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Author (up) Cusack, P.; McMeniman, N.; Rabiee, A.; Lean, I. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Assessment of the effects of supplementation with vitamin E on health and production of feedlot cattle using meta-analysis Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication Preventive Veterinary Medicine Abbreviated Journal Prev Vet Med  
  Volume 88 Issue 4 Pages 229-246  
  Keywords Animals; Antioxidants/administration & dosage; Cattle/growth & development/physiology; Dietary Supplements; Energy Intake/drug effects/physiology; Nutritional Requirements; Nutritional Status; Oxidative Stress/drug effects; Vitamin E/administration & dosage; Weight Gain/drug effects/physiology; Cattle  
  Abstract Delivery of supplemental antioxidant vitamins to cattle placed in feedlots might be expected to improve health and performance outcomes by reducing the effects of oxidative stress to which these cattle are presumably exposed. Meta-analytic procedures were used in this study to assess published experiments on the effects of vitamin E supplementation in feedlot cattle. The health outcome of morbidity, and the production outcomes of average daily gain (ADG) and gain to feed ratio (G:F), were analysed. The currently available data do not support the use of supplemental vitamin E administered as an injection (morbidity risk ratio=1.17; P=0.17). The authors conclude that supplemental dietary vitamin E should be fed within the [NRC, 1996. National Research Council. Nutrient Requirements of Beef Cattle, 7th ed. Natl. Acad. Press, Washington, DC] recommended range.  
  Address Australian Livestock Production Services, 102 Darling St., Cowra, NSW 2794, Australia. pcusack@nexon.com.au  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2009/01/27  
  ISSN 0167-5877 (Print) 0167-5877 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes CAB, AGRICOLA and Biological Abstracts searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 641 Serial 2385  
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Author (up) da Silva, N.; Carriquiry, A.; O'Neill, K.; Opriessnig, T.; O'Connor, A.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Mixed treatment comparison meta-analysis of porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) vaccines used in piglets Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Preventive Veterinary Medicine Abbreviated Journal Prev Vet Med  
  Volume 117 Issue 3-4 Pages 413-24  
  Keywords Pigs; Swine; Porcine circovirus type 2; PCV2; Vaccination  
  Abstract Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) vaccination is globally one of the most commonly used intervention strategies in growing pigs since several products became commercially available in 2006. While multiple trials have described the efficacy of individual PCV2 vaccines relative to non-vaccination, few studies provide product-to-product comparisons of efficacy. Given the well-documented efficacy of PCV2 vaccines, information about the comparative efficacy of available vaccines is more relevant to producers and veterinarians than comparison to non-vaccination. The objective of this study was to provide comparative estimates of changes in average daily gain effect associated with the use of the commercially available PCV2 vaccines. PubMed, CAB Abstracts, AGRICOLA, the USA Department of Agriculture Center for Veterinary Biologics database of licenses and provisions, and the proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the American Association of Swine Veterinarians, the Allen D. Leman Swine Conference, the Iowa State University Swine Disease Conference for Swine Practitioners, and the International Pig Veterinary Society Congress were used as the sources of information. Trials of licensed PCV2 vaccines administered according to manufacturers' specifications to intensively raised piglets with a known herd porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) status were considered relevant to the meta-analysis. Relevant studies had to report average daily gain (ADG) from weaning to finish and PCV2 infection had to be naturally occurring.  
  Address Department of Statistics, Iowa State University College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Ames, IA 50011, United States. Department of Veterinary Diagnostics and Production Animal Medicine, Iowa State University College of Veterinary Medicine, 1600 South 16th Street, Ames, IA 50011, United States. Department of Veterinary Diagnostics and Production Animal Medicine, Iowa State University College of Veterinary Medicine, 1600 South 16th Street, Ames, IA 50011, United States; The Roslin Institute and The Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies, University of Edinburgh, Easter Bush, Midlothian EH25 9RG, Scotland, UK. Department of Veterinary Diagnostics and Production Animal Medicine, Iowa State University College of Veterinary Medicine, 1600 South 16th Street, Ames, IA 50011, United States. Electronic address: oconnor@iastate.edu.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2014/12/03  
  ISSN 1873-1716 (Electronic) 0167-5877 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, CAB Abstracts and AGRICOLA searched, plus other sources Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1288 Serial 2775  
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Author (up) da Silva, T.P.; Moreira, J.C.; Peres, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title [Are tick medications pesticides? Implications for health and risk perception for workers in the dairy cattle sector] Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Ciencia & Saude Coletiva Abbreviated Journal Cien Saude Colet  
  Volume 17 Issue 2 Pages 311-325  
  Keywords Animals; Attitude; Brazil; Cattle; Dairying; Humans; Occupational Exposure; Occupational Health; Pesticides; Risk; Tick Control/legislation & jurisprudence  
  Abstract This article seeks to characterize the risks related to the use of pesticides in dairy production, in terms of legislation, health and perception of risk for workers involved in this activity. It is based on methodological articulation that included: a) systematic review of the reference literature on the research topic; b) analysis of related legislation (veterinary products and pesticides); c) risk identification regarding the use of veterinary products formulated using active ingredients listed as pesticides; d) and risk perception analysis of a group of dairy production workers. Results indicate a situation of particular interest to Public Health. Regarding dairy production workers, the invisibility of risks associated with handling pesticides for veterinary use, increases their exposure and is related to several health problems, especially for women. This same invisibility leads to a neglect of the prohibition period between pesticide use and consumption of other products. Part of the problem may be associated with the non-classification of pesticides for veterinary use as 'pesticides' (they are classified as veterinary products), which highlights the importance and the urgency of discussion of the theme.  
