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Author (up) Abdi, R.D.; Agga, G.E.; Aregawi, W.G.; Bekana, M.; Van Leeuwen, T.; Delespaux, V.; Duchateau, L. doi  openurl
  Title A systematic review and meta-analysis of trypanosome prevalence in tsetse flies Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication BMC Veterinary Research Abbreviated Journal BMC Vet Res  
  Volume 13 Issue 1 Pages 100  
  Keywords Trypanosoma; Tsetse Flies  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: The optimisation of trypanosomosis control programs warrants a good knowledge of the main vector of animal and human trypanosomes in sub-Saharan Africa, the tsetse fly. An important aspect of the tsetse fly population is its trypanosome infection prevalence, as it determines the intensity of the transmission of the parasite by the vector. We therefore conducted a systematic review of published studies documenting trypanosome infection prevalence from field surveys or from laboratory experiments under controlled conditions. Publications were screened in the Web of Science, PubMed and Google Scholar databases. Using the four-stage (identification, screening, eligibility and inclusion) process in the PRISMA statement the initial screened total of 605 studies were reduced to 72 studies. The microscopic examination of dissected flies (dissection method) remains the most used method to detect trypanosomes and thus constituted the main focus of this analysis. Meta-regression was performed to identify factors responsible for high trypanosome prevalence in the vectors and a random effects meta-analysis was used to report the sensitivity of molecular and serological tests using the dissection method as gold standard. RESULTS: The overall pooled prevalence was 10.3% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 8.1%, 12.4%) and 31.0% (95% CI = 20.0%, 42.0%) for the field survey and laboratory experiment data respectively. The country and the year of publication were found to be significantly factors associated with the prevalence of trypanosome infection in tsetse flies. The alternative diagnostic tools applied to dissection positive samples were characterised by low sensitivity, and no information on the specificity was available at all. CONCLUSION: Both temporal and spatial variation in trypanosome infection prevalence of field collected tsetse flies exists, but further investigation on real risk factors is needed how this variation can be explained. Improving the sensitivity and determining the specificity of these alternative diagnostic tools should be a priority and will allow to estimate the prevalence of trypanosome infection in tsetse flies in high-throughput.  
  Address Department of Clinical studies, College of Veterinary Medicine and Agriculture, Addis Ababa University, Bishoftu, Oromia, Ethiopia. retaduguma@gmail.com. Department of Animal Science, Institute of Agriculture, University of Tennessee, 2506 River Drive, Knoxville, USA. retaduguma@gmail.com. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Food Animal Environmental Systems Research Unit, Bowling Green, Kentucky, USA. Werer Agricultural Research Center, Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research, Afar, Ethiopia. Department of Clinical studies, College of Veterinary Medicine and Agriculture, Addis Ababa University, Bishoftu, Oromia, Ethiopia. Department of Crop Protection, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Gent University, Ghent, Belgium. Faculty of Sciences and Bioengineering Sciences, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium. Department of Comparative Physiology and Biometrics, Faculty of Veterinary Sciences, Gent University, Ghent, Belgium.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2017/04/14  
  ISSN 1746-6148 (Electronic) 1746-6148 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Web of Science, PubMed and Google Schola Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1446 Serial 2903  
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Author (up) Abell, K.M.; Theurer, M.E.; Larson, R.L.; White, B.J.; Apley, M. doi  openurl
  Title A mixed treatment comparison meta-analysis of metaphylaxis treatments for bovine respiratory disease in beef cattle Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Animal Science Abbreviated Journal J Anim Sci  
  Volume 95 Issue 2 Pages 626-635  
  Keywords Cattle: Cows; Calves; Bovine; Respiratory diseases; Antimicrobials  
  Abstract The objective of this project was to evaluate the effects of antimicrobials approved for parenteral metaphylactic use in feeder and stocker calves on morbidity and mortality for bovine respiratory disease with the use of a mixed treatment comparison meta-analysis. An initial literature review was conducted in April 2016 through Pubmed, Agricola, and CAB (Commonwealth Agricultural Bureau) for randomized controlled trials for metaphylaxis antimicrobial administered parentally to incoming feedlot or stocker calves within 48 h of arrival. The final list of publications included 29 studies, with a total of 37 trials. There were 8 different metaphylactic antimicrobials. Final event outcomes were categorized into bovine respiratory disease (BRD) morbidity cumulative incidence d 1 to </= 60 of the feeding period, BRD morbidity cumulative incidence d 1 to closeout of the feeding period, BRD mortality cumulative incidence d 1 to closeout of the feeding period, and BRD retreatment cumulative incidence morbidity d 1 to closeout of the feeding period. Network meta-analysis combined direct and indirect evidence for all the event outcomes to determine mean odds ratio (OR) with 95% credibility intervals (CrIs) for all metaphylactic antimicrobial comparisons. The “upper tier” treatment arms for morbidity d 1 to </= 60 included tulathromycin, gamithromycin, and tilmicosin. For BRD mortality cumulative incidence d 1 to closeout and BRD retreatment morbidity d 1 to closeout, classifying the treatment arms into tiers was not possible due to overlapping 95% CrIs. The results of this project accurately identified differences between metaphylactic antimicrobials, and metaphylactic antimicrobial options appear to offer different outcomes on BRD morbidity and mortality odds in feedlot cattle.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2017/04/06  
