the duration of prophylactic and therapeutic treatment. The need to decrease bacterial resistance development to critically important antimicrobials has been highlighted. VETERINARY DATA SYNTHESIS: Veterinary medicine has followed a similar trend but often without a high-level evidence. Common dilemmas include diseases in which the theoretically most effective drug is a reserved antimicrobial, the inability to differentiate infectious from noninfectious disease, the duration and necessity of prophylactic antimicrobials and use of antimicrobials in primary gastrointestinal disease. These problems are illustrated using examples of purulent infections, neonatal sepsis, colic surgery, and treatment of colitis. Although enrofloxacin, cephalosporins, and doxycycline, in contrast to gentamicin, reach therapeutic concentrations within the lungs of healthy horses, the first two should not be used as first line treatment due to their reserved status. Due to the high risk of bacterial sepsis, antimicrobial treatment remains indispensable in compromised neonatal foals but shortening the length of antimicrobial treatment might be prudent. One prospective randomized study demonstrated no difference between 3 and 5 days of perioperative antimicrobial treatment in colic surgery but shorter durations were not evaluated. High-level evidence to recommend antimicrobial treatment of adult horses with undifferentiated diarrhea does not exist. CONCLUSIONS: Few evidence-based recommendations can be made. Commonly used antimicrobial combinations remain the mainstay for treating purulent infections. Antimicrobial treatment for compromised foals should not extend beyond recovery. Continuation of prophylactic antimicrobials >3 days is likely unnecessary after colic surgery; shorter durations might be equally effective. Antimicrobial prophylaxis in adult horses with diarrhea is unlikely to be beneficial.  
  Address Department of Clinical Science and Services, The Royal Veterinary College, North Mymms, Hatfield, Hertforshire, United Kingdom, United Kingdom.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2015/01/15  
  ISSN 1476-4431 (Electronic) 1476-4431 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed searched. Database record copyright CAB International 2010. Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1348 Serial 2821  
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Author (up) Dutton-Regester, K.J.; Barnes, T.S.; Wright, J.D.; Alawneh, J.I.; Rabiee, A.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A systematic review of tests for the detection and diagnosis of foot lesions causing lameness in dairy cows Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Preventive Veterinary Medicine Abbreviated Journal Prev Vet Med  
  Volume 149 Issue Pages 53-66  
  Keywords Dairy cows; Lameness; DCows; Cattle; Bovines  
  Abstract Foot lesions causing lameness in dairy cows are important economic and welfare issues. Prompt and correct detection and diagnosis are critical for improving economic and welfare outcomes. Few tests are currently available to aid the dairy farmer in the detection and diagnosis of foot lesions. The objectives of this systematic review were to identify those tests that have been investigated for the detection and diagnosis of foot lesions causing lameness in dairy cows, evaluate the methodological quality of the studies investigating the identified tests, compare the accuracy of the identified test, and determine which tests can be recommended for implementation on the farm based on accuracy and practicality for use by dairy farmers. A comprehensive literature search resulted in 2137 papers. After removing duplicates and performing relevance screening, 12 papers with 20 studies met the inclusion criteria. Pertinent data from each study were extracted using a standardised form. Eligible studies were grouped based on the objective of the test under investigation, resulting in the following groups of disorders: lameness, foot lesions, sole ulcer, and digital dermatitis. Methodological quality was assessed using the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (QUADAS-2) tool which includes four domains: animal selection, index test, reference test and flow and timing. Incomplete reporting in the studies limited the assessment of methodological quality. The animal selection domain was particularly poorly reported. No single study could be classified as being at low risk of bias across all domains of the QUADAS-2 tool. One automated test was identified, while all others were manually operated. No studies reported the cost of the test in question and only two studies reported the time taken to carry out the procedures involved with using the test in question. It was not possible to compare the accuracy of these tests or recommend which tests are suitable for implementation on the farm. This was due to incomplete reporting of information and significant risk of bias in all studies.  