  Address Universidade Gama Filho, Rio de Janeiro, RJ.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Portuguese Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2012/01/24  
  ISSN 1678-4561 (Electronic) 1413-8123 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, SciELO and LILACS searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 642 Serial 2386  
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Author (up) Davlin, S.L.; Vonville, H.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Canine rabies vaccination and domestic dog population characteristics in the developing world: a systematic review Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Vaccine Abbreviated Journal Vaccine  
  Volume 30 Issue 24 Pages 3492-3502  
  Keywords Animals; China/epidemiology; Developing Countries; Dog Diseases/epidemiology/prevention & control; Dogs; Endemic Diseases; Humans; India/epidemiology; Pakistan/epidemiology; Rabies/epidemiology/prevention & control/veterinary; Rabies Vaccines/administration & dosage; Vaccination/methods/utilization  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Human rabies remains a significant problem in many developing countries, where canine rabies is the most common means of transmission. Although vaccination of dogs has been shown to be the most effective method of prevention in humans, dog vaccination is often lacking. METHODS: This systematic review examined dog rabies vaccination coverage achieved following mass vaccination campaigns and dog ecology/management factors relevant to rabies control in the developing world. We searched a variety of electronic databases for published articles pertaining to dog rabies vaccination or dog ecology where data were collected utilizing a household cluster survey. We reviewed studies published between January 1, 1980 and present and identified 29 articles for inclusion. RESULTS: We found the majority of vaccination campaigns were able to achieve the WHO recommended vaccination coverage of >/= 70% and calculated weighted mean post-campaign vaccination coverage of 76.5% in urban areas and 73.7% in rural areas. However, we found an absence of studies related to dog vaccination/dog ecology from countries with the greatest burden of rabies such as India, China, and Pakistan. In addition, the majority of dogs in the developing world are very young and short-lived, reducing the effectiveness of vaccination campaigns. CONCLUSIONS: Future studies on canine ecology should be undertaken in countries with high endemic canine rabies. New methods for improving the longevity of dogs and reducing high dog population turnover need to be investigated. Programs which encourage good dog management and promote responsible pet ownership are essential to eliminating canine and human rabies.  
  Address University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, School of Public Health, 1200 Hermann Pressler, Houston, TX 77030, USA. ms epi@yahoo.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2012/04/07  
  ISSN 1873-2518 (Electronic) 0264-410X (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, African Journals Online, Public Affairs Information Service (PAIS) Archive, PAIS International and Scopus searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 643 Serial 2387  
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Author (up) de Boer, M.W.; LeBlanc, S.J.; Dubuc, J.; Meier, S.; Heuwieser, W.; Arlt, S.; Gilbert, R.O.; McDougall, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Invited review: Systematic review of diagnostic tests for reproductive-tract infection and inflammation in dairy cows Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Journal of Dairy Science Abbreviated Journal J Dairy Sci  
  Volume 97 Issue 7 Pages 3983-99  
  Keywords Cattle; Dairy cows  
  Abstract The objective of this study was to conduct a systematic and critical appraisal of the quality of previous publications and describe diagnostic methods, diagnostic criteria and definitions, repeatability, and agreement among methods for diagnosis of vaginitis, cervicitis, endometritis, salpingitis, and oophoritis in dairy cows. Publications (n = 1,600) that included the words “dairy,” “cows,” and at least one disease of interest were located with online search engines. In total, 51 papers were selected for comprehensive review by pairs of the authors. Only 61% (n = 31) of the 51 reviewed papers provided a definition or citation for the disease or diagnostic methods studied, and only 49% (n = 25) of the papers provided the data or a citation to support the test cut point used for diagnosing disease. Furthermore, a large proportion of the papers did not provide sufficient detail to allow critical assessment of the quality of design or reporting. Of 11 described diagnostic methods, only one complete methodology, i.e., vaginoscopy, was assessed for both within- and between-operator repeatability (kappa = 0.55-0.60 and 0.44, respectively). In the absence of a gold standard, comparisons between different tests have been undertaken. Agreement between the various diagnostic methods is at a low level. These discrepancies may indicate that these diagnostic methods assess different aspects of reproductive health and underline the importance of tying diagnostic criteria to objective measures of reproductive performance. Those studies that used a reproductive outcome to select cut points and tests have the greatest clinical utility. This approach has demonstrated, for example, that presence of (muco)purulent discharge in the vagina and an increased proportion of leukocytes in cytological preparations following uterine lavage or cytobrush sampling are associated with poorer reproductive outcomes. The lack of validated, consistent definitions and outcome variables makes comparisons of the different tests difficult. The quality of design and reporting in future publications could be improved by using checklists as a guideline. Further high-quality research based on published standards to improve study design and reporting should improve cow-side diagnostic tests. Specifically, more data on intra- and interobserver agreement are needed to evaluate test variability. Also, more studies are necessary to determine optimal cut points and time postpartum of examination.  