  ISSN 1525-3163 (Electronic) 0021-8812 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Pubmed, Agricola, and CAB searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1448 Serial 2904  
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Author (up) Abrahao, R.M.C.M.; Nogueira, P.A.; Malucelli, M.I.C. url  openurl
  Title [Meat and milk black market – bovine tuberculosis] Type Journal Article
  Year 2005 Publication Archives of Veterinary Science Abbreviated Journal Arch Vet Sci  
  Volume 10 Issue 2 Pages 1-17  
  Keywords Milk and Dairy Produce [QQ010]; Meat Produce [QQ030]; Food Contamination, Residues and Toxicology [QQ200]; Prion, Viral, Bacterial and Fungal Pathogens of Humans [VV210]; beef; disease transmission; food contamination; food hygiene; food safety; meat hygiene; milk; milk hygiene; reviews; zoonoses; Mycobacterium bovis; Brazil; Sao Paulo; Mycobacterium; Mycobacteriaceae; Firmicutes; bacteria; prokaryotes; South America; America; Developing Countries; Threshold Countries; Latin America; bovine tuberculosis; food contaminants; zoonotic infections; cattle; [Indexed using CAB Thesaurus terms]  
  Abstract The contaminated meat and milk of cattle can transmit several diseases, like bovine tuberculosis, to humans. These diseases are usually zoonotic and occur worldwide causing losses in cattle farms and risking the health of the consumers. The purpose of this study was to determine the magnitude of the meat and milk black market in Brazil. A bibliographical review of national and international publications was carried out by consulting Acervo, Higeia, Dedalus, Medline, Lilacs and Cab-abstract databases, besides the internet and newspaper articles. In this study, the aspects concerning the importance of tuberculosis caused by Mycobacterium bovis in man and animals is approached since its magnitude is still unknown in Brazil. It was observed that the meat and milk black markets needs urgent adoption of sanitary measures since they are one of causes of the public health problems in the country.  
  Address Departamento de Epidemiologia, Faculdade de Saude Publica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil. remabra@usp.br  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Portuguese Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1517-784x ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Acervo, Higeia, Dedalus, MEDLINE, LILACS and CAB Abstracts searched. Database record copyright CAB International 2010 Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 282 Serial 2327  
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Author (up) Aceto, H.; Miller, S.A.; Smith, G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Onset of diarrhea and pyrexia and time to detection of Salmonella enterica subsp enterica in feces in experimental studies of cattle, horses, goats, and sheep after infection per os Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association Abbreviated Journal J Am Vet Med Assoc  
  Volume 238 Issue 10 Pages 1333-1339  
  Keywords Animals; Diarrhea/microbiology/pathology/veterinary; Feces/microbiology; Fever/microbiology/pathology/veterinary; Salmonella Infections, Animal/microbiology/pathology; Salmonella enterica/physiology; Species Specificity; Cattle; Horses; Goats; Sheep  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To determine time to first detection of Salmonella organisms in feces of animals after experimental infection PO and times to onset of diarrhea and pyrexia to evaluate a common method for identifying nosocomial infections on the basis of time of admission and onset of clinical signs (ie, the 3-day criterion). DESIGN: Meta-analysis. SAMPLE POPULATION: Cattle, horses, goats, and sheep experimentally infected PO with Salmonella enterica subsp enterica. PROCEDURES: Online databases were searched for published reports describing results of experimental infection of cattle, horses, goats, and sheep PO with salmonellae. Time to detection of organisms in feces as well as to onset of diarrhea and pyrexia was noted. Analysis of covariance was used to examine relationships among these variables, host species and age, and Salmonella serovar and magnitude of infecting dose. RESULTS: Forty-three studies met the criteria for inclusion. Time to detection of salmonellae in feces ranged from 0.5 to 4 days. Times to onset of diarrhea and pyrexia ranged from 0.33 to 11 days and from 0.27 to 5 days, respectively. Time to onset of diarrhea was related to host age and Salmonella serovar. No other associations were identified. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Time to detection of salmonellae in feces is unreliable for identifying hospital-acquired infections; a 3-day criterion will misidentify hospital- versus community-acquired infections. Relying on clinical indices such as times to onset of diarrhea and pyrexia to trigger fecal sampling for detection of Salmonella infection will increase the risk of environmental contamination and nosocomial spread because animals may begin shedding organisms in feces several days prior.  
