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Author (up) Charlton, K.E.; Russell, J.; Gorman, E.; Hanich, Q.; Delisle, A.; Campbell, B.; Bell, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Fish, food security and health in Pacific Island countries and territories: a systematic literature review Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication BMC Public Health Abbreviated Journal BMC Public Health  
  Volume 16 Issue Pages 285  
  Keywords Fish; Food security; Pacific Islands  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Pacific Island countries and territories (PICTs) face a double burden of disease, with a high prevalence of household food insecurity and childhood micronutrient deficiencies, accompanied by a burgeoning increase in adult obesity, diabetes and heart disease. METHODS: A systematic literature review was undertaken to assess whether increased availability of, and access to, fish improves a) household food security and b) individual nutritional status. RESULTS: A total of 29 studies were reviewed. Fourteen studies identified fish as the primary food source for Pacific Islanders and five studies reported fish/seafood as the primary source of dietary protein. Fish consumption varied by cultural sub-region and Pacific Island countries and territories. Fish consumption and nutritional status was addressed in nine studies, reporting moderate iodine deficiency in Vanuatu where only 30% of participants consumed mostly fresh fish. Similarly, the degree to which Pacific Islanders depended on fishing for household income and livelihood varied between and within PICTs. For more economically developed countries, household income was derived increasingly from salaried work and dependency on fishing activities has been declining. CONCLUSIONS: Fishing remains a major contributor to food security in PICTs, through subsistence production and income generation. However, there is a paucity of research aimed at assessing how maintaining and/or improving fish consumption benefits the diets and health of Pacific Islanders as they contend with the ongoing nutrition transition that is characterised by an increasing demand for packaged imported foods, such as canned meats, instant noodles, cereals, rice, and sugar-sweetened beverages, with subsequent decreased consumption of locally-produced plants and animals.  
  Address School of Medicine, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW, 2522, Australia. karenc@uow.edu.au. School of Health and Society, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW, 2522, Australia. Australian National Centre for Ocean Resources and Security (ANCORS), University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW, 2522, Australia. Betty and Gordon Moore Center for Science and Oceans, Conservation International, Arlington, VA, 22202, USA.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2016/03/25  
  ISSN 1471-2458 (Electronic) 1471-2458 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Scopus, Web of Science and Medline searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1426 Serial 2885  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Chen, B.; Wang, C.; Wang, Y.M.; Liu, J.X. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effect of biotin on milk performance of dairy cattle: a meta-analysis Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Journal of Dairy Science Abbreviated Journal J Dairy Sci  
  Volume 94 Issue 7 Pages 3537-3546  
  Keywords Animals; Biotin/pharmacology; Cattle/physiology; Eating/drug effects; Female; Lactation/drug effects/physiology; Milk/chemistry/secretion; Vitamin B Complex/pharmacology; Cattle  
  Abstract A meta-analysis of the effect of biotin on production outcomes of dairy cattle was conducted following a literature review. A total of 11 studies from 9 papers, with information on the milk production and composition data from a total number of 238 cows were extracted and analyzed using meta-analysis software in Stata. Estimated size of effect of biotin was calculated for dry matter intake (DMI), milk production, and composition. Heterogeneity was not significant for all of the parameters (the highest I(2)=12%). Therefore, fixed effects models were used for analysis. With the addition of biotin to lactating dairy cattle, DMI and milk production increased by 0.87 and 1.66 kg/d. No significant effect on percentage of milk fat and milk protein was observed. Additionally, Begg's test indicated no evidence of substantial publication bias for all variables. The influence analysis shows that the removal of any study did not change the direction or significance of the point estimates. It can be concluded that the use of biotin supplements increases DMI and milk yield in lactating dairy cows.  
  Address Institute of Dairy Science, College of Animal Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029, P. R. China.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2011/06/28  
  ISSN 1525-3198 (Electronic) 0022-0302 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Web of Science, Ovid (?), ScienceDirect and Google Scholar searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 634 Serial 2374  
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Author (up) Chesney, C.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Systematic review of evidence for the prevalence of food sensitivity in dogs Type Journal Article
  Year 2001 Publication Veterinary Record Abbreviated Journal Vet Rec  
  Volume 148 Issue 14 Pages 445-448  
  Keywords Animal Feed/adverse effects; Animals; Clinical Trials as Topic/standards/veterinary; Dog Diseases/diet therapy/epidemiology; Dogs; Food Hypersensitivity/diet therapy/epidemiology/veterinary; Prevalence  
  Abstract Twelve papers giving original data on canine food sensitivity in an acceptable form were reviewed, and the disorder was confirmed in 390 dogs. Most of the papers did not give either the criteria by which dogs were included in a trial, or information about dogs which had undergone a trial with a restricted diet but in which food sensitivity had not been observed. Only one author indicated how the degree of pruritus of the dogs in the study was assessed. The question of owner compliance in conducting a diet trial was not considered in any of the papers. The best available evidence comes from three of the studies covering 534 dogs in total, of which 93 (17 per cent) suffered food sensitivity.  
