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Author (up) Dhollander, S.; Belsham, G.J.; Lange, M.; Willgert, K.; Alexandrov, T.; Chondrokouki, E.; Depner, K.; Khomenko, S.; Ozyoruk, F.; Salman, M.; Thulke, H.H.; Botner, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Assessing the potential spread and maintenance of foot-and-mouth disease virus infection in wild ungulates: general principles and application to a specific scenario in Thrace Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Transboundary and Emerging Diseases Abbreviated Journal Transbound Emerg Dis  
  Volume Epublication ahead of print Issue Pages  
  Keywords Deer; Wild boar; Wild animals  
  Abstract Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), due to infection with serotype O virus, occurred in wild boar and within eleven outbreaks in domestic livestock in the south-east of Bulgaria, Thrace region, in 2011. Hence, the issue of the potential for the spread and maintenance of FMD virus (FMDV) infection in a population of wild ungulates became important. This assessment focused on the spread and maintenance of FMDV infection within a hypothetical wild boar and deer population in an environment, which is characterized by a climate transitional between Mediterranean and continental and variable wildlife population densities. The assessment was based on three aspects: (i) a systematic review of the literature focusing on experimental infection studies to identify the parameters describing the duration of FMDV infection in deer and wild boar, as well as observational studies assessing the occurrence of FMDV infection in wild deer and wild boar populations, (ii) prevalence survey data of wild boar and deer in Bulgaria and Turkey and (iii) an epidemiological model, simulating the host-to-host spread of FMDV infections. It is concluded, based on all three aspects, that the wildlife population in Thrace, and so wildlife populations in similar ecological settings, are probably not able to maintain FMD in the long term in the absence of FMDV infection in the domestic host population. However, limited spread of FMDV infection in time and space in the wildlife populations can occur. If there is a continued cross-over of FMDV between domestic and wildlife populations or a higher population density, virus circulation may be prolonged.  
  Address European Food Safety Authority, Parma, Italy.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2014/06/07  
  ISSN 1865-1682 (Electronic) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes CAB Abstracts, PubMed, Web of Science, HAL, Agricola, Agris (FAO), DEFRA, NAHIS, OIE, USDA-APHIS, DART-Europe E-theses Portal, Index to Theses in France (Fichier Central des Thèses), Index to Theses in Germany and Index to Theses in Great Britain and Ireland searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1236 Serial 2725  
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Author (up) Dias, R.S.; Lopez, S.; Montanholi, Y.R.; Smith, B.; Haas, L.S.; Miller, S.P.; France, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A meta-analysis of the effects of dietary copper, molybdenum, and sulfur on plasma and liver copper, weight gain, and feed conversion in growing-finishing cattle Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Journal of Animal Science Abbreviated Journal J Anim Sci  
  Volume 91 Issue 12 Pages 5714-5723  
  Keywords Cattle; Animal Feed/analysis; Animal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena; Animals; Body Composition/drug effects; Cattle/blood; Cattle/growth & development; Cattle/metabolism; Copper/blood; Copper/chemistry; Copper/pharmacology; Diet/veterinary; Liver/chemistry; Molybdenum/chemistry; Molybdenum/pharmacology; Sulfur/chemistry; Sulfur/pharmacology; Weight Gain/drug effects; Sulfur; Copper; Molybdenum  
  Abstract The minerals Cu, Mo, and S are essential for metabolic functions related to cattle health and performance. The interaction between Cu, Mo, and S can determine the utilization of each mineral, in particular Cu, by ruminants. A meta-analysis was performed to evaluate the effects of dietary Cu, Mo, and S and their interactions on plasma and liver Cu, ADG, and G:F in growing-finishing cattle. Data were collated from 12 published studies. The model with the best fit to data indicated plasma Cu was positively affected by dietary Cu (P < 0.01) and negatively affected by both dietary Mo (P < 0.01) and S (P < 0.01). Another model also indicated that plasma Cu concentration is positively related to Cu:Mo ratio in the diet (P < 0.01). Dietary Cu had a positive effect on liver Cu (P < 0.01), whereas Mo showed a negative effect (P < 0.05), and no effect of dietary S on liver Cu was observed (P > 0.05). Average daily gain was negatively affected by dietary Mo (P < 0.05) and S (P < 0.01) and positively affected by Cu:Mo ratio (P < 0.01), likely because an increased Cu:Mo ratio minimizes the antagonistic effect of Mo on Cu. The feed conversion ratio was negatively affected by Mo (P < 0.05) and S (P < 0.01), whereas effects of the Cu:Mo ratio and dietary Cu were not significant (P > 0.05). The interaction between S and Mo affected (P < 0.01) G:F, which was likely related to a positive response with the proper balance between these minerals. In conclusion, dietary Cu, Mo, and S and the Cu:Mo ratio caused changes in plasma Cu. Only dietary Mo and S led to a negative response in the performance of growing-finishing cattle, whereas the diet Cu:Mo ratio has a linear and quadratic effect on ADG. Nutritionists and producers need to consider with caution the supplementation of growing-finishing cattle diets with Mo and S because of their potentially adverse effects on animal performance. An appropriate Cu:Mo ratio is desirable to minimize the effects of an impaired supply of Mo on Cu metabolism and ADG.  