  Address The University of Queensland, School of Veterinary Science, Gatton, Queensland, 4343, Australia. Electronic address: katejanedr@gmail.com. The University of Queensland, School of Veterinary Science, Gatton, Queensland, 4343, Australia; The University of Queensland, Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation, Gatton, Queensland, 4343, Australia. Electronic address: t.barnes@uq.edu.au. The University of Queensland, School of Veterinary Science, Gatton, Queensland, 4343, Australia. Electronic address: j.wright2@uq.edu.au. The University of Queensland, School of Veterinary Science, Gatton, Queensland, 4343, Australia. CSA Analytics, Horsley, NSW, 2530, Australia. Electronic address: ahmadr@csaanalytics.com.au.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Enlgish Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2018/01/02  
  ISSN 1873-1716 (Electronic) 0167-5877 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, using medical subject headings (MeSH) (1951-February 2015); Web of Science, Core Collection, advanced search (1990-February 2015); and Agricola, advanced search in both the Article Citation Database and National Agricultural Library (NAL) catalogue (1970-February 2015) searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1685 Serial 2938  
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Author (up) Dzikamunhenga, R.S.; Anthony, R.; Coetzee, J.; Gould, S.; Johnson, A.; Karriker, L.; McKean, J.; Millman, S.T.; Niekamp, S.R.; O'Connor, A.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Pain management in the neonatal piglet during routine management procedures. Part 1: a systematic review of randomized and non-randomized intervention studies Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Animal Health Research Reviews Abbreviated Journal Anim Health Res Rev  
  Volume 15 Issue 1 Pages 14-38  
  Keywords Pigs; Swine; Analgesia  
  Abstract Routine procedures carried out on piglets (i.e. castration, tail docking, teeth clipping, and ear notching) are considered painful. Unfortunately the efficacy of current pain mitigation modalities is poorly understood. The aim of this systematic review was to synthesize the existing primary scientific literature regarding the effectiveness of pain management interventions used for routine procedures on piglets. The review question was, 'In piglets under twenty-eight days old, undergoing castration, tail docking, teeth clipping, and/or methods of identification that involve cutting of the ear tissue, what is the effect of pain mitigation compared with no pain mitigation on behavioral and non-behavioral outcomes that indicate procedural pain and post-procedural pain?' A review protocol was designed a priori. Data sources used were Agricola (EBSCO), CAB Abstracts (Thomson Reuters), PubMed, Web of Science (Thomson Reuters), BIOSIS Previews (Thomson Reuters), and ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Full Text. No restrictions on year of publication or language were placed on the search. Eligible studies assessed an intervention designed to mitigate the pain of the procedures of interest and included a comparison group that did not receive an intervention. Eligible non-English studies were translated using a translation service. Two reviewers independently screened titles and abstracts for relevance using pre-defined questions. Data were extracted from relevant articles onto pre-defined forms. From the 2203 retrieved citations forty publications, containing 52 studies met the eligibility criteria. In 40 studies, piglets underwent castration only. In seven studies, piglets underwent tail docking only. In one study, piglets underwent teeth clipping only, and in one study piglets underwent ear notching only. Three studies used multiple procedures. Thirty-two trial arms assessed general anesthesia protocols, 30 trial arms assessed local anesthetic protocols, and 28 trial arms assessed non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) protocols. Forty-one trial arms were controls where piglets received either placebo or no treatment. Forty-five outcomes were extracted from the studies, however only the results from studies that assessed cortisol (six studies), beta -endorphins (one study), vocalisations (nine studies), and pain-related behaviors (nine studies) are reported. Other outcomes were reported in only one or two studies. Confident decision making will likely be difficult based on this body of work because lack of comprehensive reporting precludes calculation of the magnitude of pain mitigation for most outcomes.  
  Address Department of Veterinary Diagnostic and Production Animal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa, USA. oconnor@iastate.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1466-2523 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes CAB Abstracts, BIOSIS Previews, Web of Science, PubMed, Agricola, ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Full Text and Swine Information Library searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 2642 Serial 2742  
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Author (up) EFSA Panel on Animal Health and Welfare(AHAW) url  doi
openurl 
  Title Scientific opinion on the electrical requirements for waterbath stunning equipment applicable for poultry Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication EFSA Journal Abbreviated Journal EFSA Journal  
  Volume 10 Issue 6 Pages  
  Keywords Meat Producing Animals [LL120]; Animal Slaughter [LL190]; Techniques and Methodology [ZZ900]; abattoirs; efficacy; electric current; electroencephalography; electronarcosis; equipment; hygiene; literature reviews; measurement; methodology; poultry; reviews; stunning; surveillance; systematic reviews; fowls; European Union Countries; Europe; Gallus gallus; Gallus; Phasianidae; Galliformes; birds; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; eukaryotes; chickens; domesticated birds; EEG; electrical anaesthesia; electrical current; electrical stunning; methods; metrology; slaughterhouses; [Indexed using CAB Thesaurus terms]  
  Abstract The Commission requested that EFSA review relevant new scientific references on electrical stunning of poultry and to recommend, if necessary, new electrical requirements applicable for waterbath stunning equipment. A systematic literature review was conducted to determine those electrical parameters that would deliver an effective stun so that birds would be rendered unconscious and insensible until death. Inspection data from slaughterhouse inspections conducted both in Member States in and non-Member States were included. Many of the published studies did not allow a comprehensive analysis due to different study designs and incomplete data. There are few observational studies in abattoirs to determine the numbers of birds that are effectively stunned, however, the inspection data from the Food and Veterinary Office (FVO) did not identify major problems but, for practical reasons, they used non-EEG (electro-encephalogram) methods to ascertain the effectiveness of a stun. At the present time, an EEG is the most reliable indicator of unconsciousness and insensibility. Clinical somatosensory indicators are not as reliable. The aim of a stunning system is to achieve a 100% effective stun, and the most effective electrical parameters in use can achieve an effectiveness of up to 96% as measured using EEG ascertainment methods (100% were reported as unconscious using non-EEG methods). It is recommended that the Regulation should indicate minimum current for each bird, frequency and current type as well as the wave characteristics – duty cycle and waveform. There should be better surveillance and monitoring of the electrical parameters in use at abattoirs and, in addition, methods that allow the accurate measurement of actual electrical current flowing through each bird should be further developed. Research on effective stunning should be validated by the measurement of EEG activity and related to clinical measures that are easier to use in practice.  