  Address Cognosco, Anexa Animal Health, Morrinsville 3300, New Zealand; Epicentre, Institute of Veterinary, Animal and Biomedical Sciences, Massey University, Palmerston North 4442, New Zealand. Electronic address: mdeboer@anexa.co.nz. Department of Population Medicine, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario N1G 2W1, Canada. Departement de Sciences Cliniques, Faculte de Medecine Veterinaire, Universite de Montreal, Saint-Hyacinthe, Quebec J2S 7C6, Canada. DairyNZ Limited, Hamilton 3240, New Zealand. Clinic for Animal Reproduction, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Freie Universitat Berlin, 14163 Berlin, Germany. Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853. Cognosco, Anexa Animal Health, Morrinsville 3300, New Zealand.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2014/05/20  
  ISSN 1525-3198 (Electronic) 0022-0302 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes CAB Abstracts, MEDLINE and Web of Science searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1225 Serial 2714  
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Author (up) de Laforcade, A.; Goggs, R.; Wiinberg, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Systematic evaluation of evidence on veterinary viscoelastic testing Part 3: Assay activation and test protocol Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Journal of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care (San Antonio, Tex. : 2001) Abbreviated Journal J Vet Emerg Crit Care (San Antonio)  
  Volume 24 Issue 1 Pages 37-46  
  Keywords Animals; Blood Specimen Collection/methods; Blood Specimen Collection/standards; Blood Specimen Collection/veterinary; Cats/blood; Dogs/blood; Horses/blood; Reference Standards; Thrombelastography/instrumentation; Thrombelastography/methods; Thrombelastography/veterinary; Veterinary Medicine/standards; Animals; Dogs; Cats; Horses  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To systematically examine the evidence on activating agents and test protocols for the thrombelastography (TEG) and rotational thrombelastometry (ROTEM) viscoelastic point-of-care instruments and to identify knowledge gaps. DESIGN: Ten questions were considered, the primary question addressed the use of activating agents and secondary questions addressed assay temperature, length of analysis, pipetting, sample volume, reproducibility, and quality controls. Standardized, systematic evaluation of the literature was performed. Relevant articles were categorized according to level of evidence (LOE). Consensus was developed regarding conclusions for application of concepts to clinical practice. SETTING: Academic and referral veterinary medical centers. RESULTS: PubMed and CAB abstracts were searched. Twenty papers were initially identified concerning the primary question; 16 were in support of the questions (LOE 2 Good, LOE 3 Good, LOE 5 Good, LOE 6 Good, LOE 5 Fair, LOE 6 Fair); and 4 were neutral (LOE 3 Good, LOE 6 Good, LOE Fair, LOE 5 Fair). Additional papers were evaluated post hoc during manuscript preparation. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, there is a body of evidence from veterinary and human medicine that strongly suggests that TEG or ROTEM assays using citrated samples that employ an activator have significantly lower inherent variability than those that use recalcification alone. There is also strong evidence in dogs, cats, and humans that the results obtained using different activators are not directly comparable. There is no evidence to suggest that any one activating agent is superior to another for all patient populations, or drug monitoring indications. As such, use of more than one assay for complete thromboelastographic evaluation of a patient's coagulation system may be warranted. Standardization of the concentrations of activators would be beneficial.  
  Address From the Department of Clinical Sciences, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, Tufts University, North Grafton, MA.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2014/01/16  
  ISSN 1476-4431 (Electronic) 1476-4431 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed and CAB Abstracts searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1187 Serial 2681  
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Author (up) de Vasconcelos, T.C.B.; Furtado, M.C.; Belo, V.S.; Morgado, F.N.; Figueiredo, F.B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Canine susceptibility to visceral leishmaniasis: A systematic review upon genetic aspects, considering breed factors and immunological concepts Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Infection Genetics and Evolution Abbreviated Journal Infect Genet Evol  
  Volume Epublication ahead of print Issue Pages  
  Keywords Dog; Visceral leishmaniasis; Genetics  
  Abstract Dogs have different susceptibility degrees to leishmaniasis; however, genetic research on this theme is scarce, manly on visceral form. The aims of this systematic review were to describe and discuss the existing scientific findings on genetic susceptibility to canine leishmaniasis, as well as to show the gaps of the existing knowledge. Twelve articles were selected, including breed immunological studies, genome wide associations or other gene polymorphism or gene sequencing studies, and transcription approaches. As main results of literature, there was a suggestion of genetic clinical resistance background for Ibizan Hound dogs, and alleles associated with protection or susceptibility to visceral leishmaniasis in Boxer dogs. Genetic markers can explain phenotypic variance in both pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and in cellular immune responses, including antigen presentation. Many gene segments are involved in canine visceral leishmaniasis phenotype, with Natural Resistance Associated Macrophage Protein 1 (NRAMP1) as the most studied. This was related to both protection and susceptibility. In comparison with murine and human genetic approaches, lack of knowledge in dogs is notorious, with many possibilities for new studies, revealing a wide field to be assessed on canine leishmaniasis susceptibility research.  
  Address Centro de Controle de Zoonoses, Vigilancia em Saude, Secretaria Municipal de Saude, Prefeitura Municipal de Resende, Rua Euridices Paulina de Almeida, 300, Vicentina II, Resende, RJ 27500-000, Brazil. Electronic address: tassia.vasconcelos@gmail.com. Fiocruz Mata Atlantica, Fundacao Oswaldo Cruz, Estrada Rodrigues Caldas, 3400, Taquara, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 22713-375, Brazil. Universidade Federal de Sao Joao del-Rei, campus Centro Oeste Dona Lindu, Rua Sebastiao Goncalves Coelho, 400, Chanadour, Divinopolis, MG 35.501-296, Brazil. Laboratorio de Pesquisa em Leishmaniose, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, Fundacao Oswaldo Cruz, Av. Brasil, 4365, Manguinhos, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 21040-360, Brazil. Laboratorio de Biologia Celular, Instituto Carlos Chagas, Rua Professor Algacyr Munhoz Mader, 3.775, CIC, campus do Tecpar, bloco C, Curitiba, PR 81.350-010 Brazil.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2017/10/11  
  ISSN 1567-7257 (Electronic) 1567-1348 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed and Google Scholar searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1455 Serial 2911  
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Author (up) de Vries, S.G.; Visser, B.J.; Nagel, I.M.; Goris, M.G.; Hartskeerl, R.A.; Grobusch, M.P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Leptospirosis in Sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication International Journal of Infectious Diseases Abbreviated Journal Int J Infect Dis  
  Volume 28 Issue Pages 47-64  
  Keywords Dogs; Cattle; Sheep; Goats; Pigs; Donkeys; Camels  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Leptospirosis is an emerging zoonotic infection worldwide, possibly due to climate change and demographic shifts. It is regarded as endemic in Sub-Saharan Africa; however, for most countries scarce epidemiological data, if any, exist. The primary objectives were to describe the prevalence of leptospirosis in countries in Sub-Saharan Africa, and to develop options for prevention and control in the future. METHODS: A systematic review was conducted to determine the prevalence of leptospirosis in Sub-Saharan Africa; the PRISMA guidelines were followed. Medline/PubMed, Embase, The Cochrane Library, Web of Science, BIOSIS Previews, the African Index Medicus, AJOL, and Google Scholar were searched. RESULTS: Information about the prevalence and incidence of leptospirosis in humans is available, but remains scarce for many countries. Data are unavailable or outdated for many countries, particularly those in Central Africa. Most data are available from animals, probably due to the economic losses caused by leptospirosis in livestock. In humans, leptospirosis is an important cause of febrile illness in Sub-Saharan Africa. It concerns numerous serogroups, harboured by many different animal carriers. DISCUSSION: A wide variety of data was identified. Prevalence rates vary throughout the continent and more research, especially in humans, is needed to reliably gauge the extent of the problem. Preventive measures need to be reconsidered to control outbreaks in the future.  