  Address Department of Clinical Studies, New Bolton Center, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Kennett Square, PA 19348, USA.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2011/05/17  
  ISSN 0003-1488 (Print) 0003-1488 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, MEDLINE, AGRICOLA, Biosis Previews and CAB Abstracts searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 607 Serial 2328  
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Author (up) Adell, A.D.; Miller, W.A.; Harvey, D.J.; Van Wormer, E.; Wuertz, S.; Conrad, P.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Individual subject meta-analysis of parameters for Giardia duodenalis shedding in animal experimental models Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication BioMed Research International Abbreviated Journal Biomed Res Int  
  Volume 2014 Issue Pages 476142  
  Keywords Cattle; Mice; Rodents; Rats; Dogs; Cats; Animals; Bacterial Shedding; Diarrhea/parasitology; Disease Models, Animal; Feces/parasitology; Giardia lamblia/pathogenicity; Giardiasis/epidemiology; Giardiasis/parasitology; Giardiasis/veterinary; Humans; Prevalence  
  Abstract Giardia duodenalis is a zoonotic protozoan parasite with public health importance worldwide. While articles about animal model infectivity have been published for G. duodenalis, the studies have used diverse protocols and parameters to evaluate the infectivity of this protozoan parasite. Hence, the objectives of this study were to (1) conduct a meta-analysis of published literature for cyst shedding and diarrhea outcomes in animal models and (2) develop recommendations to help standardize experimental dose response studies. Results showed that, for the outcome of cyst shedding in faeces, the covariates of infective stage (cyst versus trophozoite), Giardia dose, and the interactions between doses and infective stage, as well as dose and species of experimental host, were all significant (P value </= 0.05). This study suggests inoculation of the experimental host with cysts rather than trophozoites and administration of higher doses of Giardia will most likely result in cyst shedding. Based on the results of this meta-analysis, the infective stage (cyst versus trophozoite), parasite dose, and the interactions between dose and infective stage, as well as dose and species of experimental host, should be considered when designing experimental dose response studies that will assist in the study of zoonotic neglected tropical diseases globally.  
  Address Department of Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology, School of Veterinary Medicine, One Shields Avenue, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA ; Escuela de Medicina Veterinaria, Facultad de Ecologia y Recursos Naturales, Universidad Andres Bello, Republica 440, 8370251 Santiago, Chile. Department of Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology, School of Veterinary Medicine, One Shields Avenue, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA ; One Health Institute, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA. Department of Public Health Sciences, School of Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA. One Health Institute, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA. Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering, College of Engineering, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA ; Singapore Centre on Environmental Life Sciences Engineering (SCELSE), School of Biological Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 60 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637551 ; School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 60 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637551.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2014/05/07  
  ISSN 2314-6141 (Electronic) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed and Web of Science searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1227 Serial 2716  
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Author (up) Adell, A.D.; Miller, W.A.; Harvey, D.J.; Vanwormer, E.; Wuertz, S.; Conrad, P.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Individual subject meta-analysis of parameters for Cryptosporidium parvum shedding and diarrhoea in animal experimental models Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Epidemiology and Infection Abbreviated Journal Epidemiol Infect  
  Volume 141 Issue 8 Pages 1662-1678  
  Keywords Animals; Cryptosporidiosis/epidemiology; Cryptosporidiosis/parasitology; Cryptosporidium/physiology; Cryptosporidium parvum/physiology; Diarrhea/epidemiology; Diarrhea/parasitology; Disease Models, Animal; Feces/parasitology; Humans; Oocysts/physiology; Research Design/standards; Cattle; Pigs  
  Abstract SUMMARY Cryptosporidium is a zoonotic protozoan parasite with public health importance worldwide. The objectives of this study were to (1) conduct a meta-analysis of published literature for oocyst shedding and diarrhoea outcomes, and (2) develop recommendations for standardization of experimental dose-response studies. Results showed that for the outcome of oocyst shedding in faeces, the covariates 'experimental species', 'immunosuppression', 'oocyst dose' and 'oocyst dose' x 'age' were all significant (P 0.05). This study suggests that exposing mice, piglets, or ruminants, and using immunosuppressed experimental hosts, is more likely to result in oocyst shedding. For the outcome of diarrhoea in experimentally infected animal species, the key covariates 'experimental species', 'age' and 'immunosuppression' were significant (P 0.2). Therefore, based on the results of this meta-analysis, these variables should be carefully reported and considered when designing experimental dose-response studies. Additionally, detection of possible publication bias highlights the need to publish additional studies that convey statistically non-significant as well as significant results in the future.  