  Address European Food Safety Authority (EFSA), Parma, Italy. ahaw@efsa.europa.eu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1831-4732 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes CAB Abstracts, CCC, FSTA, Web of Science and PubMed searched. Database record copyright CAB International 2010 Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 534 Serial 2405  
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Author (up) Egea-Serrano, A.; Relyea, R.A.; Tejedo, M.; Torralva, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Understanding of the impact of chemicals on amphibians: a meta-analytic review Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Ecology and Evolution Abbreviated Journal Ecol Evol  
  Volume 2 Issue 7 Pages 1382-1397  
  Keywords Toxicology and Poisoning (Wild Animals) [YY900]; exposure; heavy metals; meta-analysis; nitrogenous compounds; pesticides; phosphorus; pollutants; reviews; survival; toxic substances; wastewater; wild animals; Amphibia; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; eukaryotes; poisons; waste water; amphibians; [Indexed using CAB Thesaurus terms]  
  Abstract Many studies have assessed the impact of different pollutants on amphibians across a variety of experimental venues (laboratory, mesocosm, and enclosure conditions). Past reviews, using vote-counting methods, have described pollution as one of the major threats faced by amphibians. However, vote-counting methods lack strong statistical power, do not permit one to determine the magnitudes of effects, and do not compare responses among predefined groups. To address these challenges, we conducted a meta-analysis of experimental studies that measured the effects of different chemical pollutants (nitrogenous and phosphorous compounds, pesticides, road deicers, heavy metals, and other wastewater contaminants) at environmentally relevant concentrations on amphibian survival, mass, time to hatching, time to metamorphosis, and frequency of abnormalities. The overall effect size of pollutant exposure was a medium decrease in amphibian survival and mass and a large increase in abnormality frequency. This translates to a 14.3% decrease in survival, a 7.5% decrease in mass, and a 535% increase in abnormality frequency across all studies. In contrast, we found no overall effect of pollutants on time to hatching and time to metamorphosis. We also found that effect sizes differed among experimental venues and among types of pollutants, but we only detected weak differences among amphibian families. These results suggest that variation in sensitivity to contaminants is generally independent of phylogeny. Some publication bias (i.e., selective reporting) was detected, but only for mass and the interaction effect size among stressors. We conclude that the overall impact of pollution on amphibians is moderately to largely negative. This implies that pollutants at environmentally relevant concentrations pose an important threat to amphibians and may play a role in their present global decline.  
  Address Facultad de Biologia, Departamento de Zoologia y Antropologia Fisica, Universidad de Murcia, 30100 Murcia, Spain. aegea@um.es  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2045-7758 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Web of Science, BIOSIS Previews, ScienceDirect and Scirus searched. Database record copyright CAB International 2010 Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 887 Serial 2406  
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Author (up) Ekong, P.S.; Sanderson, M.W.; Cernicchiaro, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Prevalence and concentration of Escherichia coli O157 in different seasons and cattle types processed in North America: A systematic review and meta-analysis of published research Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Preventive Veterinary Medicine Abbreviated Journal Prev Vet Med  
  Volume 121 Issue 1-2 Pages 74-85  
  Keywords Cattle; E. coli  
  Abstract Systematic review (SR) and meta-analyses (MA) methodologies were used to identify, critically evaluate and synthesize prevalence and concentration estimates for Escherichia coli O157 contamination along the beef production chain, and to illustrate differences based on cattle types and seasonality in North America from the scientific peer-reviewed literature. Four electronic databases were searched to identify relevant articles. Two independent reviewers performed all SR steps. Random effects MA models were used to estimate the pooled prevalence and concentration of E. coli O157 in feces, hides and carcasses of cattle processed in North America, including their seasonal estimates. The potential sources of between studies heterogeneity were identified using meta-regression and sub-group analysis. Results indicated differences in the fecal prevalence of E. coli O157 among cattle types: 10.68% (95% CI: 9.17-12.28%) in fed beef, 4.65% (95% CI: 3.37-6.10%) in adult beef, and 1.79% (95% CI: 1.20-2.48%) in adult dairy. Fed beef fecal prevalence was 10.65% (95% CI: 8.93-12.49%) during summer and 9.17% (95% CI: 5.24-13.98%) during the winter months. For adult beef, the fecal prevalence was 7.86% (95% CI: 5.43-10.66%) during summer, and 4.21% (95% CI: 1.95-7.13%) during winter. Among adult dairy, the fecal prevalence was 2.27% (95% CI: 1.5-3.18%) during summer, and 0.36% (95% CI: 0.09-0.74%) during winter. There was a significantly higher percentage of hides with E. coli O157 concentration >/= 40 CFU/100 cm(2) on hides of fed beef sampled at the processing plant (23.81%; 95% CI: 14.79-34.15%) compared to those sampled at the feedlot (1.74%; 95% CI: 0.53-3.44%). Prevalence of E. coli O157 on carcass surfaces differed by season only at the post-evisceration stage, but decreased considerably through the subsequent processing stages. Country, study setting, detection method, hide swab area, and study design were identified as significant sources of heterogeneity among studies reporting prevalence of E. coli O157 along the beef production chain. The pooled prevalence and concentration estimates from this study provide a sound and reliable microbiological basis for risk assessment modeling of E. coli O157 and other pathogens in the food chain.  