  Address Mott Clinic, Beaumont House, Broadclyst, Exeter EX5 3JH.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2001/05/08  
  ISSN 0042-4900 (Print) 0042-4900 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes MEDLINE and CAB searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 635 Serial 2375  
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Author (up) Christensen, M.B.; Eriksen, T.; Kjelgaard-Hansen, M. doi  openurl
  Title C-reactive protein: quantitative marker of surgical trauma and post-surgical complications in dogs: a systematic review Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Acta Veterinaria Scandinavica Abbreviated Journal Acta Vet Scand  
  Volume 57 Issue Pages 71  
  Keywords Dogs; Canine; C-reactive protein  
  Abstract C-reactive protein (CRP) is a major acute phase protein showing increasing serum concentrations in dogs with systemic inflammation following e.g., surgery, trauma, infections, or neoplasia. CRP is a useful diagnostic marker of systemic inflammation in dogs and automated assays have been validated for reliable measurements for routine diagnostic purposes. In the present study available evidence for the use of CRP as a marker of surgery related systemic inflammation in dogs was reviewed and assessed. Two main themes were in focus: (1) canine CRP as a potential marker of postsurgical infectious complications and (2) canine CRP as a marker of the degree of surgical trauma. As outlined in the review several studies suggest that CRP is a useful marker for both purposes. However, the evidence level is limited and studies in the field are all affected by considerable risks of bias. Thus, further studies are needed in order to confirm the assumptions from previous studies and increase the level of evidence for CRP as a useful marker for detecting inflammation after surgery in dogs.  
  Address Department of Veterinary Clinical and Animal Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Dyrlaegevej 16, 1870, Frederiksberg C, Denmark. mic@sund.ku.dk. Department of Veterinary Clinical and Animal Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Dyrlaegevej 16, 1870, Frederiksberg C, Denmark. ter@sund.ku.dk. Novo Nordisk A/S, Novo Nordisk Park, 2760, Maaloev, Denmark. mdkh@novonordisk.com.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2015/10/21  
  ISSN 1751-0147 (Electronic) 0044-605X (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, Web of Science, Agris, and CAB Abstract searched Approved no  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1380 Serial 2847  
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Author (up) Christopher, M.M.; Marusic, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Geographic trends in research output and citations in veterinary medicine: insight into global research capacity, species specialization, and interdisciplinary relationships Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication BMC Veterinary Research Abbreviated Journal BMC Vet Res  
  Volume 9 Issue Pages 115  
  Keywords Veterinary research  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Bibliographic data can be used to map the research quality and productivity of a discipline. We hypothesized that bibliographic data would identify geographic differences in research capacity, species specialization, and interdisciplinary relationships within the veterinary profession that corresponded with demographic and economic indices. RESULTS: Using the SCImago portal, we retrieved veterinary journal, article, and citation data in the Scopus database by year (1996-2011), region, country, and publication in species-specific journals (food animal, small animal, equine, miscellaneous), as designated by Scopus. In 2011, Scopus indexed 165 journals in the veterinary subject area, an increase from 111 in 1996. As a percentage of veterinary research output between 1996 and 2010, Western Europe and North America (US and Canada) together accounted for 60.9% of articles and 73.0% of citations. The number of veterinary articles increased from 8815 in 1996 to 19,077 in 2010 (net increase 66.6%). During this time, publications increased by 21.0% in Asia, 17.2% in Western Europe, and 17.0% in Latin America, led by Brazil, China, India, and Turkey. The United States had the highest number of articles in species-specific journals. As a percentage of regional output, the proportion of articles in small animal and equine journals was highest in North America and the proportion of articles in food animal journals was highest in Africa. Based on principal component analysis, total articles were highly correlated with gross domestic product (based on World Bank data). The proportion of articles in small animal and equine journals was associated with gross national income, research and development, and % urban population, as opposed to the proportion of food animal articles, agricultural output, and % rural population. Co-citations linked veterinary medicine with medicine in the United States, with basic sciences in Eastern Europe and the Far East, and with agriculture in most other regions and countries. CONCLUSIONS: Bibliographic data reflect the demographic changes affecting veterinary medicine worldwide and provide insight into current and changing global research capacity, specialization, and interdisciplinary affiliations. A more detailed analysis of species-specific trends is warranted and could contribute to a better understanding of educational and workforce needs in veterinary medicine.  