  Address Department of Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA, USA.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2012/10/17  
  ISSN 1469-4409 (Electronic) 0950-2688 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed and Web of Science searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 583 Serial 2329  
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Author (up) Adkin, A.; Hartnett, E.; Jordan, L.; Newell, D.; Davison, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Use of a systematic review to assist the development of Campylobacter control strategies in broilers Type Journal Article
  Year 2006 Publication Journal of Applied Microbiology Abbreviated Journal J Appl Microbiol  
  Volume 100 Issue 2 Pages 306-315  
  Keywords Animal Husbandry/methods; Animals; Campylobacter Infections/etiology/prevention & control/transmission; Chickens/microbiology; Food Microbiology; Housing, Animal; Poultry Diseases/prevention & control; Chickens  
  Abstract AIMS: Produce an evidence-based ranking of the major contributing factors and sources of Campylobacter occurrence in broilers produced in England, Scotland and Wales – Great Britain (GB). METHOD AND RESULTS: Relevant data were extracted from 159 research papers and findings were grouped into 14 sources of on-farm contamination and 37 contributing factors. A relevancy score was developed to take into account various measures from each study of applicability to GB broilers and strength of findings. Results indicate that major sources of Campylobacter include a depopulation event, another house on-farm, on-farm staff, and other animals on farm. The depopulation schedule (staggered slaughter) and multiple houses on-farm were identified as contributing factors associated with increasing the risk, and those decreasing the risk were use of a hygiene barrier, parent company and certain seasons of rearing. CONCLUSIONS: Although the review was more resource intensive compared to narrative studies, the system allows an increased level of transparency and the ability to investigate patterns and trends. SIGNIFICANCE AND IMPACT OF THE STUDY: This paper provides the first evidence-based ranking of the major sources and contributing factors for Campylobacter presence in broilers in GB using a systematic review.  
  Address Veterinary Laboratories Agency, Weybridge, UK. a.adkin@vla.defra.gsi.gov.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2006/01/25  
  ISSN 1364-5072 (Print) 1364-5072 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes CAB Abstracts, MEDLINE, VetCD, Web of Science, ISI Proceedings, ScienceDirect and Google searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 609 Serial 2330  
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Author (up) Aerni, V.; Brinkhof, M.W.G.; Wechsler, B.; Oester, H.; Frohlich, E. url  openurl
  Title Productivity and mortality of laying hens in aviaries: a systematic review Type Journal Article
  Year 2005 Publication World's Poultry Science Journal Abbreviated Journal World Poultry Sci J  
  Volume 61 Issue 1 Pages 130-142, 146, 150, 154, 159, 163  
  Keywords Egg Producing Animals [LL130]; Animal Husbandry and Production [LL180]; Animal Physiology and Biochemistry (Excluding Nutrition) [LL600]; Eggs and Egg Products [QQ040]; Food Composition and Quality [QQ500]; animal housing; aviaries; beak; cages; cannibalism; egg mass; egg weight; feed conversion efficiency; feed intake; hens; laying performance; mortality; poultry; productivity; reviews; strain differences; fowls; Gallus gallus; Gallus; Phasianidae; Galliformes; birds; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; eukaryotes; chickens; death rate; domesticated birds; laying characters; [Indexed using CAB Thesaurus terms]  
  Abstract A systematic review of investigations on productivity, mortality and cannibalism of laying hens housed in aviaries is presented. In Part One we reviewed the studies that compared these parameters between laying hens housed in aviaries and in conventional cages. In Part Two we investigated the relative impact of strain, beak trimming and rearing condition on productivity and mortality in aviaries. The comparative analysis revealed that aviary hens consumed 3.0% more food than caged hens, and food conversion was 6.7% higher in aviaries than in cages. On the other hand, the mortality rate and cannibalism rate did not differ significantly between the two housing systems. The analysis of causes of variation in productivity, mortality rate and cannibalism rate in aviaries revealed a strong effect of strain. Beak trimming was associated with a reduced prevalence of cannibalism rates but had no effect on overall mortality. It also reduced egg weight and food consumption. Early access to litter during the rearing period had a positive effect on egg weight; egg mass, food conversion and mortality rate. In conclusion, we found a slightly reduced productivity of aviaries in relation to cages although the mortality rates and the prevalence of cannibalism did not differ between these housing systems. To further improve productivity and reduce mortality of hens housed in aviaries we recommend the choice of suitable strains and the implementation of improved rearing conditions including early access to litter.  