  Address Department of Diagnostic Medicine/Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, USA.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2015/07/15  
  ISSN 1873-1716 (Electronic) 0167-5877 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Agricola (EBSCO), CAB Abstracts, Food Science and Technology Abstracts (FSTA), and PubMed searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1361 Serial 2832  
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Author (up) Eltholth, M.M.; Marsh, V.R.; Van Winden, S.; Guitian, F.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Contamination of food products with Mycobacterium avium paratuberculosis: a systematic review Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication Journal of Applied Microbiology Abbreviated Journal J Appl Microbiol  
  Volume 107 Issue 4 Pages 1061-1071  
  Keywords Animals; Cattle; Cattle Diseases/epidemiology; Crohn Disease/microbiology; Dairying; Food Contamination/analysis/prevention & control; Food Handling; Food Microbiology; Goats; Humans; Meat/microbiology; Meat Products/microbiology; Milk/microbiology; Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis; Paratuberculosis/epidemiology/microbiology/prevention & control; Sheep; Sterilization/methods  
  Abstract Although a causal link between Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) and Crohn's disease has not been proved, previous studies suggest that the potential routes of human exposure to MAP should be investigated. We conducted a systematic review of literature concerning the likelihood of contamination of food products with MAP and the likely changes in the quantity of MAP in dairy and meat products along their respective production chains. Relevant data were extracted from 65 research papers and synthesized qualitatively. Although estimates of the prevalence of Johne's disease are scarce, particularly for non-dairy herds, the available data suggest that the likelihood of contamination of raw milk with MAP in most studied regions is substantial. The presence of MAP in raw and pasteurized milk has been the subject of several studies which show that pasteurized milk is not always MAP-free and that the effectiveness of pasteurization in inactivating MAP depends on the initial concentration of the agent in raw milk. The most recent studies indicated that beef can be contaminated with MAP via dissemination of the pathogen in the tissues of infected animals. Currently available data suggests that the likelihood of dairy and meat products being contaminated with MAP on retail sale should not be ignored.  
  Address Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Royal Veterinary College, Hawkshead Lane, Hatfield, Hertfordshire AL9 7TA, UK. meltholth@rvc.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2009/06/03  
  ISSN 1365-2672 (Electronic) 1364-5072 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, CAB Direct (CAB Abstracts?) and Science Direct searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 659 Serial 2407  
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Author (up) Elwood, C.; Devauchelle, P.; Elliott, J.; Freiche, V.; German, A.J.; Gualtieri, M.; Hall, E.; den Hertog, E.; Neiger, R.; Peeters, D.; Roura, X.; Savary-Bataille, K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Emesis in dogs: a review Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication Journal of Small Animal Practice Abbreviated Journal J Small Anim Pract  
  Volume 51 Issue 1 Pages 4-22  
  Keywords Animals; Antiemetics/therapeutic use; Antineoplastic Agents/adverse effects; Diet/veterinary; Dog Diseases/chemically induced/diagnosis/etiology/therapy; Dogs; Vomiting/diagnosis/etiology/therapy/veterinary  
  Abstract Emesis is a common presenting sign in small animal practice. It requires a rational approach to management that is based upon a sound understanding of pathophysiology combined with logical decision making. This review, which assesses the weight of available evidence, outlines the physiology of the vomiting reflex, causes of emesis, the consequences of emesis and the approach to clinical management of the vomiting dog. The applicability of diagnostic testing modalities and the merit of traditional approaches to management, such as dietary changes, are discussed. The role and usefulness of both traditional and novel anti-emetic drugs is examined, including in specific circumstances such as following cytotoxic drug treatment. The review also examines areas in which common clinical practice is not necessarily supported by objective evidence and, as such, highlights questions worthy of further clinical research.  