  Address Center of Tropical Medicine and Travel Medicine, Department of Infectious Diseases, Division of Internal Medicine, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 9, 1100 DE, room F4-220, Amsterdam, Netherlands. Medical Library, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Netherlands. WHO/FAO/OIE and National Leptospirosis Reference Centre, KIT Biomedical Research, Amsterdam, Netherlands. Center of Tropical Medicine and Travel Medicine, Department of Infectious Diseases, Division of Internal Medicine, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 9, 1100 DE, room F4-220, Amsterdam, Netherlands. Electronic address: m.p.grobusch@amc.uva.nl.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language eng Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2014/09/10  
  ISSN 1878-3511 (Electronic) 1201-9712 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, Biosis Previews, CINAHL, African Index Medicus, African Journals Online and Google Scholar searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1311 Serial 2792  
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Author (up) DeDonder, K.D.; Apley, M.D. doi  openurl
  Title A literature review of antimicrobial resistance in Pathogens associated with bovine respiratory disease Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Anim Health Research Reviews Abbreviated Journal Anim Health Res Rev  
  Volume 16 Issue 2 Pages 125-134  
  Keywords Cattle; Bovines; Bovine respiratory disease; Antimicrobial resistance  
  Abstract The objective of this paper was to perform a critical review of the literature as it pertains to the current status of antimicrobial resistance in pathogens associated with bovine respiratory disease (BRD) in beef cattle and to provide a concise yet informative narrative on the most relevant publications available. As such, the scientific literature contained in PubMed, AGRICOLA, and CAB were searched in February of 2014 for articles related to susceptibility testing of Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida, and Histophilus somni from cases of BRD. Titles and abstracts were read and 105 articles that were relevant to the subject of BRD antibiotic resistance were attained for further review. After the application of exclusion criterion (publications must have originated from North America, be in English, adhere to standards set forth by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute, and be concerning antimicrobial resistance in BRD in beef cattle), 16 articles remained and are the focus of this publication. Due to the disparate data from the few studies that investigate susceptibility testing of BRD pathogens, a quantitative assessment or meta-analysis was not performed on the studies presented in this review. However, considering diagnostic lab data, there appears to be a clear trend of a decrease in susceptibility of the three major BRD pathogens to the antimicrobials used commonly for treatment and control of BRD. Studies performing sensitivity testing on healthy cattle report much lower resistance, but it remains unclear if this is because of a true lack of resistance mechanisms, or if the isolates do contain quiescent genes for resistance that are only phenotypically expressed following the administration of an antimicrobial for either treatment or control of BRD. Future research to address this question of genotype and phenotypic expression before and after antimicrobial administration will further advance our knowledge in this area.  
  Address Diagnostic Medicine/Pathobiology,Kansas State University College of Veterinary Medicine,KS 66506,USA. Clinical Sciences,Kansas State University College of Veterinary Medicine,KS 66506,USA.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2015/09/17  
  ISSN 1475-2654 (Electronic) 1466-2523 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, AGRICOLA, and CAB searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1386 Serial 2852  
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Author (up) Deisenroth, A.; Nolte, I.; Wefstaedt, P. url  openurl
  Title [Use of gold implants as a treatment of pain related to canine hip dysplasia--a review. Part 2: Clinical trials and case reports] Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Tierarztliche Praxis. Ausgabe K, Kleintiere/Heimtiere Abbreviated Journal Tierarztl Prax Ausg K Kleintiere Heimtiere  
  Volume 41 Issue 4 Pages 244-254  
  Keywords Dogs  
  Abstract Gold bead implantation/gold acupuncture is becoming increasingly used in veterinary medicine as a method of pain treatment in cases of osteoarthritic diseases. Part one of the overview dealing with the use of gold implants as a treatment of canine hip joint dysplasia (cHD) introduced the method of implanting gold in tissue and publications which investigated the subsequent effects of implantation. This article focuses on publications concerning the clinical effectiveness of gold implantation within the scope of pain therapy in cHD. Due to the study design, a classification using evidence-based levels (EbL) was carried out. Three double-blind, placebo-controlled randomised studies (EbL II) were considered together with three retrospective studies on own patients (EbL IV) and five case studies (EbL IV). While the case and retrospective studies reported impressive therapeutic success in treating cHD-incurred pain with gold implantation, a pain-reducing effect through gold implantation was only demonstrated in one of the three double-blind studies. The two remaining EbL II studies found no differences between the placebo-group and the group of dogs treated with gold implantation. In one of these two studies, kinematic and kinetic gait analyses were used for objective evaluation of the effects of the treatment. Thus, the only study that carried out an objective evaluation of the therapeutic result of gold implantation came to the conclusion that the method is ineffective. For a concluding assessment of gold implantation in the case of cHD, gait analysis studies investigating the effects of gold implantation in comparison to a standard treatment with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are currently lacking.  