  Address Bachlerenweg 20, CH-3044 Sariswil, Switzerland. vera.aerni@bluewin.ch  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0043-9339 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Web of Science searched. Database record copyright CAB International 2010 Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 285 Serial 2331  
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Author (up) Afanador-Villamizar, A.; Gomez-Romero, C.; Diaz, A.; Ruiz-Saenz, J. doi  openurl
  Title Avian influenza in Latin America: A systematic review of serological and molecular studies from 2000-2015 Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 12 Issue 6 Pages e0179573  
  Keywords Birds: Avian; Avian influenza; Virus; Poultry  
  Abstract Avian influenza or bird flu is a highly contagious acute viral disease that can occur in epidemics and cross-border forms in poultry and wild birds. The characteristics of avian influenza viruses (AIVs) allow the emergence of new viral variants, some with zoonotic and pandemic potential. AIVs have been identified in Latin America; however, there is a lack of understanding of these viruses at the regional level. We performed a systematic literature review on serological or molecular evidence of AIVs circulation in Latin America. Methods were designed based on the PRISMA and STROME guidelines. Only peer-reviewed studies published between 2000 to 2015 and data was analysed based on country, viral subtype, avian species, and phylogenetic origins. From 271 studies initially found only twenty-six met our inclusion criteria. Evidence of AIVs infection was found in most Latin American countries, with Mexico as the country with the largest number of conducted studies and reported cases during the period analysed, followed by Chile and Argentina. Most of the AIVs were early reported through surveillance systems and at least 14 different subtypes of influenza viruses were reported in birds, and the presence of both low (92.9%) and high (7.1%) pathogenic AIVs was shown in Latin America. Of the reported AIVs in Latin America, 43.7% belong to migratory birds, 28.1% to local wild birds, and 28.1% to poultry. The migratory bird population mainly comprises families belonging to the orders Anseriformes and Charadriformes. We highlight the importance of epidemiological surveillance systems and the possible role of different migratory birds in the transmission of AIVs within the Americas. Our findings demonstrate the limited information on AIVs in Latin America and highlight the need of more studies on AIVs at the regional level, particularly those focused on identifying the endemic subtypes in regional wild birds.  
  Address Semillero de Investigacion en enfermedades Infecciosas – InfeKto, Universidad Cooperativa de Colombia, Bucaramanga, Colombia. PIC – Pig Improvement Company LATAM, Queretaro, Mexico. Grupo de Investigacion en Ciencias Animales GRICA, Universidad Cooperativa de Colombia, Bucaramanga, Colombia.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2017/06/21  
  ISSN 1932-6203 (Electronic) 1932-6203 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes MedLine/PubMed and SciELO-Scientific Electronic Library Online searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1432 Serial 2887  
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Author (up) Agastin, A.; Sauvant, D.; Naves, M.; Boval, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Influence of trough versus pasture feeding on average daily gain and carcass characteristics in ruminants: a meta-analysis Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Journal of Animal Science Abbreviated Journal J Anim Sci  
  Volume 92 Issue 3 Pages 1173-83  
  Keywords Animal Husbandry/methods; Animals; Body Composition/physiology; Extinction, Biological; Female; Male; Ruminants/classification; Ruminants/physiology; Weight Gain/physiology; Cattle; Sheep; Goats; Ruminants  
  Abstract Quantitative meta-analysis was run on 108 publications featuring 116 experiments and 399 treatments dealing with the effect of trough or pasture feeding environment (FE) on ruminant performances. The objective was to compare the effect of trough or pasture FE on ADG, diet OM digestibility (OMD), various carcass characteristics, and the interaction between FE and complementation modalities. Liveweight was adjusted in order to compare results between species. Results showed that trough-fed animals had higher ADG (+17.89%, P<0.001), hot carcass yield (HYield, + 2.47%, P<0.001) and carcass fat content (+ 24.87%, P<0.001) than pasture-fed animals but lower carcass muscle and bone percentages (-1.60%, P=0.010 and -7.63%, P=0.003, respectively). Feeding environment had no effect on diet OMD (P=0.818), but the number of observations was low. After integrating added concentrate (addiCO), FE effect persisted on ADG (P=0.024) and carcass fat content (P=0.027) but not on HYield (P=0.078) or muscle and bone percentages (P=0.119 and P=0.581, respectively). After integrating nature of the concentrate (natCO), FE effect persisted on ADG (P<0.001) and HYield (P=0.004). Integrating percentage of concentrate (PCO) erased FE effect on ADG (P=0.891) and HYield (P=0.128). In contrast, integrating quantity of concentrate (QCO) erased FE effect on ADG (P=0.084) but not on HYield (P=0.006) or on carcass fat and muscle contents (P=0.040 and P=0.040, respectively), although the FE effect on carcass bone content persisted (P=0.550). Animal species and physiological stage had no effect on any of the variables studied (P>0.05), but experiment did (P</=0.001). The increase in ADG was positively correlated to HYield in cattle (P=0.002) and small ruminants (P=0.003) and positively linked to carcass fat content (P=0.007) but not carcass muscle content, which actually decreased (P=0.001). Overall, this meta-analysis confirmed previous reports of FE effects and revealed how the differences generally reported result from a confounding effect of FE and nature of the diet. Indeed, in most of the studies used, trough-fed animals were supplemented with concentrate whereas pasture-fed animals were not. This research also highlighted the fact that pasture-fed animals have the potential to achieve the same performances as trough-fed animals when fed a similar diet.  