  Address Davies Veterinary Specialists, Manor Farm Business Park, Higham Gobion, Hitchin, Hertfordshire SG5 3HR.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2010/02/09  
  ISSN 1748-5827 (Electronic) 0022-4510 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Google Scholar, Web of Science and PubMed searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 873 Serial 2408  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Erdreich, L.S.; Alexander, D.D.; Wagner, M.E.; Reinemann, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Meta-analysis of stray voltage on dairy cattle Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication Journal of Dairy Science Abbreviated Journal J Dairy Sci  
  Volume 92 Issue 12 Pages 5951-5963  
  Keywords Animals; Behavior, Animal/physiology; Cattle/physiology; Dairying/methods; Electricity; Female; Lactation/physiology; Milk/secretion; Time Factors; Cattle  
  Abstract A quantitative assessment of dairy cow responses to contact current (stray voltage) at 50 or 60 Hz was conducted using meta-analysis and pooled analysis methodology. The objective was to more accurately quantify the minimum exposure level (threshold) at which dairy cows respond and to identify sources of heterogeneity among studies. Several medical and agricultural databases were used to locate individual studies for the systematic literature review, from which 22 published studies of stray voltage and behavioral response or milk yield met our inclusion criteria. Meta-analysis models were constructed to assess the percentage of cows with a behavioral response at documented exposure levels, and the summary relative risk estimate for all exposure pathways combined was calculated for each 1-mA increment from 1.0 through 5.0 mA. The meta-analysis of percentage response showed that cows exhibited statistically significant first behavioral responses at 3.0 mA, response probability increased with exposure levels, and exposure pathways contributed to heterogeneity in the model. The pooled analysis of mean behavioral response threshold was based on experimental studies of ascending series of current exposures on 355 cows. The overall weighted mean for first behavioral response to current was 4.0 mA. Ten of the studies that met the inclusion criteria addressed milk production, but heterogeneity in exposure pathways, patterns, and duration precluded meta-analysis or data pooling. The milk production studies ranged in size from 4 to 48 cows and used switchback or paired design to increase power. A qualitative narrative review of these studies indicated that production was not affected by exposure to contact current at levels of 3 mA or lower for exposures of up to 21 d or 4 wk.  
  Address Exponent Inc, 420 Lexington Avenue, Suite 1740, New York, NY 10170, USA. erdreich@exponent.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2009/11/20  
  ISSN 1525-3198 (Electronic) 0022-0302 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed and ASABE database searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 660 Serial 2409  
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Author (up) Erteld, E.; Krohn, J.; Dzhakupov, I.T.; Wehrend, A. url  openurl
  Title [Uterine torsion in cattle – therapy and consequences for calf and cow] Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Tierarztliche Praxis. Ausgabe G, Grosstiere/Nutztiere Abbreviated Journal Tierarztl Prax Ausg G Grosstiere Nutztiere  
  Volume 42 Issue 5 Pages 297-303  
  Keywords Cattle; Cows  
  Abstract AIM: To summarize the available literature on the therapy of uterine torsion in cattle and the consequences for cow and calf. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Analysis of the literature using electronic libraries (PubMed, Medline), German veterinary medical journals and obstetrical textbooks. RESULTS: The therapy includes the attempt to rotate the uterus back into its physiological position. Direct and indirect methods of retorsion are available and applied according to the case conditions. Subsequently, the extraction of the calf can be performed via vaginal delivery or caesarean section. The presence of uterine torsion always leads to dystocia. Following a successful retorsion, the time and degree of uterine torsion strongly influence the progress of the birth. The prognosis also depends on the aforementioned factors and varies between good to unsuccessful. The vitality of the calf displays great variation depending on the literature (14-90%), however, is generally greater under field than clinical conditions. Focussing on the puerperal development of the cow, all grades from mild irritations of the uterine involution to fatal complications occur. The influence on fertility depends on the progress of the birth and existing secondary complications. The risk for electrolyte disturbances is increased (approximately 50%) as is the risk of birth-associated injuries (approximately 20%). The incidence of placental retention varies widely between different authors (3-52%).  