  Address Department of Animal and Poultry Science, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2013/11/23  
  ISSN 1525-3163 (Electronic) 0021-8812 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, Web of Science and Network Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1179 Serial 2675  
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Author (up) Diraviyam, T.; Zhao, B.; Wang, Y.; Schade, R.; Michael, A.; Zhang, X. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effect of chicken egg yolk antibodies (IgY) against diarrhea in domesticated animals: a systematic review and meta-analysis Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication PloS One Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 9 Issue 5 Pages e97716  
  Keywords Animal Diseases/drug therapy; Animals; Cattle; Chickens; Diarrhea/drug therapy; Diarrhea/veterinary; Immunoglobulins/therapeutic use; MEDLINE; Mice; IgY; Immunoglobulins; Pigs; Swine  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: IgY antibodies are serum immunoglobulin in birds, reptiles and amphibians, and are transferred from serum to egg yolk to confer passive immunity to their embryos and offspring. Currently, the oral passive immunization using chicken IgY has been focused as an alternative to antibiotics for the treatment and control of diarrhea in animals and humans. This systematic review was focused to determine the effect of IgY in controlling and preventing diarrhea in domesticated animals including Piglets, Mice, Poultry and Calves. METHODS AND RESULTS: Previous research reports focused on treatment effect of Chicken IgY against diarrhea were retrieved from different electronic data bases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, SPRINGER-LINK, WILEY, AGRICOLA, MEDWELL Journals, Scientific Publish, Chinese articles from Core periodicals in 2012). A total of 61 studies in 4 different animal classes met the inclusion criteria. Data on study characteristics and outcome measures were extracted. The pooled relative risk (RR) of 49 studies of different animals [Piglets – 22; Mice – 14; Poultry – 7 and Calves – 6] in meta-analyses revealed that, IgY significantly reduced the risk of diarrhea in treatment group when compare to the placebo. However, the 95% confidence intervals of the majority of studies in animal class piglets and calves embrace RR of one. The same results were obtained in sub group analyses (treatment regiment – prophylactic or therapeutic; pathogen type – bacterial or viral). Perhaps, this inconsistency in the effect of IgY at the individual study level and overall effect measures could be influenced by the methodological heterogeneity. CONCLUSION: The present systematic review (SR) and meta-analysis demonstrated the beneficial effect of IgY. This supports the opinion that IgY is useful for prophylaxis and treatment. However, more intensive studies using the gold standard animal experiments with the focus to use IgY alone or in combination with other alternative strategies are indispensable.  
  Address College of Veterinary Medicine, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi, China. College of Veterinary Medicine, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi, China; College of Science, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi, China. Institute of Pharmacology, Charite – Universitatsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany. PSG College of Arts and Science, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu, India.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2014/05/23  
  ISSN 1932-6203 (Electronic) 1932-6203 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes MEDLINE, Embase, SPRINGER-LINK, WILEY, AGRICOLA, MEDWELL Journals, Scientific Research Publish and Chinese articles from Core periodicals searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1223 Serial 2712  
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Author (up) Djabri, B.; Bareille, N.; Beaudeau, F.; Seegers, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Quarter milk somatic cell count in infected dairy cows: a meta-analysis Type Journal Article
  Year 2002 Publication Veterinary Research Abbreviated Journal Vet Res  
  Volume 33 Issue 4 Pages 335-357  
  Keywords Animals; Bacteriological Techniques/veterinary; Cattle; Cell Count/veterinary; Corynebacterium Infections/diagnosis/epidemiology/veterinary; Enterobacteriaceae Infections/diagnosis/epidemiology/veterinary; Female; Mammary Glands, Animal/microbiology/pathology; Mastitis, Bovine/diagnosis/epidemiology/microbiology; Milk/cytology/microbiology; Prevalence; Staphylococcal Infections/diagnosis/epidemiology/veterinary; Streptococcal Infections/diagnosis/epidemiology/veterinary  
  Abstract The aim of this paper was to evaluate the effects associated with intramammary infection (IMI) by a bacterium or a group of bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus dysgalactiae, Streptococcus uberis, coliforms, Staphylococci other than S. aureus, and Corynebacterium bovis) on the somatic cell count (SCC) in quarter milk of dairy cows. Papers selected for analysis had to provide SCC values associated with the natural infection in quarters by different bacteria. Sampling for measurement of SCC and determination of the infection had to be done on the same day. Only papers published in English or in French after 1971 were considered. Twenty-one papers fulfilled the selection criteria. The animals sampled, the measurement techniques for SCC and the bacteriological identification, as well as the definition of the infection, all differed widely among the selected studies. The meta-analysis method was used to estimate both the mean SCC (arithmetic and geometric) value and the average increase on SCC of each type of infection. The geometric mean SCC in bacteriologically negative quarters was 68 000 c/mL. In case of IMI, the retained SCC was 357 000, 857 000, 547 000, 1 024 000, 1 151 000, 138 000 and 105 000 c/mL in quarters infected by Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus dysgalactiae, Streptococcus uberis, coliforms, staphylococci other than S. aureus and Corynebacterium bovis, respectively. The variation factors that could influence these SCC values and the bacteriological results are discussed.  
  Address Unit of Animal Health Management, Veterinary School, INRA, Nantes, France. djabri@vet-nantes.fr  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2002/08/30  
  ISSN 0928-4249 (Print) 0928-4249 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes MEDLINE and CAB searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 646 Serial 2390  
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Author (up) Dodd, C.C.; Sanderson, M.W.; Jacob, M.E.; Renter, D.G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Modeling preharvest and harvest interventions for Escherichia coli O157 contamination of beef cattle carcasses Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Journal of Food Protection Abbreviated Journal J Food Prot  
  Volume 74 Issue 9 Pages 1422-1433  
  Keywords Animal Husbandry/methods; Animals; Cattle/microbiology; Colony Count, Microbial; Escherichia coli O157/growth & development; Feces/microbiology; Food Contamination/analysis/prevention & control; Food Microbiology; Humans; Models, Biological; Monte Carlo Method; Prevalence; Risk Assessment; Risk Factors; Seasons; Skin/microbiology; Stochastic Processes; Transportation; Cattle  
  Abstract Field studies evaluating the effects of multiple concurrent preharvest interventions for Escherichia coli O157 are logistically and economically challenging; however, modeling techniques may provide useful information on these effects while also identifying crucial information gaps that can guide future research. We constructed a risk assessment model with data obtained from a systematic search of scientific literature. Parameter distributions were incorporated into a stochastic Monte Carlo modeling framework to examine the impacts of different combinations of preharvest and harvest interventions for E. coli O157 on the risk of beef carcass contamination. We estimated the risk of E. coli O157 carcass contamination conditional on preharvest fecal prevalence estimates, inclusion of feed additive(s) in the diet, vaccination for E. coli O157, transport and lairage effects, hide intervention(s), and carcass intervention(s). Prevalence parameters for E. coli O157 were assumed to encompass potential effects of concentration; therefore, concentration effects were not specifically evaluated in this study. Sensitivity analyses revealed that fecal prevalence, fecal-to-hide transfer, hide-to-carcass transfer, and carcass intervention efficacy significantly affected the risk of carcass contamination (correlation coefficients of 0.37, 0.56, 0.58, and -0.29, respectively). The results indicated that combinations of preharvest interventions may be particularly important for supplementing harvest interventions during periods of higher variability in fecal shedding prevalence (i.e., summer). Further assessments of the relationships among fecal prevalence and concentration, hide contamination, and subsequent carcass contamination are needed to further define risks and intervention impacts for E. coli O157 contamination of beef.  