  Address INRA, UR143, Unite de Recherches Zootechniques, Domaine Duclos, 97170 Petit-Bourg, Guadeloupe, French West Indies.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2014/02/05  
  ISSN 1525-3163 (Electronic) 0021-8812 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Web of Science and CABI (CAB Abstracts?) searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1200 Serial 2693  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Aghajafari, F.; Murphy, K.; Matthews, S.; Ohlsson, A.; Amankwah, K.; Hannah, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Repeated doses of antenatal corticosteroids in animals: a systematic review Type Journal Article
  Year 2002 Publication American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology Abbreviated Journal Am J Obstet Gynecol  
  Volume 186 Issue 4 Pages 843-849  
  Keywords Adrenal Cortex Hormones/administration & dosage/adverse effects; Animals; Behavior, Animal/drug effects; Betamethasone/administration & dosage/adverse effects; Birth Weight; Embryonic and Fetal Development/drug effects; Female; Fetal Growth Retardation/chemically induced; Fetal Organ Maturity; Haplorhini; Lung/embryology; Medline; Male; Mice; Placebos; Pregnancy; Rabbits; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Sheep  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this review was to assess the effects of repeated doses of antenatal corticosteroids on lung and brain function and on growth restriction in animals. STUDY DESIGN: MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched for randomized controlled trials that compared repeated doses of antenatal corticosteroids versus a single dose, with or without placebo, in pregnant animals. RESULTS: Nineteen studies were included. The animals that were studied included sheep, monkeys, rabbits, and mice. There were 8 studies that assessed the effects of repeated doses of antenatal corticosteroids on lung function. All the studies reported improvement in lung function after repeated doses of antenatal corticosteroids. Seven studies investigated the effects of repeated doses of antenatal corticosteroids on brain or nervous system function or growth; all the studies found adverse effects with repeated doses of antenatal corticosteroids. Eleven studies looked at the effect of repeated doses of antenatal corticosteroids on fetal growth. Nine studies found evidence of fetal growth restriction with repeated doses of antenatal corticosteroids. One study assessed long-term behavioral outcomes in mice and found no effect. CONCLUSION: Evidence from randomized controlled trials in animals suggests that repeated doses of antenatal corticosteroids may have beneficial effects in terms of lung function but may have adverse effects on brain function and fetal growth. Because of the differences between animals and humans, it is difficult to extrapolate directly the results of these studies to humans. Therefore, randomized controlled trials in humans are needed to assess the effects of repeated courses of antenatal corticosteroids for pregnant women who are at increased risk of preterm birth in terms of important perinatal, neonatal, and maternal outcomes.  
  Address Institute of Medical Sciences, Maternal, Infant and Reproductive Health Research Unit, Center for Research in Women's Health, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Center, University of Toronto, Ontario.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2002/04/23  
  ISSN 0002-9378 (Print) 0002-9378 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes MEDLINE and Embase searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 503 Serial 2332  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Agunos, A.; Waddell, L.; Leger, D.; Taboada, E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A systematic review characterizing on-farm sources of Campylobacter spp. for broiler chickens Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication PLoS One Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 9 Issue 8 Pages e104905  
  Keywords Chickens; Poultry; Broilers; Campylobacter Infections  
  Abstract Campylobacter and antimicrobial-resistant Campylobacter are frequently isolated from broiler chickens worldwide. In Canada, campylobacteriosis is the third leading cause of enteric disease and the regional emergence of ciprofloxacin-resistant Campylobacter in broiler chickens has raised a public health concern. This study aimed to identify, critically appraise, and synthesize literature on sources of Campylobacter in broilers at the farm level using systematic review methodology. Literature searches were conducted in January 2012 and included electronic searches in four bibliographic databases. Relevant studies in French or English (n = 95) conducted worldwide in any year and all study designs were included. Risk of Bias and GRADE criteria endorsed by the Cochrane collaboration was used to assess the internal validity of the study and overall confidence in the meta-analysis. The categories for on-farm sources were: broiler breeders/vertical transfer (number of studies = 32), animals (n = 57), humans (n = 26), environment (n = 54), and water (n = 63). Only three studies examined the antimicrobial resistance profiles of Campylobacter from these on-farm sources. Subgroups of data by source and outcome were analyzed using random effect meta-analysis. The highest risk for contaminating a new flock appears to be a contaminated barn environment due to insufficient cleaning and disinfection, insufficient downtime, and the presence of an adjacent broiler flock. Effective biosecurity enhancements from physical barriers to restricting human movement on the farm are recommended for consideration to enhance local on-farm food safety programs. Improved sampling procedures and standardized laboratory testing are needed for comparability across studies. Knowledge gaps that should be addressed include farm-level drug use and antimicrobial resistance information, further evaluation of the potential for vertical transfer, and improved genotyping methods to strengthen our understanding of Campylobacter epidemiology in broilers at the farm-level. This systematic review emphasizes the importance of improved industry-level and on-farm risk management strategies to reduce pre-harvest Campylobacter in broilers.  