  Address Prof. Dr. Axel Wehrend, Dipl. ECAR, Klinik fur Geburtshilfe, Gynakologie und Andrologie der Gross- und Kleintiere mit Tierarztlicher Ambulanz der Justus-Liebig-Universitat Giessen, Frankfurter Strasse 106, 35392 Giessen, E-Mail: Axel.Wehrend@vetmed.uni-giessen.de.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language German Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2014/10/21  
  ISSN 1434-1220 (Print) 1434-1220 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Pubmed and MEDLINE searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1289 Serial 2776  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Erteld, E.; Wehrend, A.; Goericke-Pesch, S. url  openurl
  Title [Uterine torsion in cattle – frequency, clinical symptoms and theories about the pathogenesis] Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Tierarztliche Praxis. Ausgabe G, Grosstiere/Nutztiere Abbreviated Journal Tierarztl Prax Ausg G Grosstiere Nutztiere  
  Volume 40 Issue 3 Pages 167-75; quiz 176  
  Keywords Cattle  
  Abstract Aim of the present study was to summarize the available literature about the incidence, frequency, clinical symptoms and ideas as to the pathogenesis of uterine torsion in the cow. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Analysis of the literature using electronic libraries (Pub Med, Medline), German veterinary medicine journals and obstetrical textbooks. RESULTS: Uterine torsion is a very important maternal reason for dystocia as most cases occur during parturition. The post-cervical torsion (combined uterine and vaginal torsion, Torsio uteri and vaginae) is more commonly diagnosed than an intra-cervical or pre-cervical torsion. Torsions to the left occur more frequently than to the right. Clinical symptoms clearly vary depending on the degree of torsion. The frequency in relation to all parturitions is described as between 0.5 and 1%, whereas the percentage of uterine torsions presented to the veterinarian as a reason for dystocia varies between 2.7 and 65%. The pathogenesis of uterine torsion remains unclear; however, general agreement exists that the cow is predisposed to uterine torsion due to its anatomy. It appears that the Brown Swiss is more often affected than other cattle breeds.  
  Address Klinik fur Geburtshilfe, Gynakologie und Andrologie der Gross- und Kleintiere mit Tierarztlicher Ambulanz, Justus-Liebig-Universitat Giessen, Frankfurter Strasse 106, 35392 Giessen.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language German Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2012/06/13  
  ISSN 1434-1220 (Print) 1434-1220 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed and MEDLINE searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 826 Serial 2410  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Evans, R.B.; Gordon-Evans, W.J.; Conzemius, M.G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Comparison of three methods for the management of fragmented medial coronoid process in the dog. A systematic review and meta-analysis Type Journal Article
  Year 2008 Publication Veterinary and Comparative Orthopaedics and Traumatology : V.C.O.T Abbreviated Journal Vet Comp Orthop Traumatol  
  Volume 21 Issue 2 Pages 106-109  
  Keywords Animals; Arthroscopy/methods/veterinary; Dog Diseases/pathology/surgery; Dogs; Joint Diseases/pathology/surgery/veterinary; Osteotomy/methods/veterinary; Treatment Outcome  
  Abstract The objective of this review and analysis was to compare arthroscopy, medial arthrotomy and medical management for treating fragmented coronoid process in the dog. The data come from manuscripts published in peer-reviewed veterinary journals, and the study design is a systematic review followed by meta-analysis. The meta-analysis combines data from a set of studies so that surgical techniques and medial management can be compared in a single analysis. Several literature databases and veterinary texts were thoroughly searched to provide a list of over 400 candidate manuscripts. Inclusion criteria were used to filter the candidate manuscripts to a final set of four manuscripts that directly pertained to the clinical question. They were scored for their evidentiary value using a semi-objective measure. The results were that arthroscopy was superior to medial arthrotomy and medical management, but medial arthrotomy was not superior to medical management. Only one manuscript was a randomized controlled trial, hence the results must be tempered by the evidentiary value of the data.  
  Address Iowa State University, VDPAM / College of Veterinary Medicine, Ames, Iowa, 50011 USA. revans@iastate.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2008/06/12  
  ISSN 0932-0814 (Print) 0932-0814 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, VIN and CAB searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 661 Serial 2411  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Faggion, C.M., Jr.; Listl, S.; Giannakopoulos, N.N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The methodological quality of systematic reviews of animal studies in dentistry Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Veterinary Journal (London, England : 1997) Abbreviated Journal Vet J  
  Volume 192 Issue 2 Pages 140-147  
  Keywords Animal Experimentation; Animals; Checklist; Dental Research/standards; Dentistry; Meta-Analysis as Topic; Research Design/standards; Review Literature as Topic  
  Abstract Systematic reviews and meta-analyses of animal studies are important for improving estimates of the effects of treatment and for guiding future clinical studies on humans. The purpose of this systematic review was to assess the methodological quality of systematic reviews and meta-analyses of animal studies in dentistry through using a validated checklist. A literature search was conducted independently and in duplicate in the PubMed and LILACS databases. References in selected systematic reviews were assessed to identify other studies not captured by the electronic searches. The methodological quality of studies was assessed independently and in duplicate by using the AMSTAR checklist; the quality was scored as low, moderate, or high. The reviewers were calibrated before the assessment and agreement between them was assessed using Cohen's Kappa statistic. Of 444 studies retrieved, 54 systematic reviews were selected after full-text assessment. Agreement between the reviewers was regarded as excellent. Only two studies were scored as high quality; 17 and 35 studies were scored as medium and low quality, respectively. There is room for improvement of the methodological quality of systematic reviews of animal studies in dentistry. Checklists, such as AMSTAR, can guide researchers in planning and executing systematic reviews and meta-analyses. For determining the need for additional investigations in animals and in order to provide good data for potential application in human, such reviews should be based on animal experiments performed according to sound methodological principles.  