  Address Department of Diagnostic Medicine and Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas 66506-5006, USA.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2011/09/10  
  ISSN 1944-9097 (Electronic) 0362-028X (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed and AGRICOLA searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 442 Serial 2391  
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Author (up) Dohoo, I.R.; DesCoteaux, L.; Leslie, K.; Fredeen, A.; Shewfelt, W.; Preston, A.; Dowling, P. url  openurl
  Title A meta-analysis review of the effects of recombinant bovine somatotropin. 2. Effects on animal health, reproductive performance, and culling Type Journal Article
  Year 2003 Publication Canadian Journal of Veterinary Research Abbreviated Journal Can J Vet Res  
  Volume 67 Issue 4 Pages 252-264  
  Keywords Animals; Cattle/physiology; Female; Growth Hormone/pharmacology; Ketosis/prevention & control/veterinary; Lameness, Animal/epidemiology; Mastitis, Bovine/epidemiology; Parity; Prevalence; Reproduction/drug effects; Risk Factors; Cattle  
  Abstract This manuscript presents the results of a review of the effects of recombinant bovine somatotropin (rBST) on dairy cattle health, reproductive performance, and culling, that was carried out by an expert panel established by the Canadian Veterinary Medical Association (CVMA). The panel was established by the CVMA in response to a request from Health Canada in 1998 and their report was made public in 1999. A series of meta-analyses was used to combine data on health-related parameters that were extracted from all randomized clinical trials that had been published in peer-reviewed journals or which were provided by Health Canada from the submission by Monsanto for registration of rBST in Canada. A companion paper (1) presents the estimates of the effect of the drug on production parameters. Recombinant bovine somatotropin was found to increase the risk of clinical mastitis by approximately 25% during the treatment period but there was insufficient data to draw firm conclusions about the effects of the drug on the prevalence of subclinical intra-mammary infections. Use of rBST increased the risk of a cow failing to conceive by approximately 40%. For cows which did conceive, there was no effect on services per conception and only a small increase in average days open (5 days). Use of the drug had no effect on gestation length, but the information about a possible effect on the risk of twinning was equivocal. Cows treated with rBST had an estimated 55% increase in the risk of developing clinical signs of lameness. Few studies reported data on culling, but based on those that did, there appeared to be an increase risk of culling evident in multiparous cows. Use of the drug in 1 lactation period appeared to reduce the risk of metabolic diseases (particularly ketosis) in the early period of the subsequent lactation.  
  Address Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island C1A 4P3. dohoo@upei.ca  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2003/11/19  
  ISSN 0830-9000 (Print) 0830-9000 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes MEDLINE, AGRICOLA and CAB searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 648 Serial 2392  
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Author (up) Dohoo, I.R.; Leslie, K.; DesCoteaux, L.; Fredeen, A.; Dowling, P.; Preston, A.; Shewfelt, W. url  openurl
  Title A meta-analysis review of the effects of recombinant bovine somatotropin. 1. Methodology and effects on production Type Journal Article
  Year 2003 Publication Canadian Journal of Veterinary Research Abbreviated Journal Can J Vet Res  
  Volume 67 Issue 4 Pages 241-251  
  Keywords Animals; Body Composition/drug effects; Body Constitution; Canada; Cattle/physiology; Eating/drug effects; Female; Growth Hormone/pharmacology; Milk/chemistry/drug effects/secretion; Parity; Cattle  
  Abstract This manuscript presents the results of a review of the effects of recombinant bovine somatotropin (rBST) on milk production, milk composition, dry matter intake, and body condition score that was carried out by an expert panel established by the Canadian Veterinary Medical Association (CVMA). The panel was established by the CVMA in response to a request from Health Canada in 1998 and their report was made public in 1999. A series of meta-analyses was used to combine data on production and nutrition related parameters that were extracted from all randomized clinical trials, which had been published in peer-reviewed journals or which were provided by Health Canada, from the submission by Monsanto for registration of rBST in Canada. A companion paper will present the results of the effects of the drug on measures of health, reproductive performance, and culling parameters. Recombinant bovine somatotropin was found to increase milk production by 11.3% in primiparous cows and 15.6% in multiparous cows; although there was considerable variation from study to study. While some statistically significant effects on milk composition (% butterfat, protein, and lactose) were found, they were all very small. Treatment increased dry matter intake by an average 1.5 kg/day during the treatment period and dry matter intake remained elevated on into the first 60 days of the subsequent lactation. Despite the increase in dry matter intake, treated animals had lower body condition scores at the end of the treatment period, and the reduced scores persisted through until the start of the subsequent lactation.  
  Address Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island C1A 4P3. dohoo@upei.ca  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2003/11/19  
  ISSN 0830-9000 (Print) 0830-9000 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes MEDLINE, AGRICOLA, Index Veterinarius and CAB Veterinary Bulletin searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 649 Serial 2393  
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Author (up) Dominguez, M.; Munstermann, S.; de Guindos, I.; Timoney, P. doi  openurl
  Title Equine disease events resulting from international horse movements: systematic review and lessons learned Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Equine Veterinary Journal Abbreviated Journal Equine Vet J  
  Volume Epublication ahead of print Issue Pages  
  Keywords Horses; Equine; International movement; Disease outbreaks  
  Abstract REASONS FOR PERFORMING THE STUDY: An analysis of the factors leading to equine disease events was used to support the development of international recommendations for mitigating the risk of disease dissemination through sport horse movements (high health, high performance -“HHP” horses). OBJECTIVES: A systematic review was undertaken to identify the factors resulting in equine disease events following international movement of horses to draw lessons in support of the development of international recommendations for the safe movements of a specific subpopulation of horses: the HHP sport horses. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: The review covered disease events that occurred from 1995 to 2014, identified from the databases of the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) and international surveillance reports. RESULTS: Overall, 54 disease events were identified, of which 7 were contained in post-arrival quarantine and the others resulted in the introduction of pathogens into importing countries. For 81% of the introductions, the OIE recommendations applicable to the diseases involved had not been complied with. Subclinical infections are a challenge for international trade: 88% of the regulated movements that resulted in introductions involved infected horses that showed no clinical signs at the time of import. Biosecurity and management practices in resident equine populations were identified as important mitigating factors in preventing disease spread to the local horse population. CONCLUSIONS: The global increase in international horse movements, if not appropriately regulated and supervised by competent Veterinary Authorities and respective equine industry partners, could potentially lead to increased global spread of infectious equine diseases. Appropriate mitigation measures and compliance with OIE import recommendations for specific diseases can significantly reduce this risk. The recommendations proposed under the HHP approach take into account the mitigation measures identified by this review as important factors in preventing pathogen introduction and spread. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.  