  Address Dr. med. vet. Patrick Wefstaedt, Klinik fur Kleintiere, Stiftung Tierarztliche Hochschule Hannover, Bunteweg 9, 30559 Hannover, E-Mail: Patrick.Wefstaedt@tiho-hannover.de.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language German Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2013/08/21  
  ISSN 1434-1239 (Print) 1434-1239 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, CAB (Abstracts?) and Google Scholar searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1168 Serial 2664  
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Author (up) Deisenroth, A.; Nolte, I.; Wefstaedt, P. url  openurl
  Title [Use of gold implants as a treatment of pain related to canine hip dysplasia--a review. Part 1: Background and current state of research regarding the effects of implanting gold in tissue] Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Tierarztliche Praxis. Ausgabe K, Kleintiere/Heimtiere Abbreviated Journal Tierarztl Prax Ausg K Kleintiere Heimtiere  
  Volume 41 Issue 2 Pages 107-116  
  Keywords Dogs  
  Abstract Gold-bead implantation as a method of pain treatment in dogs suffering from osteoarthritic disease is receiving increasing attention in veterinary medicine. For the present article, publications from veterinary books and journals were collected and evaluated, together with related articles in human medicine. After providing an overview of the historical use of gold and gold compounds, the technique of implanting this noble metal is introduced. The reasons for establishing the terms gold acupuncture and gold (bead) implantation are described, considering the question whether and what kind of methodological differences exist behind these terms. Next, previous publications concerning the effects of gold implantation in tissue are summarised. In 2002 it was proven that gold ions are released from the surface of gold implants by a process termed dissolucytosis. Subsequent publications further investigated details about the interaction between gold ions and tissue as well as the distribution pattern of bio-released ions. Gold compounds were previously used for chrysotherapy in human medicine until medication with fewer side effects became established. The anti-inflammatory and immuno-modulatory properties of gold compounds were used to treat rheumatoid arthritis. Current research aims to ascertain whether the anti-inflammatory and immuno-modulating effects of gold compounds are imitated by gold ions released from gold implants at a local level. In conclusion, the present review summarises important findings about the effects of gold implanted in tissue. However, further research is necessary to estimate the limitations and benefits of this auromedication.  
  Address Klinik fur Kleintiere, Stiftung Tierarztliche Hochschule Hannover, Bunteweg 9, Hannover. Patrick.Wefstaedt@tiho-hannover.de  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language German Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2013/04/24  
  ISSN 1434-1239 (Print) 1434-1239 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, CAB (Abstracts?) and Google Scholar searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1169 Serial 2665  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Denagamage, T.; Jayarao, B.; Patterson, P.; Wallner-Pendleton, E.; Kariyawasam, S. doi  openurl
  Title Risk Factors Associated With Salmonella in Laying Hen Farms: Systematic Review of Observational Studies Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Avian Diseases Abbreviated Journal Avian Dis  
  Volume 59 Issue 2 Pages 291-302  
  Keywords Poultry; Chickens; Salmonella  
  Abstract Salmonella contamination of laying hen flocks and shell eggs is associated with various management and environmental factors. Foodborne outbreaks of human salmonellosis have been traced back to consumption of Salmonella-contaminated shell eggs. In the present study, a systematic literature review was conducted to identify and provide an evidence-based overview of potential risk factors of Salmonella contamination of laying hens, layer premises, and shell eggs. This systematic literature search was conducted using AGRICOLA, CAB Abstracts, and PubMed databases. Observational studies that identified risk factors for Salmonella contamination of layer flocks and shell eggs were selected, and best evidence was synthesized to summarize the results. Altogether, 13 cross-sectional studies and four longitudinal studies published in English were included in the review. Evidence scores were assigned based on the study design and quality of the study to grade the evidence level. The strength of association of a risk factor was determined according to the odds ratios. In this systematic review, the presence of previous Salmonella infection, absence of cleaning and disinfection, presence of rodents, induced molting, larger flock size (>30,000 hens), multiage management, cage housing systems, in-line egg processing, rearing pullets on the floor, pests with access to feed prior to movement to the feed trough, visitors allowed in the layer houses, and trucks near farms and air inlets were identified as the risk factors associated with Salmonella contamination of laying hen premises, whereas high level of manure contamination, middle and late phase of production, high degree of egg-handling equipment contamination, flock size of >30,000, and egg production rate of >96% were identified as the risk factors associated with Salmonella contamination of shell eggs. These risk factors demonstrated strong to moderate evidence of association with Salmonella contamination of laying hens and shell eggs. Eggshells testing positive for Salmonella were 59 times higher when fecal samples were positive and nine times higher when floor dust samples were positive. Risk factors associated with Salmonella Enteritidis infection in laying hens were flock size, housing system, and farms with hens of different ages. As a summary, this systematic review demonstrated that Salmonella contamination of laying hen flocks and shell eggs in layer production systems is multifactorial. This study provides a knowledge base for the implementation of targeted intervention strategies to control Salmonella contamination of laying hen flocks and shell eggs.  
  Address A Department of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802. B Department of Animal Science, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2015/10/17  
  ISSN 0005-2086 (Print) 0005-2086 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes AGRICOLA, CAB Abstracts, and PubMed searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1381 Serial 2848  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Denagamage, T.; O'Connor, A.; Sargeant, J.; McKean, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The association between sub-therapeutic antibiotics and Salmonella Typhimurium in market-weight swine: a systematic review and summation of evidence from 1950 to 2007 Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication Zoonoses and Public Health Abbreviated Journal Zoonoses Public Health  
  Volume 57 Issue 7-8 Pages e14-22  
  Keywords Animal Feed; Animals; Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use; Body Weight; Food Safety; Salmonella Infections, Animal/prevention & control; Salmonella typhimurium/drug effects/isolation & purification; Swine/microbiology; Swine Diseases/prevention & control; Pigs; Swine  
  Abstract A systematic review approach was used to evaluate the association between sub-therapeutic antibiotics in feed and Salmonella Typhimurium isolation in market-weight finisher swine raised in modern swine production systems. Fourteen challenge trials described the efficacy of different antibiotics after challenge with S. Typhimurium. The studies identified were of limited evidentiary value for the review question because they were not relevant to the review question, i.e. conducted in artificial settings on small numbers of young pigs. None of the studies reported using blinding during outcome assessment. No antibiotic regimen was evaluated more than once. The association between sub-therapeutic antibiotics and Salmonella outcomes in market-weight swine raised in modern production systems cannot be summarized using the currently available literature. Many available studies fail to report critical study design features such as blinding and/or to take into account the data generated from longitudinal studies.  