  Address Department of Prosthodontics, Dental School, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. Clovis.Faggion@med.uni-heidelberg.de  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2011/09/20  
  ISSN 1532-2971 (Electronic) 1090-0233 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, LILACS, Google Scholar and OpenSIGLE searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 662 Serial 2412  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Fahie, M.A.; Shettko, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evidence-based wound management: a systematic review of therapeutic agents to enhance granulation and epithelialization Type Journal Article
  Year 2007 Publication Veterinary Clinics of North America. Small Animal Practice Abbreviated Journal Vet Clin North Am Small Anim Pract  
  Volume 37 Issue 3 Pages 559-577  
  Keywords Animals; Bandages/veterinary; Dogs/injuries; Epithelium/pathology; Evidence-Based Medicine; Female; Granulation Tissue/pathology; Male; Veterinary Medicine/methods/standards; Wound Healing/physiology; Wounds and Injuries/therapy/veterinary; Dogs  
  Abstract Successful management of open wounds in dogs requires knowledge of the physiology of wound healing and application of that knowledge to choose appropriate therapeutic intervention. The authors' objective was to investigate whether or not there are any available therapeutic agents that enhance granulation or epithelialization of open wounds in dogs. Based on the literature identified in the authors' review, there is insufficient evidence to make a recommendation for or against any of the topical wound agents or procedures studied.  
  Address Small Animal Surgery, Western University of Health Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, 309 East Second Street, Pomona, CA 91766, USA. mfahie@westernu.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2007/05/01  
  ISSN 0195-5616 (Print) 0195-5616 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed and VIN searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 663 Serial 2413  
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Author (up) Fajt, V.R.; Van House, A.M.; Honnas, C.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title What is the evidence? In horses with septic bursitis for which the organism has not yet been identified, is IV regional perfusion with amikacin or cefotaxime likely to be effective? Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association Abbreviated Journal J Am Vet Med Assoc  
  Volume 236 Issue 6 Pages 636-638  
  Keywords Amikacin/administration & dosage/therapeutic use; Animals; Anti-Bacterial Agents/administration & dosage/therapeutic use; Arthritis, Infectious/diagnosis/drug therapy/veterinary; Bursitis/diagnosis/drug therapy/veterinary; Cefotaxime/administration & dosage/therapeutic use; Evidence-Based Practice; Female; Horse Diseases/diagnosis/drug therapy; Horses; Lameness, Animal/diagnosis  
  Abstract  
  Address Departments of Veterinary Physiology and Pharmacology, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843, USA. vfajt@cvm.tamu.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2010/03/17  
  ISSN 0003-1488 (Print) 0003-1488 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed and proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the American Association of Equine Practitioners searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 445 Serial 2414  
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Author (up) Falzon, L.C.; O'Neill, T.J.; Menzies, P.I.; Peregrine, A.S.; Jones-Bitton, A.; vanLeeuwen, J.; Mederos, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A systematic review and meta-analysis of factors associated with anthelmintic resistance in sheep Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Preventive Veterinary Medicine Abbreviated Journal Prev Vet Med  
  Volume 117 Issue 2 Pages 388-402  
  Keywords Sheep  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Anthelmintic drugs have been widely used in sheep as a cost-effective means for gastro-intestinal nematode (GIN) control. However, growing anthelmintic resistance (AHR) has created a compelling need to identify evidence-based management recommendations that reduce the risk of further development and impact of AHR. OBJECTIVE: To identify, critically assess, and synthesize available data from primary research on factors associated with AHR in sheep. METHODS: Publications reporting original observational or experimental research on selected factors associated with AHR in sheep GINs and published after 1974, were identified through two processes. Three electronic databases (PubMed, Agricola, CAB) and Web of Science (a collection of databases) were searched for potentially relevant publications. Additional publications were identified through consultation with experts, manual search of references of included publications and conference proceedings, and information solicited from small ruminant practitioner list-serves. Two independent investigators screened abstracts for relevance. Relevant publications were assessed for risk of systematic bias. Where sufficient data were available, random-effects Meta-Analyses (MAs) were performed to estimate the pooled Odds Ratio (OR) and 95% Confidence Intervals (CIs) of AHR for factors reported in >/=2 publications. RESULTS: Of the 1712 abstracts screened for eligibility, 131 were deemed relevant