  Address World Organisation for Animal Health O.I.E, 12 Rue de Prony, 75017, Paris, France. Veterinary Faculty, University of Complutense, Madrid, Spain. Maxwell H. Gluck Equine Research Center, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, USA.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2015/10/29  
  ISSN 2042-3306 (Electronic) 0425-1644 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) databses and international surveillance reports searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1377 Serial 2844  
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Author (up) Dore, E.; Pare, J.; Cote, G.; Buczinski, S.; Labrecque, O.; Roy, J.P.; Fecteau, G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Risk factors associated with transmission of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis to calves within dairy herd: a systematic review Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine / American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Vet Intern Med  
  Volume 26 Issue 1 Pages 32-45  
  Keywords Animals; Animals, Newborn; Cattle; Cattle Diseases/microbiology/transmission; Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis/isolation & purification; Paratuberculosis/microbiology/transmission; Risk Factors  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Paratuberculosis has a worldwide distribution and many countries have implemented control programs to prevent transmission among and within herds. For these programs to be efficient, knowledge of the risk factors involved in transmission is essential. OBJECTIVES: Systematically review the scientific literature concerning risk factors associated with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) transmission to dairy calves. STUDY DESIGN: Systematic review. METHODS: An electronic search was done in PubMed and CAB to retrieve references relevant to answer at least 1 of the 5 questions concerning neonatal environment, colostrum, milk, housing of calves, and contact of calves with adult cow feces as risk factors in MAP transmission. A 1st screening was done using titles only, then abstracts, and finally full-length articles were reviewed for relevance. From the articles selected, risk factors and presence of a significant association between these risk factors and MAP transmission were recorded. RESULTS: Twenty-three articles from 11 different countries and published in 12 different journals were reviewed. The most common study design was cross-sectional (n = 16). The case definition and diagnostic tests used were very variable among studies, but serum ELISA was used in most studies (n = 14). The study unit was the herd in 18 studies. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL IMPORTANCE: The contact of calves with adult cow feces is the most important risk factor in MAP transmission. The 5 categories of risk factors are linked to one another.  
  Address Faculte de Medecine Veterinaire, Universite de Montreal, Saint-Hyacinthe, QC, Canada. elizabeth.dore@umontreal.ca  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2012/01/04  
  ISSN 1939-1676 (Electronic) 0891-6640 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed and CAB (Abstracts?) searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 839 Serial 2394  
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Author (up) Dorea, F.C.; Sanchez, J.; Revie, C.W. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Veterinary syndromic surveillance: Current initiatives and potential for development Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Preventive Veterinary Medicine Abbreviated Journal Prev Vet Med  
  Volume 101 Issue 1-2 Pages 1-17  
  Keywords Animals; Bioterrorism/prevention & control; Communicable Diseases, Emerging/epidemiology/veterinary; Data Collection/methods; Databases, Factual; Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control/veterinary; Humans; Public Health Practice; Sentinel Surveillance/veterinary  
  Abstract This paper reviews recent progress in the development of syndromic surveillance systems for veterinary medicine. Peer-reviewed and grey literature were searched in order to identify surveillance systems that explicitly address outbreak detection based on systematic monitoring of animal population data, in any phase of implementation. The review found that developments in veterinary syndromic surveillance are focused not only on animal health, but also on the use of animals as sentinels for public health, representing a further step towards One Medicine. The main sources of information are clinical data from practitioners and laboratory data, but a number of other sources are being explored. Due to limitations inherent in the way data on animal health is collected, the development of veterinary syndromic surveillance initially focused on animal health data collection strategies, analyzing historical data for their potential to support systematic monitoring, or solving problems of data classification and integration. Systems based on passive notification or data transfers are now dealing with sustainability issues. Given the ongoing barriers in availability of data, diagnostic laboratories appear to provide the most readily available data sources for syndromic surveillance in animal health. As the bottlenecks around data source availability are overcome, the next challenge is consolidating data standards for data classification, promoting the integration of different animal health surveillance systems, and also the integration to public health surveillance. Moreover, the outputs of systems for systematic monitoring of animal health data must be directly connected to real-time decision support systems which are increasingly being used for disease management and control.  
  Address Department of Health Management, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, 550 University Avenue, Charlottetown, PE, C1A 4P3, Canada. fdorea@upei.ca  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2011/06/07  
  ISSN 1873-1716 (Electronic) 0167-5877 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed and CAB Abstracts searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1101 Serial 2395  
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Author (up) Dorea, J.R.R.; Danes, M.A.C.; Zanton, G.I.; Armentano, L.E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Urinary purine derivatives as a tool to estimate dry matter intake in cattle: A meta-analysis Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Dairy Science Abbreviated Journal J Dairy Sci  
  Volume 100 Issue 11 Pages 8977-8994  
  Keywords Cattle; Beef; Dairy; DMI; Nutirition  
  Abstract The objectives of this study were to investigate the relationship between dry matter intake (DMI) and urinary purine derivative (PD) excretion, to develop equations to predict DMI and to determine the endogenous excretion of PD for beef and dairy cattle using a meta-analytical approach. To develop the models, 62 published studies for both dairy (45 studies) and beef cattle (17 studies) were compiled. Twenty models were tested using DMI (kg/d) and digestible DMI (dDMI, kg/d) as response variables and PD:creatinine (linear term: PD:C, and quadratic term: PD:C2), allantoin:creatinine (linear term: ALLA:C, and quadratic term: ALLA:C2), metabolic body weight (BW0.75, kg), milk yield (MY, kg/d), and their combination as explanatory variables for dairy and beef (except for MY) cattle. The models developed to predict DMI for dairy cattle were validated using an independent data set from 2 research trials carried out at the University of Wisconsin (trial 1: n = 45; trial 2: n = 50). A second set of models was developed to estimate the endogenous PD excretion. In all evaluated models, the effect of PD (either as PD:C or ALLA:C) was significant, supporting our hypothesis that PD are in fact correlated with DMI. Despite the BW-independent relationship between PD and DMI, the inclusion of BW0.75 in the models with PD:C and ALLA:C as predictors slightly decreased the values of root mean square error (RMSE) and Akaike information criterion for the models of DMI. Our models suggest that both DMI and dDMI can be equally well predicted by PD-related variables; however, predicting DMI seems more useful from a practical and experimental standpoint. The inclusion of MY into the dairy models substantially decreased RMSE and Akaike information criterion values, and further increased the precision of the equations. The model including PD:C, BW0.75, and MY presented greater concordance correlation coefficient (0.93 and 0.63 for trials 1 and 2, respectively) and lower RMSE of prediction (1.90 and 3.35 kg/d for trials 1 and 2, respectively) when tested in the validation data set, emerging as a potentially useful estimator of nutrient intake in dairy cows. Endogenous PD excretion was estimated by the intercept of the linear regression between DMI (g/kg of BW0.75) and PD excretion (mmol/kg of BW0.75) for beef (0.404 mmol/kg of BW0.75) and dairy cattle (0.651 mmol/kg of BW0.75). Based on the very close agreement between our results for beef cattle and the literature, the linear regression appears to be an adequate method to estimate endogenous PD excretion.  