  Address Laboratory for Foodborne Zoonoses, Public Health Agency of Canada, Guelph, Ontario, Canada; Department of Population Medicine, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada; Laboratory for Foodborne Zoonoses, Public Health Agency of Canada, Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2014/08/30  
  ISSN 1932-6203 (Electronic) 1932-6203 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMED, Scopus, Current Contents and Food Safety and Technology Abstracts searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1250 Serial 2738  
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Author (up) Akhtar, A.Z.; Pippin, J.J.; Sandusky, C.B. url  openurl
  Title Animal studies in spinal cord injury: a systematic review of methylprednisolone Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication Alternatives to Laboratory Animals : ATLA Abbreviated Journal Altern Lab Anim  
  Volume 37 Issue 1 Pages 43-62  
  Keywords Animals; Cats; Disease Models, Animal; Dogs; Haplorhini; Humans; Methylprednisolone/ therapeutic use; Mice; Neuroprotective Agents/ therapeutic use; Predictive Value of Tests; Rabbits; Rats; Recovery of Function; Sheep; Species Specificity; Spinal Cord Injuries/ drug therapy/physiopathology  
  Abstract The objective of this study was to examine whether animal studies can reliably be used to determine the usefulness of methylprednisolone (MP) and other treatments for acute spinal cord injury (SCI) in humans. This was achieved by performing a systematic review of animal studies on the effects of MP administration on the functional outcome of acute SCI. Data were extracted from the published articles relating to: outcome; MP dosing regimen; species/strain; number of animals; methodological quality; type of injury induction; use of anaesthesia; functional scale used; and duration of follow-up. Subgroup analyses were performed, based on species or strain, injury method, MP dosing regimen, functional outcome measured, and methodological quality. Sixty-two studies were included, which involved a wide variety of animal species and strains. Overall, beneficial effects of MP administration were obtained in 34% of the studies, no effects in 58%, and mixed results in 8%. The results were inconsistent both among and within species, even when attempts were made to detect any patterns in the results through subgroup analyses. The results of this study demonstrate the barriers to the accurate prediction from animal studies of the effectiveness of MP in the treatment of acute SCI in humans. This underscores the need for the development and implementation of validated testing methods.  
  Address Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, Washington, DC, USA. aysha.akhtar@oxfordanimalethics.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2009/03/19  
  ISSN 0261-1929 (Print) 0261-1929 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 611 Serial 2333  
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Author (up) Al-Samarai, F.R. url  openurl
  Title A meta-analysis of the impact of parity on dystocia and stillbirth in Holstein cattle Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Advances in Animal and Veterinary Sciences Abbreviated Journal Adv Anim Vet Sci  
  Volume 2 Issue 7 Pages 381-9  
  Keywords Dairy Animals [LL110]; Animal Reproduction and Embryology [LL250]; Non-communicable Diseases and Injuries of Animals [LL860]; age at first calving; calving interval; cows; dairy cattle; dairy cows; dystocia; fetal death; parturition; complications; cattle; Bos; Bovidae; ruminants; Artiodactyla; ungulates; mammals; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; eukaryotes; foetal death; [Indexed using CAB Thesaurus terms]  
  Abstract Dystocia and stillbirth are major factors reducing the productivity of dairy cattle. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of parity on the rates of dystocia and stillbirth. A meta-analysis was conducted to investigate the impact of first parity (primiparous) and later parities (multiparous) on dystocia and stillbirth in Holstein cattle. A total of 30 and 19 papers were analyzed for evaluation of two traits. Results revealed that primiparous cattle are more susceptible to dystocia [Odds Ratio (OR)=2.68, 95% Confidence interval (CI) 2.51 to 2.85], stillbirth (OR=2.18, 95% CI 1.84 to 2.58) as compared with multiparous. These results supported the opinion about the importance of considering primiparous and multiparous as different traits in genetic evaluation and shed light on the importance of improving genetics and environment of heifers to minimize the effect of dystocia and stillbirth in Holstein cattle.  