for full publication review. Thirty publications describing 25 individual studies (15 observational studies, 7 challenge trials, and 3 controlled trials) were included in the qualitative synthesis and assessed for systematic bias. Unclear (i.e. not reported, or unable to assess) or high risk of selection bias and confounding bias was found in 93% (14/15) and 60% (9/15) of the observational studies, respectively, while unclear risk of selection bias was identified in all of the trials. Ten independent studies were included in the quantitative synthesis, and MAs were performed for five factors. Only high frequency of treatment was a significant risk factor (OR=4.39; 95% CI=1.59, 12.14), while the remaining 4 variables were marginally significant: mixed-species grazing (OR=1.63; 95% CI=0.66, 4.07); flock size (OR=1.02; 95% CI=0.97, 1.07); use of long-acting drug formulations (OR=2.85; 95% CI=0.79, 10.24); and drench-and-shift pasture management (OR=4.08; 95% CI=0.75, 22.16). CONCLUSIONS: While there is abundant literature on the topic of AHR in sheep GINs, few studies have explicitly investigated the association between putative risk or protective factors and AHR. Consequently, several of the current recommendations on parasite management are not evidence-based. Moreover, many of the studies included in this review had a high or unclear risk of systematic bias, highlighting the need to improve study design and/or reporting of future research carried out in this field.  
  Address Veterinary Public Health Institute, Vetsuisse Faculty, University of Bern, Liebefeld, Bern, Switzerland. Electronic address: laura.falzon@vetsuisse.unibe.ch. Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. Department of Population Medicine, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada. Department of Pathobiology, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada. Centre for Veterinary Epidemiological Research, Department of Health Management, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, Canada. National Institute of Agricultural Research of Uruguay, Montevideo, Uruguay.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2014/07/26  
  ISSN 1873-1716 (Electronic) 0167-5877 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, Agricola (EBSCO Host), CAB Direct (CAB Abstracts) and Web of Science searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1241 Serial 2730  
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Author (up) Faria Filho, D.E.; Torres, K.A.A.; Faria, D.E.; Campos, D.M.B.; Rosa, P.S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Probiotics for broiler chickens in Brazil: systematic review and meta-analysis Type Journal Article
  Year 2006 Publication Brazilian Journal of Poultry Science Abbreviated Journal Braz J Poult Sci  
  Volume 8 Issue 2 Pages 89-98  
  Keywords Meat Producing Animals [LL120]; Animal Nutrition (General) [LL500]; Animal Nutrition (Production Responses) [LL520]; Feed Additives [RR130]; broiler performance; broilers; diets; feed additives; feed conversion; growth promoters; liveweight gain; poultry; probiotics; reviews; fowls; Brazil; Sao Paulo; Gallus gallus; Gallus; Phasianidae; Galliformes; birds; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; eukaryotes; South America; America; Developing Countries; Threshold Countries; Latin America; chickens; domesticated birds; efficacy; growth stimulants; liveweight gains; meta-analysis; [Indexed using CAB Thesaurus terms]  
  Abstract This study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of probiotic utilization as growth promoters in broiler chicken feeding using systematic literature review and meta-analysis. 35 studies were recovered by systematic review, 27 of which met the following criteria to be included in the meta-analysis: (1) Brazilian studies published between 1995 and 2005; (2) probiotics administered in the diet without growth promoter; and (3) results included performance data with the respective coefficient of variation. Meta-analysis revealed that the probiotics promoted better weight gain and feed conversion than the negative control (no antimicrobial) in the initial phase (1 to 20-28 days); nevertheless, results were similar to the whole duration of the study (1 to 35-48 days). Weight gain and feed conversion were similar between probiotics fed and the positive control (with antimicrobial) birds in the initial and whole experimental period. Sensitivity analysis showed that the results of meta-analysis were coherent. The funnel plots and the Egger regression method revealed that the studies published in Brazil do not present biased results. It is concluded that the probiotics are technically viable alternative to antimicrobial growth promoters in broiler feeding. Nevertheless, further studies are necessary to identify the differences among the commercially available probiotics in Brazil.  
  Address Animal Science – Faculdade de Ciencias Agrarias e Veterinarias, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Via de acesso Paulo Donato Castellane, km 5, 14.884-900. Jaboticabal, SP, Brazil. fariafilho@hotmail.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1516-635x ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes SciELO and CAB Abstracts searched. Database record copyright CAB International 2010 Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 320 Serial 2415  
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