  Address School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, One Shields Ave, Davis, CA 95616, USA. mmchristopher@ucdavis.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2013/06/14  
  ISSN 1746-6148 (Electronic) 1746-6148 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Scopus searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1155 Serial 2376  
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Author (up) Clark, B.; Frewer, L.J.; Panzone, L.A.; Stewart, G.B. doi  openurl
  Title The Need for Formal Evidence Synthesis in Food Policy: A Case Study of Willingness-to-Pay Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Animals (Basel) Abbreviated Journal Animals (Basel)  
  Volume 7 Issue 3 Pages  
  Keywords Cows; cattle; Bovine; Sheep; Ovine; Farm animal welfare; Willingness to pay  
  Abstract Meta-analysis is increasingly utilised in the understanding of consumer behaviour, including in relation to farm animal welfare. However, the issue of publication bias has received little attention. As willingness-to-pay (WTP) is widely used in policy, it is important to explore publication bias. This research aimed to evaluate publication bias in WTP, specifically public WTP for farm animal welfare. A systematic review of four databases yielded 54 studies for random effects meta-analysis. Publication bias was assessed by the Egger test, rank test, contour-enhanced funnel plots, and the Vevea and Hedges weight-function model. Results consistently indicated the presence of publication bias, highlighting an overestimation of WTP for farm animal welfare. Stakeholders should be wary of WTP estimates that have not been critically evaluated for publication bias.  
  Address School of Agriculture Food and Rural Development, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU, UK. b.clark@newcastle.ac.uk. School of Agriculture Food and Rural Development, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU, UK. lynn.frewer@newcastle.ac.uk. School of Agriculture Food and Rural Development, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU, UK. luca.panzone@newcastle.ac.uk. School of Agriculture Food and Rural Development, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU, UK. gavin.stewart@newcastle.ac.uk.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2017/03/14  
  ISSN 2076-2615 (Print) 2076-2615 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Scopus, ISI Web of Knowledge, AgEcon Search, and Google Scholar,. Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1451 Serial 2907  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Clausen, J.; Albrecht, H.; Mathie, R.T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Veterinary clinical research database for homeopathy: placebo-controlled trials Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Complementary Therapies in Medicine Abbreviated Journal Complement Ther Med  
  Volume 21 Issue 2 Pages 115-120  
  Keywords Animals; Biomedical Research; Clinical Trials as Topic/methods; Clinical Trials as Topic/veterinary; Databases, Factual; Homeopathy/veterinary; Hospitals, Animal; Placebo Effect; Placebos/administration & dosage; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic/methods; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic/veterinary; Research Design; Placebos; Homeopathy; Cattle; Horses; Pigs; Swine; Dogs; Sheep; Chickens; Goats; Rabbits  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Veterinary homeopathy has led a somewhat shadowy existence since its first introduction. Only in the last three decades has the number of clinical trials increased considerably. This literature is generally not well perceived, which may be partly a consequence of the diffuse and somewhat inaccessible nature of some of the relevant research publications. The Veterinary Clinical Research Database for Homeopathy (VetCR) was launched in 2006 to provide information on existing clinical research in veterinary homeopathy and to facilitate the preparation of systematic reviews. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present report is to provide an overview of this first database on clinical research in veterinary homeopathy, with a special focus on its content of placebo controlled clinical trials and summarising what is known about placebo effects in animals. RESULTS: In April 2012, the VetCR database contained 302 data records. Among these, 203 controlled trials were identified: 146 randomised and 57 non-randomised. In 97 of those 203 trials, the homeopathic medical intervention was compared to placebo. COMMENT: A program of formal systematic reviews of peer-reviewed randomised controlled trials in veterinary homeopathy is now underway; detailed findings from the program's data extraction and appraisal approach, including the assessment of trial quality (risk of bias), will be reported in due course.  