  Address Department of Dairy Science, University of Wisconsin, Madison 53706. Department of Animal Science, University of Lavras, Lavras, Minas Gerais, 37200-000, Brazil. US Dairy Forage Research Center, 1925 Linden Drive West, Madison, WI 53706. Department of Dairy Science, University of Wisconsin, Madison 53706. Electronic address: learment@wisc.edu.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2017/09/04  
  ISSN 1525-3198 (Electronic) 0022-0302 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Web of Science, Scielo, and Scopus searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1464 Serial 2919  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Dorey, N.R.; Udell, M.A.; Wynne, C.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Breed differences in dogs sensitivity to human points: a meta-analysis Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication Behavioural Processes Abbreviated Journal Behav Processes  
  Volume 81 Issue 3 Pages 409-415  
  Keywords Analysis of Variance; Animals; Arm; Binomial Distribution; Communication; Dogs/genetics/psychology; Food; Gestures; Humans; Probability; Species Specificity; Dogs  
  Abstract The last decade has seen a substantial increase in research on the behavioral and cognitive abilities of pet dogs, Canis familiaris. The most commonly used experimental paradigm is the object-choice task in which a dog is given a choice of two containers and guided to the reinforced object by human pointing gestures. We review here studies of this type and attempt a meta-analysis of the available data. In the meta-analysis breeds of dogs were grouped into the eight categories of the American Kennel Club, and into four clusters identified by Parker and Ostrander [Parker, H.G., Ostrander, E.A., 2005. Canine genomics and genetics: running with the pack. PLoS Genet. 1, 507-513] on the basis of a genetic analysis. No differences in performance between breeds categorized in either fashion were identified. Rather, all dog breeds appear to be similarly and highly successful in following human points to locate desired food. We suggest this result could be due to the paucity of data available in published studies, and the restricted range of breeds tested.  
  Address University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2009/06/13  
  ISSN 1872-8308 (Electronic) 0376-6357 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Web of Knowledge (Web of Science?), PsycINFO and MEDLINE searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 652 Serial 2396  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Douglas, S.L.; Szyszka, O.; Stoddart, K.; Edwards, S.A.; Kyriazakis, I. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A meta-analysis to identify animal and management factors influencing gestating sow efficiency Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Journal of Animal Science Abbreviated Journal J Anim Sci  
  Volume 92 Issue 12 Pages 5716-26  
  Keywords Pigs; Swine; Sows; Reproduction  
  Abstract A meta-analysis on the effects of management and animal-based factors on the reproductive efficiency of gestating sows can provide information on single-factor and interaction effects that may not have been detected in individual studies. This study analyzed the effects of such factors on the number of piglets born alive per litter (BA), piglet birth weight (BiW) and weaning weight (WW), and number of piglets born alive per kilogram of sow feed intake during gestation (BA/FI). A total of 51 papers and 7 data sources were identified for the meta-analysis, out of which 23 papers and 5 sets of production data were useable (a total of 121 treatments). The information gathered included the dependent variables as well as information regarding animal, management, and feed characteristics. While a number of factors were individually significant, the multivariate models identified significant effects only of 1) floor type (P = 0.003), sow BW at the end of gestation (P = 0.002), and housing (stalls vs. loose; P = 0.004) on BA; as floor type and housing were confounded, they were included in 2 separate models. The BA was higher on solid (12.1) in comparison to partly slatted (11.4) and fully slatted floors (10.2); 2) sow gestation environment (P = 0.017) and gestation feed allowance (P = 0.046) on BiW, with BiW of pigs higher for sows kept outdoors rather than indoors (1.75 versus 1.49 kg); 3) parity number (P = 0.003) and feed intake during gestation (P = 0.017) on WW; in addition there was an interaction between parity number x feed ME and parity number x feed CP content of feed during gestation on WW, with the positive effects of feed ME and CP contents seen during early rather than later parities; and 4) floor type (P = 0.019) and feed crude fiber (P = 0.003) for BA/FI with a greater number for those kept on solid floors (5.11) versus partially and fully slatted floors (4.07 and 4.05). The meta-analysis confirmed the significant effect of several well-known factors on the efficiency of gestating sows and, importantly, the interactions between these factors. In addition, the effects of some less established factors were noted, such as floor type. The results may contribute towards the improvement of efficiency of gestating sow systems by better understanding of the various factors that influence this.  