  Address Department of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences, College of Agricultural Sciences, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, USA.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2010/05/25  
  ISSN 1863-2378 (Electronic) 1863-1959 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes AGRICOLA, AGIRS (AGRIS?), Biological and Agricultural Index, Biological Abstracts, Biosis Previews, CAB Abstracts, Current Contents, Dissertation Abstracts, Food Science and Technology Abstracts, Ingenta Gateway, MEDLINE, PubMed and Web of Science searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 644 Serial 2388  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Denagamage, T.N.; O'Connor, A.M.; Sargeant, J.M.; Rajic, A.; McKean, J.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Efficacy of vaccination to reduce Salmonella prevalence in live and slaughtered swine: a systematic review of literature from 1979 to 2007 Type Journal Article
  Year 2007 Publication Foodborne Pathogens and Disease Abbreviated Journal Foodborne Pathog Dis  
  Volume 4 Issue 4 Pages 539-549  
  Keywords Abattoirs; Animals; Body Weight; Consumer Product Safety; Food Contamination/prevention & control; Food Microbiology; Salmonella/growth & development/immunology; Salmonella Food Poisoning/prevention & control; Salmonella Infections, Animal/epidemiology/prevention & control; Salmonella Vaccines/immunology; Swine/microbiology; Swine Diseases/epidemiology/prevention & control; Pigs; Swine  
  Abstract A systematic review was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of vaccination to reduce Salmonella prevalence in market weight finisher swine. A search of online databases and selected conference proceedings was conducted to identify relevant studies. The review process followed relevance screening, methodological quality assessment, and data extraction. Although multiple outcomes were frequently reported, only outcomes describing culture of Salmonella were extracted. Five clinical trials and 23 challenge studies were considered likely relevant to the review as they described vaccination to reduce Salmonella in swine. Five clinical trials reported vaccination was associated with reduced isolation of Salmonella in market weight pigs, however, information required to assess the internal validity of the study was often not described in the manuscripts. All challenge studies assessed vaccine efficacy in pigs aged <15 weeks reducing the relevance of results to the review which focused on market weight pigs. Only five of the 23 challenge studies reported the majority of information necessary to evaluate the quality of vaccine studies. Given large variability in population type, sample size, type of vaccine, dose and dosing regimens, and type of outcomes observed, pooled data analysis was not possible, and therefore, a qualitative synthesis of the studies was conducted. Available evidence suggests that vaccination is associated with reduced Salmonella prevalence in swine at or near harvest; however, this conclusion is based on studies with design and reporting deficiencies that could potentially indicate biases with the outcome.  
  Address Department of Veterinary Diagnostic and Production Animal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011-1250, USA. thomasde@iastate.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2007/11/29  
  ISSN 1535-3141 (Print) 1535-3141 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes AGRICOLA, AGRIS, Biological and Agricultural Index, Biological Abstracts, Biosis Previews, CAB Abstracts, Current Contents, Dissertation Abstracts (ProQuest Digital Dissertations), Food Science and Technology Abstracts, Ingenta Gateway, MEDLINE, PubMed and Web of Science searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 645 Serial 2389  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Dettenmaier, S.J.; Messmer, T.A.; Hovick, T.J.; Dahlgren, D.K. doi  openurl
  Title Effects of livestock grazing on rangeland biodiversity: A meta-analysis of grouse populations Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Ecology and Evolution Abbreviated Journal Ecol Evol  
  Volume 7 Issue 19 Pages 7620-7627  
  Keywords Grouse; Livestock grazing; Biodiversity  
  Abstract Livestock grazing affects over 60% of the world's agricultural lands and can influence rangeland ecosystem services and the quantity and quality of wildlife habitat, resulting in changes in biodiversity. Concomitantly, livestock grazing has the potential to be detrimental to some wildlife species while benefiting other rangeland organisms. Many imperiled grouse species require rangeland landscapes that exhibit diverse vegetation structure and composition to complete their life cycle. However, because of declining populations and reduced distributions, grouse are increasingly becoming a worldwide conservation concern. Grouse, as a suite of upland gamebirds, are often considered an umbrella species for other wildlife and thus used as indicators of rangeland health. With a projected increase in demand for livestock products, better information will be required to mitigate the anthropogenic effects of livestock grazing on rangeland biodiversity. To address this need, we completed a data-driven and systematic review of the peer-reviewed literature to determine the current knowledge of the effects of livestock grazing on grouse populations (i.e., chick production and population indices) worldwide. Our meta-analysis revealed an overall negative effect of livestock grazing on grouse populations. Perhaps more importantly, we identified an information void regarding the effects of livestock grazing on the majority of grouse species. Additionally, the reported indirect effects of livestock grazing on grouse species were inconclusive and more reflective of differences in the experimental design of the available studies. Future studies designed to evaluate the direct and indirect effects of livestock grazing on wildlife should document (i) livestock type, (ii) timing and frequency of grazing, (iii) duration, and (iv) stocking rate. Much of this information was lacking in the available published studies we reviewed, but is essential when making comparisons between different livestock grazing management practices and their potential impacts on rangeland biodiversity.  
  Address Department of Wildland ResourcesJack H. Berryman InstituteUtah State UniversityLoganUTUSA. Ecology CenterUtah State UniversityLoganUTUSA. Range Science ProgramSchool of Natural Resource SciencesNorth Dakota State UniversityFargoNDUSA.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2017/10/19  
  ISSN 2045-7758 (Print) 2045-7758 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes ISI Web of Science and Scopus searched Approved no  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1454 Serial 2910  
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Author (up) Dhollander, S.; Belsham, G.J.; Lange, M.; Willgert, K.; Alexandrov, T.; Chondrokouki, E.; Depner, K.; Khomenko, S.; Ozyoruk, F.; Salman, M.; Thulke, H.H.; Botner, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Assessing the potential spread and maintenance of foot-and-mouth disease virus infection in wild ungulates: general principles and application to a specific scenario in Thrace Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Transboundary and Emerging Diseases Abbreviated Journal Transbound Emerg Dis  
  Volume Epublication ahead of print Issue Pages  
  Keywords Deer; Wild boar; Wild animals  
  Abstract Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), due to infection with serotype O virus, occurred in wild boar and within eleven outbreaks in domestic livestock in the south-east of Bulgaria, Thrace region, in 2011. Hence, the issue of the potential for the spread and maintenance of FMD virus (FMDV) infection in a population of wild ungulates became important. This assessment focused on the spread and maintenance of FMDV infection within a hypothetical wild boar and deer population in an environment, which is characterized by a climate transitional between Mediterranean and continental and variable wildlife population densities. The assessment was based on three aspects: (i) a systematic review of the literature focusing on experimental infection studies to identify the parameters describing the duration of FMDV infection in deer and wild boar, as well as observational studies assessing the occurrence of FMDV infection in wild deer and wild boar populations, (ii) prevalence survey data of wild boar and deer in Bulgaria and Turkey and (iii) an epidemiological model, simulating the host-to-host spread of FMDV infections. It is concluded, based on all three aspects, that the wildlife population in Thrace, and so wildlife populations in similar ecological settings, are probably not able to maintain FMD in the long term in the absence of FMDV infection in the domestic host population. However, limited spread of FMDV infection in time and space in the wildlife populations can occur. If there is a continued cross-over of FMDV between domestic and wildlife populations or a higher population density, virus circulation may be prolonged.  