  Address Karl und Veronica Carstens-Stiftung, Am Deimelsberg 36, 45276 Essen, Germany. info@Carstens-Stiftung.de  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2013/03/19  
  ISSN 1873-6963 (Electronic) 0965-2299 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 891 Serial 2377  
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Author (up) Coe, J.B.; Young, I.; Lambert, K.; Dysart, L.; Nogueira Borden, L.; Rajic, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A scoping review of published research on the relinquishment of companion animals Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Journal of Applied Animal Welfare Science : JAAWS Abbreviated Journal J Appl Anim Welf Sci  
  Volume 17 Issue 3 Pages 253-73  
  Keywords Animals; Behavior, Animal; Humans; Pets/psychology; Research/statistics & numerical data; Dogs; Cats  
  Abstract Globally, large populations of companion animals are relinquished each year. The purpose of this scoping review was to identify all published research investigating companion-animal relinquishment to map out and evaluate research gaps, needs, and opportunities. A comprehensive search strategy was implemented in 4 online databases, identified citations were screened, and relevant articles were procured and characterized. From 6,848 unique citations identified, 192 were confirmed relevant, including 115 primary-research articles and 77 reviews and commentaries. The majority of these articles originated from the United States (131; 68.2%); 74 (38.5%) of them have been published since 2006. Among the primary-research articles, 84 (73.0%) investigated reasons for companion-animal relinquishment. The most commonly studied reasons were aggressive companion-animal behaviors (49; 58.3%); moving, rental, or housing issues (45; 53.6%); and caretaker personal issues (42; 50.0%). Only 17 primary-research articles investigated interventions to prevent companion-animal relinquishment. The quantity of research into reasons for relinquishment highlights an opportunity for future knowledge-synthesis activities in this area, including systematic review and meta-analysis. In comparison, the limited research into interventions identifies a priority for new research.  
  Address Department of Population Medicine , University of Guelph , Ontario , Canada.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2014/04/18  
  ISSN 1532-7604 (Electronic) 1088-8705 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes MEDLINE, Scopus, CAB Direct (CAB Abstracts?) and PsychINFO searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1218 Serial 2708  
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Author (up) Collins, S.A.; Overland, M.; Skrede, A.; Drew, M.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effect of plant protein sources on growth rate in salmonids: meta-analysis of dietary inclusion of soybean, pea and canola/rapeseed meals and protein concentrates Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Aquaculture Abbreviated Journal Aquaculture  
  Volume 400 Issue 401 Pages 85-100  
  Keywords Animal Nutrition (General) [LL500]; Forage and Feed Products (Non-human) [RR000]; Aquaculture (Animals) [MM120]; Field Crops [FF005]; animal feeding; aquaculture; aquatic animals; aquatic organisms; composition; concentrates; data analysis; diets; feeding; feeds; growth rate; meal; meta-analysis; oilmeals; pea meal; plant protein; protein concentrates; protein sources; rapeseed; rapeseed oilmeal; research; soya protein; soyabean oilmeal; soyabeans; Glycine (Fabaceae); Salmonidae; Salmoniformes; Osteichthyes; fishes; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; eukaryotes; Papilionoideae; Fabaceae; Fabales; dicotyledons; angiosperms; Spermatophyta; plants; aquatic species; feeding stuffs; protein feeds; soy protein; soyabean protein; soybean oilmeal; soybean protein; soybeans; studies; vegetable protein; [Indexed using CAB Thesaurus terms]  
  Abstract Six parallel meta-analyses were conducted to determine the effect of the dietary inclusion rate of pea meal (PM), pea protein concentrate (PPC), soybean meal (SBM), soy protein concentrate (SPC), canola/rapeseed meal (CM) and canola/rapeseed protein concentrate (CPC) on the specific growth rate (SGR) of salmonid fish. From 1794 growth studies involving the feeding of these six test ingredients to salmonid fish, 45 studies were selected for inclusion in the meta-analysis. The relationship between SGR and the dietary inclusion level of plant-based feed ingredients was calculated using Cohen's d (CD), which measures differences between control and experimental means. The results of these meta-analyses showed an increase in the dietary inclusion of SBM, SPC, CM and CPC (not PM or PPC) leads to a significant reduction in SGR. Weighted regressions of inclusion level for each test ingredient on effect size showed significant, negative linear relationships between SGR and dietary inclusions of SBM, SPC, CM and CPC. For PM and PPC, there was no significant relationship between SGR and inclusion rate. The results suggest that the effect of plant ingredients on growth performance of salmonids depends on the specific ingredients and their inclusion levels. The higher effect sizes observed when ingredients are fed at lower inclusion levels and lack of significant impact of feeding mixed diets suggest that feeding low levels of several ingredients might be beneficial.  