  Address School of Agriculture Food and Rural Development, Newcastle University, Newcastle on Tyne, NE1 7RU, UK. BPEX, Stoneleigh Park, Kenilworth, Warwickshire, CV8 2TL. School of Agriculture Food and Rural Development, Newcastle University, Newcastle on Tyne, NE1 7RU, UK ilias.kyriazakis@newcastle.ac.uk.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2014/11/05  
  ISSN 1525-3163 (Electronic) 0021-8812 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Scopus searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1280 Serial 2767  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Downes, M.J.; Dean, R.S.; Stavisky, J.H.; Adams, V.J.; Grindlay, D.J.; Brennan, M.L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Methods used to estimate the size of the owned cat and dog population: a systematic review Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication BMC Veterinary Research Abbreviated Journal BMC Vet Res  
  Volume 9 Issue Pages 121  
  Keywords Animals; Bias (Epidemiology); Cats; Dogs; Epidemiologic Methods/veterinary; Humans; Ownership/statistics & numerical data; Pets  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: There are a number of different methods that can be used when estimating the size of the owned cat and dog population in a region, leading to varying population estimates. The aim of this study was to conduct a systematic review to evaluate the methods that have been used for estimating the sizes of owned cat and dog populations and to assess the biases associated with those methods.A comprehensive, systematic search of seven electronic bibliographic databases and the Google search engine was carried out using a range of different search terms for cats, dogs and population. The inclusion criteria were that the studies had involved owned or pet domestic dogs and/or cats, provided an estimate of the size of the owned dog or cat population, collected raw data on dog and cat ownership, and analysed primary data. Data relating to study methodology were extracted and assessed for biases. RESULTS: Seven papers were included in the final analysis. Collection methods used to select participants in the included studies were: mailed surveys using a commercial list of contacts, door to door surveys, random digit dialled telephone surveys, and randomised telephone surveys using a commercial list of numbers. Analytical and statistical methods used to estimate the pet population size were: mean number of dogs/cats per household multiplied by the number of households in an area, human density multiplied by number of dogs per human, and calculations using predictors of pet ownership. CONCLUSION: The main biases of the studies included selection bias, non-response bias, measurement bias and biases associated with length of sampling time. Careful design and planning of studies is a necessity before executing a study to estimate pet populations.  
  Address Centre for Evidence-based Veterinary Medicine, School of Veterinary Medicine and Science, The University of Nottingham, Sutton Bonington Campus, LE12 5RD, Loughborough, UK. martin.downes@nottingham.ac.uk.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2013/06/20  
  ISSN 1746-6148 (Electronic) 1746-6148 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes CAB Abstracts, Web of Science, MEDLINE, Embase, PubMed, BIOSIS Previews, Zoological Record and Google searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1112 Serial 2397  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Downs, S.H.; Parry, J.; Nunez-Garcia, J.; Abernethy, D.A.; Broughan, J.M.; Cameron, A.R.; Cook, A.J.; Rua-Domenech, R. de la; Goodchild, A.V.; Greiner, M.; Gunn, J.; More, S.J.; Rhodes, S.; Rolfe, S.; Sharp, M.; Upton, P.; Vordermeier, H.M.; Watson, E.; Welsh, M.; Whelan, A.O.; Woolliams, J.A.; Clifton-Hadley, R.S. isbn  openurl
  Title Meta-analysis of diagnostic test performance and modelling of testing strategies for control of bovine tuberculosis in GB Type Book Chapter
  Year 2011 Publication Proceedings of the Society for Veterinary Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Leipzig, Germany, 23 Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 139-153  
  Keywords Dairy Animals [LL110]; Prion, Viral, Bacterial and Fungal Pathogens of Animals [LL821]; Diagnosis of Animal Diseases [LL886]; Mathematics and Statistics [ZZ100]; control programmes; cows; dairy cattle; dairy cows; dairy herds; diagnosis; diagnostic techniques; disease control; disease prevalence; disease prevention; disease transmission; epidemiology; estimates; mathematical models; meta-analysis; monitoring; probability; risk; statistical analysis; tuberculosis; cattle; Mycobacterium bovis; UK; Bos; Bovidae; ruminants; Artiodactyla; mammals; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; ungulates; eukaryotes; Mycobacterium; Mycobacteriaceae; Corynebacterineae; Actinomycetales; Actinobacteridae; Actinobacteria; Bacteria; prokaryotes; British Isles; Western Europe; Europe; Commonwealth of Nations; Developed Countries; European Union Countries; OECD Countries; cattle; [Indexed using CAB Thesaurus terms]  
  Abstract The British Government spends over <pounds>100 million per annum on the control of bovine tuberculosis (bTB). Improvement in the control through targeted use of diagnostic tests is one focus of eradication plans. The aims were: (a) through systematic literature review identify primary research with estimates of sensitivity (Se) and specificity (Sp) for diagnostic tests for bTB in cattle (b) conduct a statistical meta-analysis to estimate test performance, and (c) using the estimates, model and compare different testing strategies. Of 9782 references reviewed, only 261 met agreed criteria and contained performance estimates for one or more of 14 diagnostic tests. The performance of bTB surveillance systems using the estimates of test performance was affected by the historical probability of herd freedom and the risk of introduction of infection. Where the probability of introduction of infection was high, it was difficult to achieve a high target probability of herd freedom from infection.  
  Address Veterinary Laboratories Agency-Weybridge, New Haw, Addlestone, Surrey, KT15 3NB, UK. s.downs@vla.defra.gsi.gov.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Society for Veterinary Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine Place of Publication Roslin Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title Proceedings of the Society for Veterinary Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Leipzig, Germany, 23  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN 978-0-948073-99-1 Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Web of Science, Current Contents, CAB Abstracts, MEDLINE, Embase, AGRICOLA and AGRIS searched. Database record copyright CAB International 2010 Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 310 Serial 2398  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Drewe, J.A.; Hoinville, L.J.; Cook, A.J.; Floyd, T.; Stark, K.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evaluation of animal and public health surveillance systems: a systematic review Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Epidemiology and Infection Abbreviated Journal Epidemiol Infect  
  Volume 140 Issue 4 Pages 575-590  
  Keywords Animals; Communicable Diseases/epidemiology/veterinary; Cost-Benefit Analysis; Evaluation Studies as Topic; Humans; Population Surveillance; Quality Indicators, Health Care  
  Abstract Disease surveillance programmes ought to be evaluated regularly to ensure they provide valuable information in an efficient manner. Evaluation of human and animal health surveillance programmes around the world is currently not standardized and therefore inconsistent. The aim of this systematic review was to review surveillance system attributes and the methods used for their assessment, together with the strengths and weaknesses of existing frameworks for evaluating surveillance in animal health, public health and allied disciplines. Information from 99 articles describing the evaluation of 101 surveillance systems was examined. A wide range of approaches for assessing 23 different system attributes was identified although most evaluations addressed only one or two attributes and comprehensive evaluations were uncommon. Surveillance objectives were often not stated in the articles reviewed and so the reasons for choosing certain attributes for assessment were not always apparent. This has the potential to introduce misleading results in surveillance evaluation. Due to the wide range of system attributes that may be assessed, methods should be explored which collapse these down into a small number of grouped characteristics by focusing on the relationships between attributes and their links to the objectives of the surveillance system and the evaluation. A generic and comprehensive evaluation framework could then be developed consisting of a limited number of common attributes together with several sets of secondary attributes which could be selected depending on the disease or range of diseases under surveillance and the purpose of the surveillance. Economic evaluation should be an integral part of the surveillance evaluation process. This would provide a significant benefit to decision-makers who often need to make choices based on limited or diminishing resources.  