  Address European Food Safety Authority, Parma, Italy.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2014/06/07  
  ISSN 1865-1682 (Electronic) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes CAB Abstracts, PubMed, Web of Science, HAL, Agricola, Agris (FAO), DEFRA, NAHIS, OIE, USDA-APHIS, DART-Europe E-theses Portal, Index to Theses in France (Fichier Central des Thèses), Index to Theses in Germany and Index to Theses in Great Britain and Ireland searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1236 Serial 2725  
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Author (up) Dias, R.S.; Lopez, S.; Montanholi, Y.R.; Smith, B.; Haas, L.S.; Miller, S.P.; France, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A meta-analysis of the effects of dietary copper, molybdenum, and sulfur on plasma and liver copper, weight gain, and feed conversion in growing-finishing cattle Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Journal of Animal Science Abbreviated Journal J Anim Sci  
  Volume 91 Issue 12 Pages 5714-5723  
  Keywords Cattle; Animal Feed/analysis; Animal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena; Animals; Body Composition/drug effects; Cattle/blood; Cattle/growth & development; Cattle/metabolism; Copper/blood; Copper/chemistry; Copper/pharmacology; Diet/veterinary; Liver/chemistry; Molybdenum/chemistry; Molybdenum/pharmacology; Sulfur/chemistry; Sulfur/pharmacology; Weight Gain/drug effects; Sulfur; Copper; Molybdenum  
  Abstract The minerals Cu, Mo, and S are essential for metabolic functions related to cattle health and performance. The interaction between Cu, Mo, and S can determine the utilization of each mineral, in particular Cu, by ruminants. A meta-analysis was performed to evaluate the effects of dietary Cu, Mo, and S and their interactions on plasma and liver Cu, ADG, and G:F in growing-finishing cattle. Data were collated from 12 published studies. The model with the best fit to data indicated plasma Cu was positively affected by dietary Cu (P < 0.01) and negatively affected by both dietary Mo (P < 0.01) and S (P < 0.01). Another model also indicated that plasma Cu concentration is positively related to Cu:Mo ratio in the diet (P < 0.01). Dietary Cu had a positive effect on liver Cu (P < 0.01), whereas Mo showed a negative effect (P < 0.05), and no effect of dietary S on liver Cu was observed (P > 0.05). Average daily gain was negatively affected by dietary Mo (P < 0.05) and S (P < 0.01) and positively affected by Cu:Mo ratio (P < 0.01), likely because an increased Cu:Mo ratio minimizes the antagonistic effect of Mo on Cu. The feed conversion ratio was negatively affected by Mo (P < 0.05) and S (P < 0.01), whereas effects of the Cu:Mo ratio and dietary Cu were not significant (P > 0.05). The interaction between S and Mo affected (P < 0.01) G:F, which was likely related to a positive response with the proper balance between these minerals. In conclusion, dietary Cu, Mo, and S and the Cu:Mo ratio caused changes in plasma Cu. Only dietary Mo and S led to a negative response in the performance of growing-finishing cattle, whereas the diet Cu:Mo ratio has a linear and quadratic effect on ADG. Nutritionists and producers need to consider with caution the supplementation of growing-finishing cattle diets with Mo and S because of their potentially adverse effects on animal performance. An appropriate Cu:Mo ratio is desirable to minimize the effects of an impaired supply of Mo on Cu metabolism and ADG.  
  Address Department of Animal and Poultry Science, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2013/11/23  
  ISSN 1525-3163 (Electronic) 0021-8812 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, Web of Science and Network Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1179 Serial 2675  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Diraviyam, T.; Zhao, B.; Wang, Y.; Schade, R.; Michael, A.; Zhang, X. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effect of chicken egg yolk antibodies (IgY) against diarrhea in domesticated animals: a systematic review and meta-analysis Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication PloS One Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 9 Issue 5 Pages e97716  
  Keywords Animal Diseases/drug therapy; Animals; Cattle; Chickens; Diarrhea/drug therapy; Diarrhea/veterinary; Immunoglobulins/therapeutic use; MEDLINE; Mice; IgY; Immunoglobulins; Pigs; Swine  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: IgY antibodies are serum immunoglobulin in birds, reptiles and amphibians, and are transferred from serum to egg yolk to confer passive immunity to their embryos and offspring. Currently, the oral passive immunization using chicken IgY has been focused as an alternative to antibiotics for the treatment and control of diarrhea in animals and humans. This systematic review was focused to determine the effect of IgY in controlling and preventing diarrhea in domesticated animals including Piglets, Mice, Poultry and Calves. METHODS AND RESULTS: Previous research reports focused on treatment effect of Chicken IgY against diarrhea were retrieved from different electronic data bases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, SPRINGER-LINK, WILEY, AGRICOLA, MEDWELL Journals, Scientific Publish, Chinese articles from Core periodicals in 2012). A total of 61 studies in 4 different animal classes met the inclusion criteria. Data on study characteristics and outcome measures were extracted. The pooled relative risk (RR) of 49 studies of different animals [Piglets – 22; Mice – 14; Poultry – 7 and Calves – 6] in meta-analyses revealed that, IgY significantly reduced the risk of diarrhea in treatment group when compare to the placebo. However, the 95% confidence intervals of the majority of studies in animal class piglets and calves embrace RR of one. The same results were obtained in sub group analyses (treatment regiment – prophylactic or therapeutic; pathogen type – bacterial or viral). Perhaps, this inconsistency in the effect of IgY at the individual study level and overall effect measures could be influenced by the methodological heterogeneity. CONCLUSION: The present systematic review (SR) and meta-analysis demonstrated the beneficial effect of IgY. This supports the opinion that IgY is useful for prophylaxis and treatment. However, more intensive studies using the gold standard animal experiments with the focus to use IgY alone or in combination with other alternative strategies are indispensable.  