  Address Department of Animal and Poultry Science, University of Saskatchewan, 51 Campus Drive, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 5A8, Canada. murray.drew@usask.ca  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0044-8486 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Web of Knowledge (Web of Science?) and SCIRUS searched. Database record copyright CAB International 2010 Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1109 Serial 2378  
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Author (up) Conan, A.; Goutard, F.L.; Sorn, S.; Vong, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Biosecurity measures for backyard poultry in developing countries: a systematic review Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication BMC Veterinary Research Abbreviated Journal BMC Vet Res  
  Volume 8 Issue Pages 240  
  Keywords Animal Husbandry/methods; Animals; Developing Countries; Poultry; Poultry Diseases/prevention & control; Chickens  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Poultry represents an important sector in animal production, with backyard flocks representing a huge majority, especially in the developing countries. In these countries, villagers raise poultry to meet household food demands and as additional sources of incomes. Backyard production methods imply low biosecurity measures and high risk of infectious diseases, such as Newcastle disease or zoonosis such as Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI).We reviewed literature on biosecurity practices for prevention of infectious diseases, and published recommendations for backyard poultry and assessed evidence of their impact and feasibility, particularly in developing countries. Documents were sourced from the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) website, and from Pubmed and Google databases. RESULTS: A total of 62 peer-reviewed and non-referred documents were found, most of which were published recently (after 2004) and focused on HPAI/H5N1-related biosecurity measures (64%). Recommendations addressed measures for flock management, feed and water management, poultry trade and stock change, poultry health management and the risk to humans. Only one general guideline was found for backyard poultry-related biosecurity; the other documents were drawn up for specific developing settings and only engaged their authors (e.g. consultants). These national guidelines written by consultants generated recommendations regarding measures derived from the highest standards of commercial poultry production. Although biosecurity principles of isolation and containment are described in most documents, only a few documents were found on the impact of measures in family poultry settings and none gave any evidence of their feasibility and effectiveness for backyard poultry. CONCLUSIONS: Given the persistent threat posed by HPAI/H5N1 to humans in developing countries, our findings highlight the importance of encouraging applied research toward identifying sustained and adapted biosecurity measures for smallholder poultry flocks in low-income countries.  
  Address Epidemiology and Public Health Unit, Institut Pasteur du Cambodge, Reseau International des Instituts Pasteur, Phnom Penh, Cambodia. aconan@hotmail.fr  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2012/12/12  
  ISSN 1746-6148 (Electronic) 1746-6148 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed and Google searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1105 Serial 2379  
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Author (up) Constable, P.D.; Nouri, M.; Sen, I.; Baird, A.N.; Wittek, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evidence-based use of prokinetic drugs for abomasal disorders in cattle Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Veterinary Clinics of North America. Food Animal Practice Abbreviated Journal Vet Clin North Am Food Anim Pract  
  Volume 28 Issue 1 Pages 51-70, viii  
  Keywords Abomasum; Animals; Cattle; Cattle Diseases/drug therapy; Erythromycin/therapeutic use; Gastric Emptying/drug effects; Gastrointestinal Agents/therapeutic use; Stomach Diseases/drug therapy/veterinary  
  Abstract Abomasal hypomotility is a prerequisite for abomasal displacement in cattle and is present immediately after surgical correction of left displaced abomasum or abomasal volvulus. Hypocalcemia, hypokalemia, and hyperinsulinemia should be corrected in cattle suspected to have abomasal hypomotility. The most effective prokinetic for calves and adult cattle suspected to have abomasal hypomotility is erythromycin.  
  Address Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Purdue University, 625 Harrison Street, West Lafayette, IN 47905-2026, USA. constabl@purdue.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2012/03/01  
  ISSN 1558-4240 (Electronic) 0749-0720 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes CAB, MEDLINE and Google Scholar searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 542 Serial 2380  
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Author (up) Constable, P.D.; Shanks, R.D.; Huhn, J.; Morin, D.E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evaluation of breed as a risk factor for atresia coli in cattle Type Journal Article
  Year 1997 Publication Theriogenology Abbreviated Journal Theriogenology  
  Volume 48 Issue 5 Pages 775-790  
  Keywords Cattle; Intestinal Atresia  
  Abstract Systematic review of published cases and a hospital-based case-control study were completed to evaluate breed as a risk factor for atresia coli in cattle. Systematic review of 37 published studies indicated that atresia coli has been diagnosed in 10 cattle breeds and 12 countries, with the marked preponderance of cases occurring in Holstein-Friesian calves (485/514 cases, 94%). Epidemiologic analysis based on 28,373 cattle < 2 mo of age admitted to North American veterinary schools between 1964 and 1993 identified 291 cases of atresia coli in 13 breeds, with the marked preponderance of cases occurring in Holstein-Friesian calves (228/291, 78%). Holstein-Friesian cattle were at significantly greater risk for the condition than all other dairy cattle breeds (crude odds ratio 4.55, P < 0.0001) and all other cattle breeds (crude odds ratio 7.12, P < 0.0001), whereas there was no difference in the odds ratio between dairy cattle (not Holstein-Friesian) and beef cattle (crude odds ratio 1.68, P = 0.11). Atresia coli probably occurs secondary to vascular insufficiency of the developing colon. Holstein-Friesian cattle may be genetically predisposed to atresia coli, possibly because their developing colon grows at a faster rate and/or to a greater extent than that in other cattle breeds. Early or vigorous palpation per rectum of the amniotic vesicle appears to increase the risk of atresia coli in a genetically predisposed fetus, probably through palpation-induced damage to the developing colonic vasculature.  