  Address Centre for Emerging, Endemic and Exotic Diseases, Royal Veterinary College, University of London, UK. jdrewe@rvc.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2011/11/15  
  ISSN 1469-4409 (Electronic) 0950-2688 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Web of Science and Google searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 653 Serial 2399  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Ducrotoy, M.J.; Munoz, P.M.; Conde-Alvarez, R.; Blasco, J.M.; Moriyon, I. doi  openurl
  Title A systematic review of current immunological tests for the diagnosis of cattle brucellosis Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Preventative Veterinary Medicine Abbreviated Journal Prev Vet Med  
  Volume 151 Issue Pages 57-72  
  Keywords Brucellosis; Cattle; Diagnosis; Vaccination; Immunology  
  Abstract Brucellosis is a worldwide extended zoonosis with a heavy economic and public health impact. Cattle, sheep and goats are infected by smooth Brucella abortus and Brucella melitensis, and represent a common source of the human disease. Brucellosis diagnosis in these animals is largely based on detection of a specific immunoresponse. We review here the immunological tests used for the diagnosis of cattle brucellosis. First, we discuss how the diagnostic sensitivity (DSe) and specificity (DSp), balance should be adjusted for brucellosis diagnosis, and the difficulties that brucellosis tests specifically present for the estimation of DSe/DSp in frequentistic (gold standard) and Bayesian analyses. Then, we present a systematic review (PubMed, GoogleScholar and CABdirect) of works (154 out of 991; years 1960-August 2017) identified (by title and Abstract content) as DSe and DSp studies of smooth lipopolysaccharide, O-polysaccharide-core, native hapten and protein diagnostic tests. We summarize data of gold standard studies (n=23) complying with strict inclusion and exclusion criteria with regards to test methodology and definition of the animals studied (infected and S19 or RB51 vaccinated cattle, and Brucella-free cattle affected or not by false positive serological reactions). We also discuss some studies (smooth lipopolysaccharide tests, protein antibody and delayed type hypersensitivity [skin] tests) that do not meet the criteria and yet fill some of the gaps in information. We review Bayesian studies (n=5) and report that in most cases priors and assumptions on conditional dependence/independence are not coherent with the variable serological picture of the disease in different epidemiological scenarios and the bases (antigen, isotype and immunoglobulin properties involved) of brucellosis tests, practical experience and the results of gold standard studies. We conclude that very useful lipopolysaccharide (buffered plate antigen and indirect ELISA) and native hapten polysaccharide and soluble protein tests exist, provided they are applied taking into account the means available and the epidemiological contexts of this disease: i) mass vaccination; ii) elimination based on vaccination combined with test-and-slaughter; and iii) surveillance and existence of false positive serological reactions. We also conclude that the insistence in recent literature on the lack of usefulness of all smooth lipopolysaccharide or native hapten polysaccharide tests in areas where S19 vaccination is implemented is a misinterpretation that overlooks scientific and practical evidence.  
  Address Division of Infection and Pathway Medicine, School of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine & Veterinary Medicine The University of Edinburgh, Chancellor's Building, 49 Little France Crescent, Edinburgh, EH16 4SB, UK. Electronic address: marie.ducrotoy@gmail.com. Unidad de Tecnologia en Produccion y Sanidad Animal, IA2 CITA/Universidad de Zaragoza, Avenida de Montanana 930, 50059, Zaragoza, Spain. Electronic address: pmmunnoz@cita-aragon.es. Instituto de Salud Tropical (ISTUN), Instituto de Investigacion Sanitaria de Navarra (IdISNA) y Depto. Microbiologia y Parasitologia, Universidad de Navarra, Edificio de Investigacion, c/Irunlarrea 1, 31008, Pamplona, Spain. Electronic address: rconde@unav.es. Unidad de Tecnologia en Produccion y Sanidad Animal, IA2 CITA/Universidad de Zaragoza, Avenida de Montanana 930, 50059, Zaragoza, Spain. Electronic address: jblasco@unizar.es. Instituto de Salud Tropical (ISTUN), Instituto de Investigacion Sanitaria de Navarra (IdISNA) y Depto. Microbiologia y Parasitologia, Universidad de Navarra, Edificio de Investigacion, c/Irunlarrea 1, 31008, Pamplona, Spain. Electronic address: imoriyon@unav.es.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2018/03/03  
  ISSN 1873-1716 (Electronic) 0167-5877 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, GoogleScholar and CABdirect searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1671 Serial 2926  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Duffield, T.F.; Merrill, J.K.; Bagg, R.N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Meta-analysis of the effects of monensin in beef cattle on feed efficiency, body weight gain, and dry matter intake Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Journal of Animal Science Abbreviated Journal J Anim Sci  
  Volume 90 Issue 12 Pages 4583-4592  
  Keywords Animal Feed/analysis; Animals; Cattle/physiology; Diet/veterinary; Feeding Behavior/drug effects; Monensin/pharmacology; Proton Ionophores/pharmacology; Time Factors; Weight Gain/drug effects; Cattle  
  Abstract A meta-analysis of the impact of monensin on growing and finishing beef cattle was conducted after a search of the literature. A total of 40 peer-reviewed articles and 24 additional trial reports with monensin feeding in beef cattle were selected, after meeting apriori quality criteria. Data for each trial were extracted and analyzed using meta-analysis software in STATA. Estimated effect size of monensin was calculated for feed efficiency (FE), ADG, and DMI. Monensin use in growing and finishing beef cattle reduced DMI (P < 0.001) and improved both ADG (P < 0.001) and FE (P < 0.001). The average concentration of monensin in feed across studies was 28.1 mg/kg feed (100% DM) and this resulted in approximately a 6.4% (but only 2.5 to 3.5% in the last 2 decades) increase in FE, 3% decrease in DMI, and 2.5% increase in ADG. All 3 outcomes displayed moderate and significant heterogeneity of monensin response (I(2), which is a measure of variation beyond chance, = 29% for FE, 42% for DMI, and 23% for ADG); therefore, random effects models were used for those outcomes. There were no single influential studies that overweighted the findings for any outcome. Meta-regression analysis of the effect sizes obtained from these data showed that dietary factors, dose, and study design were influential in modifying effect size of monensin treatment. Use of corn silage in the diet influenced the effect size of monensin for DMI and FE, with diets containing corn silage resulting in a greater improvement in FE and a larger effect on reducing DMI. Studies conducted to assess multiple doses of monensin showed similar effects to the use of corn silage in the diet. Studies conducted in the United States or with higher ADG in control animals (>1.17 kg/d) showed less effect of monensin on ADG. Pen-level studies showed a greater monensin increase on ADG than did those conducted on individual animals. Linear effect of monensin dose was observed for FE, DMI, and ADG outcomes, with greater effects on improving FE and reducing DMI with larger doses of monensin but lesser improvement in ADG with increasing dose. These findings confirm that monensin improves FE in growing and finishing beef cattle, and that this effect is linear with dose.  