  Address College of Veterinary Medicine, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi, China. College of Veterinary Medicine, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi, China; College of Science, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi, China. Institute of Pharmacology, Charite – Universitatsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany. PSG College of Arts and Science, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu, India.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2014/05/23  
  ISSN 1932-6203 (Electronic) 1932-6203 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes MEDLINE, Embase, SPRINGER-LINK, WILEY, AGRICOLA, MEDWELL Journals, Scientific Research Publish and Chinese articles from Core periodicals searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1223 Serial 2712  
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Author (up) Djabri, B.; Bareille, N.; Beaudeau, F.; Seegers, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Quarter milk somatic cell count in infected dairy cows: a meta-analysis Type Journal Article
  Year 2002 Publication Veterinary Research Abbreviated Journal Vet Res  
  Volume 33 Issue 4 Pages 335-357  
  Keywords Animals; Bacteriological Techniques/veterinary; Cattle; Cell Count/veterinary; Corynebacterium Infections/diagnosis/epidemiology/veterinary; Enterobacteriaceae Infections/diagnosis/epidemiology/veterinary; Female; Mammary Glands, Animal/microbiology/pathology; Mastitis, Bovine/diagnosis/epidemiology/microbiology; Milk/cytology/microbiology; Prevalence; Staphylococcal Infections/diagnosis/epidemiology/veterinary; Streptococcal Infections/diagnosis/epidemiology/veterinary  
  Abstract The aim of this paper was to evaluate the effects associated with intramammary infection (IMI) by a bacterium or a group of bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus dysgalactiae, Streptococcus uberis, coliforms, Staphylococci other than S. aureus, and Corynebacterium bovis) on the somatic cell count (SCC) in quarter milk of dairy cows. Papers selected for analysis had to provide SCC values associated with the natural infection in quarters by different bacteria. Sampling for measurement of SCC and determination of the infection had to be done on the same day. Only papers published in English or in French after 1971 were considered. Twenty-one papers fulfilled the selection criteria. The animals sampled, the measurement techniques for SCC and the bacteriological identification, as well as the definition of the infection, all differed widely among the selected studies. The meta-analysis method was used to estimate both the mean SCC (arithmetic and geometric) value and the average increase on SCC of each type of infection. The geometric mean SCC in bacteriologically negative quarters was 68 000 c/mL. In case of IMI, the retained SCC was 357 000, 857 000, 547 000, 1 024 000, 1 151 000, 138 000 and 105 000 c/mL in quarters infected by Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus dysgalactiae, Streptococcus uberis, coliforms, staphylococci other than S. aureus and Corynebacterium bovis, respectively. The variation factors that could influence these SCC values and the bacteriological results are discussed.  
  Address Unit of Animal Health Management, Veterinary School, INRA, Nantes, France. djabri@vet-nantes.fr  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2002/08/30  
  ISSN 0928-4249 (Print) 0928-4249 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes MEDLINE and CAB searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 646 Serial 2390  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Dodd, C.C.; Sanderson, M.W.; Jacob, M.E.; Renter, D.G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Modeling preharvest and harvest interventions for Escherichia coli O157 contamination of beef cattle carcasses Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Journal of Food Protection Abbreviated Journal J Food Prot  
  Volume 74 Issue 9 Pages 1422-1433  
  Keywords Animal Husbandry/methods; Animals; Cattle/microbiology; Colony Count, Microbial; Escherichia coli O157/growth & development; Feces/microbiology; Food Contamination/analysis/prevention & control; Food Microbiology; Humans; Models, Biological; Monte Carlo Method; Prevalence; Risk Assessment; Risk Factors; Seasons; Skin/microbiology; Stochastic Processes; Transportation; Cattle  
  Abstract Field studies evaluating the effects of multiple concurrent preharvest interventions for Escherichia coli O157 are logistically and economically challenging; however, modeling techniques may provide useful information on these effects while also identifying crucial information gaps that can guide future research. We constructed a risk assessment model with data obtained from a systematic search of scientific literature. Parameter distributions were incorporated into a stochastic Monte Carlo modeling framework to examine the impacts of different combinations of preharvest and harvest interventions for E. coli O157 on the risk of beef carcass contamination. We estimated the risk of E. coli O157 carcass contamination conditional on preharvest fecal prevalence estimates, inclusion of feed additive(s) in the diet, vaccination for E. coli O157, transport and lairage effects, hide intervention(s), and carcass intervention(s). Prevalence parameters for E. coli O157 were assumed to encompass potential effects of concentration; therefore, concentration effects were not specifically evaluated in this study. Sensitivity analyses revealed that fecal prevalence, fecal-to-hide transfer, hide-to-carcass transfer, and carcass intervention efficacy significantly affected the risk of carcass contamination (correlation coefficients of 0.37, 0.56, 0.58, and -0.29, respectively). The results indicated that combinations of preharvest interventions may be particularly important for supplementing harvest interventions during periods of higher variability in fecal shedding prevalence (i.e., summer). Further assessments of the relationships among fecal prevalence and concentration, hide contamination, and subsequent carcass contamination are needed to further define risks and intervention impacts for E. coli O157 contamination of beef.  
  Address Department of Diagnostic Medicine and Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas 66506-5006, USA.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2011/09/10  
  ISSN 1944-9097 (Electronic) 0362-028X (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed and AGRICOLA searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 442 Serial 2391  
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