  Address Department of Veterinary Clinical Medicine University of Illinois Urbana, IL 61802 USA.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2006/05/27  
  ISSN 0093-691X (Print) 0093-691X (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes CAB (Abstracts?) searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 637 Serial 2381  
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Author (up) Cook, J.L.; Cook, C.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title What is the evidence? Intervertebral disk surgery Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association Abbreviated Journal J Am Vet Med Assoc  
  Volume 237 Issue 1 Pages 49-51  
  Keywords Animals; Decompression, Surgical/veterinary; Dog Diseases/diagnosis; Dogs; Intervertebral Disc Displacement/surgery/veterinary; Male; Spinal Fusion/veterinary  
  Abstract  
  Address Comparative Orthopaedic Laboratory, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211, USA. cookjl@missouri.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2010/07/02  
  ISSN 0003-1488 (Print) 0003-1488 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 440 Serial 2383  
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Author (up) Cook, J.L.; Cook, C.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title What is the evidence? Forelimb lameness in a dog--evidence-based decision making Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association Abbreviated Journal J Am Vet Med Assoc  
  Volume 235 Issue 9 Pages 1053-1055  
  Keywords Animals; Arthroscopy/veterinary; Dog Diseases/diagnosis/surgery; Dogs; Evidence-Based Medicine; Forelimb/pathology; Fractures, Bone/diagnosis/surgery/veterinary; Lameness, Animal/diagnosis; Male  
  Abstract  
  Address Comparative Orthopaedic Laboratory, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211, USA. cookjl@missouri.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2009/11/03  
  ISSN 0003-1488 (Print) 0003-1488 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 439 Serial 2382  
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Author (up) Corino, C.; Rossi, R.; Cannata, S.; Ratti, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effect of dietary linseed on the nutritional value and quality of pork and pork products: systematic review and meta-analysis Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Meat science Abbreviated Journal Meat Sci  
  Volume 98 Issue 4 Pages 679-88  
  Keywords Pigs; Pork; Swine; Nutrition  
  Abstract Nutritional quality of pork is a significant factor for consumers' health. Feeding n-3 PUFA to pigs, using linseed, improves pork nutritional quality. A meta-analysis involving 1006 pigs reported in 24 publications was carried out to assess the effects of dietary linseed on alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) content in muscle and adipose tissue. Data showed positive effects of n-3 PUFA on muscle fatty acid composition: ALA+137%, EPA+188%, DPA+51% and DHA+12%. Same results were observed in adipose tissue: ALA+297%, EPA+149%, DPA+88% and DHA+18%. A positive correlation between dietary treatment and ALA and EPA content in muscle (P<0.001) and adipose tissue (P=0.036) was observed. A significant association between DPA (P=0.04) and DHA (P=0.011) and live weight in muscle was observed. Feeding linseed to pig improves the nutritional pork quality, raising the n-3 PUFA content in muscle and adipose tissue.  
  Address Universita degli Studi di Milano, Department of Health, Animal Science and Food Safety, Via Celoria 10, 20133 Milan, Italy. Universita degli Studi di Milano, Department of Health, Animal Science and Food Safety, Via Celoria 10, 20133 Milan, Italy. Electronic address: sabrina.ratti@unimi.it.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2014/08/05  
  ISSN 1873-4138 (Electronic) 0309-1740 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes CAB Abstracts searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1276 Serial 2763  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Cortinovis, C.; Pizzo, F.; Caloni, F. doi  openurl
  Title Poisoning of dogs and cats by drugs intended for human use Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Veterinary Journal (London, England : 1997) Abbreviated Journal Vet J  
  Volume 203 Issue 1 Pages 52-58  
  Keywords Cats; Dogs; [Indexed using CAB Thesaurus terms]  
  Abstract One of the main causes of poisoning of small animals is exposure to drugs intended for human use. Poisoning may result from misuse by pet owners, off-label use of medicines or, more frequently, accidental ingestion of drugs that are improperly stored. This review focuses on classes of drugs intended for human use that are most commonly involved in the poisoning of small animals and provides an overview of poisoning episodes reported in the literature. To perform this review a comprehensive search of public databases (PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, Google Scholar) using key search terms was conducted. Additionally, relevant textbooks and reference lists of articles pertaining to the topic were reviewed to locate additional related articles. Most published information on small animal poisoning by drugs intended for human use was from animal and human poison control centres or from single case reports. The dog was the species most frequently poisoned. The major drugs involved included analgesics (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs), antihistamines (H1-antihistamines), cardiovascular drugs (calcium channel blockers), central nervous system drugs (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, baclofen, benzodiazepines and zolpidem), gastrointestinal drugs (loperamide), nutritional supplements (vitamin D and iron salts) and respiratory drugs (beta2-adrenergic receptor agonists).  