  Address Department of Population Medicine, University of Guelph, ON, Canada N1G 2W1. tduffiel@ovc.uoguelph.ca  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2012/08/04  
  ISSN 1525-3163 (Electronic) 0021-8812 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, AGRICOLA, CAB (Abstracts?) and Google Scholar searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1120 Serial 2400  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Duffield, T.F.; Rabiee, A.R.; Lean, I.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A meta-analysis of the impact of monensin in lactating dairy cattle. Part 3. Health and reproduction Type Journal Article
  Year 2008 Publication Journal of Dairy Science Abbreviated Journal J Dairy Sci  
  Volume 91 Issue 6 Pages 2328-2341  
  Keywords Animal Welfare; Animals; Cattle/physiology; Cattle Diseases/prevention & control; Female; Health Status; Ionophores/adverse effects/pharmacology; Lactation/drug effects/physiology; Monensin/adverse effects/pharmacology; Reproduction/drug effects/physiology; Cattle  
  Abstract A meta-analysis of the impact of monensin on health and reproductive outcomes in dairy cattle was conducted. A total of 16 papers were identified with sufficient data and quality to evaluate health and reproductive outcomes for monensin. The available trials provided approximately 9,500 cows with sufficient data for analysis. This provided good statistical power to examine the effects of monensin on health and reproduction. Over all the trials analyzed, monensin decreased the risk of ketosis [relative risk (RR) = 0.75], displaced abomasums (RR = 0.75), and mastitis (RR = 0.91). No significant effects of monensin were found for milk fever, lameness, dystocia, retained placenta, or metritis. Monensin had no effect on first-service conception risk (RR = 0.97) or days to pregnancy (hazard ratio = 0.93). However, the impact of monensin on dystocia, retained placenta, and metritis was heterogeneous for all 3 outcome measures and random effect models were utilized. Causes of the heterogeneity were explored with meta-regression. Days of treatment with monensin before calving increased the risk of dystocia. Delivery method of monensin influenced the incidence of retained placenta and metritis, with risk being lower with controlled release capsule treatment compared with delivery in either topdress or in a total mixed ration. Days of treatment before calving also influenced retained placenta with an increase in risk with more days treated before calving. Improvements in ketosis, displaced abomasums, and mastitis with monensin were achieved. Exposure to prolonged treatment in the dry period with monensin may increase the risk of dystocia and retained placenta.  
  Address Department of Population Medicine, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada N1G 2W1. tduffiel@uoguelph.ca  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2008/05/20  
  ISSN 1525-3198 (Electronic) 0022-0302 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, AGRICOLA, CAB (Abstracts?) and Google Scholar searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 655 Serial 2401  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Duffield, T.F.; Rabiee, A.R.; Lean, I.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A meta-analysis of the impact of monensin in lactating dairy cattle. Part 2. Production effects Type Journal Article
  Year 2008 Publication Journal of Dairy Science Abbreviated Journal J Dairy Sci  
  Volume 91 Issue 4 Pages 1347-1360  
  Keywords Animal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena; Animals; Body Constitution/drug effects; Body Weight/drug effects; Cattle/metabolism; Dairying; Diet/veterinary; Eating/drug effects; Fats/analysis; Female; Ionophores/pharmacology; Lactation/drug effects; Milk/chemistry/drug effects; Milk Proteins/analysis/drug effects; Monensin/pharmacology; Cattle  
  Abstract A meta-analysis of the impact of monensin on production outcomes in dairy cattle was conducted using the 36 papers and 77 trials that contained eligible data. Statistical analyses were conducted in STATA and included a consideration of fixed or random effects models, assessment of publication bias, and impact of influential studies. Meta-regression was used to investigate sources of heterogeneity of response. There were 71 trials containing data from 255 trial sites and 9,677 cows examining milk production and composition. Monensin use in lactating dairy cattle significantly decreased dry matter intake by 0.3 kg, but increased milk yield by 0.7 kg and improved milk production efficiency by 2.5%. Monensin decreased milk fat percentage 0.13%, but had no effect on milk fat yield; however, there was significant heterogeneity between studies for both of these responses. Milk protein percentage was decreased 0.03%, but protein yield was increased 0.016 kg/d with treatment. Monensin had no effect on milk lactose percentage. Monensin increased body condition score by 0.03 and similarly improved body weight change (0.06 kg/d). Analysis of milk fatty acid profile data indicated that monensin was associated with a reduction of short-chain fatty acids (from 1 to 12% reduction) and stearic acid (-7.8%). The impact of monensin on linoleic and linolenic acids was variable, but monensin significantly increased conjugated linoleic acid (22%). Meta-regression of the effect of monensin on milk component percentages and yields indicated an influence of delivery method, stage of lactation, dose, and diet. Increasing concentrations of C18:1 in the diet enhanced the effect of monensin on decreasing milk fat yield, whereas increasing the rumen peptide balance increased the effect of monensin on milk protein yield. These findings indicate a benefit of monensin for improving milk production efficiency while maintaining body condition. The effect of monensin on milk fat percentage and yield was influenced by diet.  
  Address Department of Population Medicine, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, N1G 2W1, Canada. tduffiel@uoguelph.ca  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2008/03/20  
  ISSN 1525-3198 (Electronic) 0022-0302 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, AGRICOLA, CAB (Abstracts?) and Google Scholar searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 656 Serial 2402  
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