  Address Department of Health, Animal Science and Food Safety (VESPA), Universita degli Studi di Milano, Via Celoria 10, 20133 Milan, Italy. Department of Health, Animal Science and Food Safety (VESPA), Universita degli Studi di Milano, Via Celoria 10, 20133 Milan, Italy. Electronic address: francesca.caloni@unimi.it.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2014/12/06  
  ISSN 1532-2971 (Electronic) 1090-0233 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus and Google Scholar searched. Database record copyright of CAB International 2010. Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1347 Serial 2820  
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Author (up) Counotte, M.J.; Minbaeva, G.; Usubalieva, J.; Abdykerimov, K.; Torgerson, P.R. doi  openurl
  Title The Burden of Zoonoses in Kyrgyzstan: A Systematic Review Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases Abbreviated Journal PLoS Negl Trop Dis  
  Volume 10 Issue 7 Pages e0004831  
  Keywords Kyrgyzstan; Zoonoses  
  Abstract INTRODUCTION: Zoonotic disease (ZD) pose a serious threat to human health in low-income countries. In these countries the human burden of disease is often underestimated due to insufficient monitoring because of insufficient funding. Quantification of the impact of zoonoses helps in prioritizing healthcare needs. Kyrgyzstan is a poor, mountainous country with 48% of the population employed in agriculture and one third of the population living below the poverty line. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have assessed the burden of zoonoses in Kyrgyzstan by conducting a systematic review. We have used the collected data to estimate the burden of ZDs and addressed the underestimation in officially reported disease incidence. The estimated incidences of the ZDs were used to calculate incidence-based Disability Adjusted Life Years (DALYs). This standardized health gap measure enhances comparability between injuries and diseases. The combined burden for alveolar echinococcosis, cystic echinococcosis, brucellosis, campylobacteriosis, congenital toxoplasmosis, non-typhoidal salmonellosis and rabies in Kyrgyzstan in 2013 was 35,209 DALYs [95% Uncertainty interval (UI):13,413-83,777]; 576 deaths [95% UI: 279-1,168] were attributed to these infections. We estimate a combined median incidence of ZDs of 141,583 cases [95% UI: 33,912-250,924] in 2013. The highest burden was caused by non-typhoidal Salmonella and Echinococcus multilocularis, respectively 14,792 DALYs [95% UI: 3,966-41,532] and 11,915 DALYs [95% UI: 4,705-27,114] per year. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The health impact of zoonoses in Kyrgyzstan is substantial, comparable to that of HIV. Community-based surveillance studies and hospital-based registration of all occurrences of zoonoses would increase the accuracy of the estimates.  
  Address Section of Epidemiology, Vetsuisse Faculty, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland. Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands. State Sanitary Epidemiological Department of the Kyrgyz Republic, Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan. Laboratory “Express Plus”, Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2016/07/09  
  ISSN 1935-2735 (Electronic) 1935-2727 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, Google Scholar, Web of Science, OVID, Scopus, the WHO Global Health Library, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and ProMED-mail and Google Scholar were searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1443 Serial 2891  
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Author (up) Cozzi, B.; Spagnoli, S.; Bruno, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title An overview of the central nervous system of the elephant through a critical appraisal of the literature published in the XIX and XX centuries Type Journal Article
  Year 2001 Publication Brain Research Bulletin Abbreviated Journal Brain Res Bull  
  Volume 54 Issue 2 Pages 219-227  
  Keywords Animals; Brain/anatomy & histology/cytology; Central Nervous System/anatomy & histology/physiology; Cerebellum/anatomy & histology/cytology; Cerebral Cortex/anatomy & histology; Elephants/anatomy & histology/classification/physiology; Female; Organ Size; Parietal Lobe/anatomy & histology/cytology; Species Specificity; Spinal Cord/anatomy & histology; Elephants  
  Abstract The two species of elephants (Indian: Elephas maximus and African: Loxodonta africana) possess the largest brain among land mammals. Due to its size, the elephant brain is discussed in virtually every paper dealing with the evolution of the central nervous system of mammals and comparative brain size. Studies on the social habits of elephants also deal with the skills and the “intelligence” and brain size of these species. Yet most of the descriptions and conclusions reported in comparative studies rely on second-hand data derived from investigations performed several decades before, often dating as far back as the XIX century. Furthermore, many of the original papers actually describing gross and detailed features of the brain of elephants are either no longer available, are written in languages other than English, or are difficult to trace. The present study gives a short description of the anatomy of the central nervous system of elephants, with special attention to its distinctive features, reports all available literature on the subject, and briefly discusses its origins and rationale.  
  Address Department of Animal Science, University of Padua, Legnaro, Padua, Italy. lontano@ux1.unipd.it  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2001/03/29  
  ISSN 0361-9230 (Print) 0361-9230 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes MEDLINE, Current Contents and Zoological Record searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 441 Serial 2384  
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Author (up) Cunha, R.C.; Andreotti, R.; Garcia, M.V.; Aguirre Ade, A.; Leitao, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Calculation of the efficacy of vaccines against tick infestations on cattle Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Revista Brasileira de Parasitologia Veterinaria = Brazilian Journal of Veterinary Parasitology Abbreviated Journal Rev Bras Parasitol Vet  
  Volume 22 Issue 4 Pages 571-578  
  Keywords Cattle  
  Abstract Cattle ticks are responsible for great economic losses in cattle farming worldwide, and their main control method, chemicals, has been showing problems, whether resulting from the development of resistant strains of ticks or environmental contamination. Research studies directed toward developing vaccines against ticks are emerging. One way to evaluate those vaccines is to calculate the percentage of efficacy. The aim of this study was to analyze scientific publications archived in PubMed that used this method of assessment and discuss the main factors that may affect its calculation. Thus, 25 articles addressing this subject were selected. The percentage of efficacy was usually calculated in one of two ways, with one considering the reduced fertility of eggs and the other not. The latter method may underestimate the vaccine efficacy, and the most complete formula for calculating the efficacy reflects how much the vaccine actually affects the infestation. In our view, the use of the complete formula for calculating the percentage of efficacy is broader and more representative of the vaccine effect on the tick population.  
  Address Programa de Pos-graduacao em Ciencia Animal, Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso do Sul – UFMS, MS, Brasil, Programa de Pos-graduacao em Ciencia Animal, Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso do Sul – UFMS, MS, Brasil. Departamento de Sanidade Animal, Embrapa Gado de Corte, Empresa Brasileira de Pesquisa Agropecuaria – EMBRAPA, Campo GrandeMS, Brasil, Departamento de Sanidade Animal, Embrapa Gado de Corte, Empresa Brasileira de Pesquisa Agropecuaria – EMBRAPA, Campo Grande, MS, Brasil. Instituto de Investigacao Cientifica Tropical – IICT, Centro de Investigacao Interdisciplinar em Sanidade Animal – CIISA, Faculdade de Medicina Veterinaria, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa – UTL, Lisboa, Portugal, Instituto de Investigacao Cientifica Tropical – IICT, Centro de Investigacao Interdisciplinar em Sanidade Animal – CIISA, Faculdade de Medicina Veterinaria, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa – UTL, Lisboa, Portugal.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2014/01/30  
  ISSN 1984-2961 (Electronic) 0103-846X (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1185 Serial 2679  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Cusack, P.; McMeniman, N.; Rabiee, A.; Lean, I. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Assessment of the effects of supplementation with vitamin E on health and production of feedlot cattle using meta-analysis Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication Preventive Veterinary Medicine Abbreviated Journal Prev Vet Med  
  Volume 88 Issue 4 Pages 229-246  
  Keywords Animals; Antioxidants/administration & dosage; Cattle/growth & development/physiology; Dietary Supplements; Energy Intake/drug effects/physiology; Nutritional Requirements; Nutritional Status; Oxidative Stress/drug effects; Vitamin E/administration & dosage; Weight Gain/drug effects/physiology; Cattle  
  Abstract Delivery of supplemental antioxidant vitamins to cattle placed in feedlots might be expected to improve health and performance outcomes by reducing the effects of oxidative stress to which these cattle are presumably exposed. Meta-analytic procedures were used in this study to assess published experiments on the effects of vitamin E supplementation in feedlot cattle. The health outcome of morbidity, and the production outcomes of average daily gain (ADG) and gain to feed ratio (G:F), were analysed. The currently available data do not support the use of supplemental vitamin E administered as an injection (morbidity risk ratio=1.17; P=0.17). The authors conclude that supplemental dietary vitamin E should be fed within the [NRC, 1996. National Research Council. Nutrient Requirements of Beef Cattle, 7th ed. Natl. Acad. Press, Washington, DC] recommended range.  
  Address Australian Livestock Production Services, 102 Darling St., Cowra, NSW 2794, Australia. pcusack@nexon.com.au  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2009/01/27  
  ISSN 0167-5877 (Print) 0167-5877 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes CAB, AGRICOLA and Biological Abstracts searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 641 Serial 2385  
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