  Address Department of Veterinary Public Health, University of Baghdad, Baghdad, Iraq. firas_rashad@yahoo.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2309-3331 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, Google Scholar, CAB (Abstracts?), ISI Web of Knowledge (Web of Science?), Science Direct, SciQuest and Scirus searched. Database record copyright CAB International 2010. Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1278 Serial 2765  
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Author (up) Allan, K.J.; Biggs, H.M.; Halliday, J.E.; Kazwala, R.R.; Maro, V.P.; Cleaveland, S.; Crump, J.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Epidemiology of Leptospirosis in Africa: A Systematic Review of a Neglected Zoonosis and a Paradigm for 'One Health' in Africa Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases Abbreviated Journal PLoS Negl Trop Dis  
  Volume 9 Issue 9 Pages e0003899  
  Keywords Cows; Bovines, Leptospirosis; Epidemiology; One Health  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Leptospirosis is an important but neglected bacterial zoonosis that has been largely overlooked in Africa. In this systematic review, we aimed to summarise and compare current knowledge of: (1) the geographic distribution, prevalence, incidence and diversity of acute human leptospirosis in Africa; and (2) the geographic distribution, host range, prevalence and diversity of Leptospira spp. infection in animal hosts in Africa. METHODS: Following Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, we searched for studies that described (1) acute human leptospirosis and (2) pathogenic Leptospira spp. infection in animals. We performed a literature search using eight international and regional databases for English and non-English articles published between January 1930 to October 2014 that met out pre-defined inclusion criteria and strict case definitions. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: We identified 97 studies that described acute human leptospirosis (n = 46) or animal Leptospira infection (n = 51) in 26 African countries. The prevalence of acute human leptospirosis ranged from 2 3% to 19 8% (n = 11) in hospital patients with febrile illness. Incidence estimates were largely restricted to the Indian Ocean islands (3 to 101 cases per 100,000 per year (n = 6)). Data from Tanzania indicate that human disease incidence is also high in mainland Africa (75 to 102 cases per 100,000 per year). Three major species (Leptospira borgpetersenii, L. interrogans and L. kirschneri) are predominant in reports from Africa and isolates from a diverse range of serogroups have been reported in human and animal infections. Cattle appear to be important hosts of a large number of Leptospira serogroups in Africa, but few data are available to allow comparison of Leptospira infection in linked human and animal populations. We advocate a 'One Health' approach to promote multidisciplinary research efforts to improve understanding of the animal to human transmission of leptospirosis on the African continent.  
  Address The Boyd Orr Centre for Population and Ecosystem Health, Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, United Kingdom. Division of Infectious Diseases and International Health, Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, United States of America. Sokoine University of Agriculture, Morogoro, Tanzania. Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Centre, Moshi, Tanzania; Kilimanjaro Christian Medical University College, Tumaini University, Moshi, Tanzania. Division of Infectious Diseases and International Health, Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, United States of America; Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Centre, Moshi, Tanzania; Kilimanjaro Christian Medical University College, Tumaini University, Moshi, Tanzania; Duke Global Health Institute, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, United States of America; Centre for International Health, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2015/09/15  
  ISSN 1935-2735 (Electronic) 1935-2727 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, Web of Science, Biosis, CABI abstracts, Zoological Record, Africa-Wide NiPAD, and Africa Index Medicus searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1402 Serial 2864  
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Author (up) Allen, K.J.; Christley, R.M.; Birchall, M.A.; Franklin, S.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A systematic review of the efficacy of interventions for dynamic intermittent dorsal displacement of the soft palate Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Equine Veterinary Journal Abbreviated Journal Equine Vet J  
  Volume 44 Issue 3 Pages 259-266  
  Keywords Airway Obstruction/etiology/therapy/veterinary; Animals; Evidence-Based Practice/standards; Horse Diseases/diagnosis/etiology/therapy; Horses; Palate, Soft/pathology/physiopathology; Quality Assurance, Health Care; Research/standards; Treatment Outcome  
  Abstract There are numerous treatments for correction of dorsal displacement of the soft palate (DDSP). However, the efficacy of these treatments is controversial and there is little consensus on how best to treat this condition. The aims of this study were to systematically review the literature and to assess the evidence on the clinical effects of interventions for dynamic intermittent DDSP. A secondary objective was to assess whether factors relating to study quality affected reported success rates. Twenty-three studies were included, covering a wide number of interventions but also differing widely is terms of study design, sample size, method of diagnosis, outcome measure and the number lost to follow-up. The assessment of adverse effects was severely limited because of lack of reporting. The way in which success is measured appears to have a great effect on the reported results. Research synthesis has been severely limited because of the heterogeneity in the included studies. The low level of evidence makes it difficult to draw firm conclusions as to the efficacy of procedures for DDSP. Hence it is currently not possible to determine which procedure is the most appropriate. This systematic review highlights the difficulties of studying palatal dysfunction and suggests areas where improvements can be made in future studies.  
  Address Department of Clinical Veterinary Science, University of Bristol, UK. kate.allen@bristol.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2011/09/02  
  ISSN 2042-3306 (Electronic) 0425-1644 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes MEDLINE, PUBMED, ISI Web of Science, CAB Abstracts, Embase and IVIS searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 612 Serial 2334  
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Author (up) Anderson, S.L.; Duke-Novakovski, T.; Singh, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The immune response to anesthesia: Part 1 Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia Abbreviated Journal Vet Anaesth Analg  
  Volume 41 Issue 2 Pages 113-126  
  Keywords Anesthesia/veterinary; Anesthetics/administration & dosage; Anesthetics/immunology; Animals; Respiration, Artificial/veterinary; Anesthetics; Anaesthetics  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To review the immune response to anesthesia including mechanical ventilation, inhaled anesthetic gases, and injectable anesthetics and sedatives. STUDY DESIGN: Review. METHODS AND DATABASES: Multiple literature searches were performed using PubMed and Google Scholar from spring 2012 through fall 2013. Relevant anesthetic and immune terms were used to search databases without year published or species constraints. The online database for Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia and the Journal of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care were searched by issue starting in 2000 for relevant articles. CONCLUSION: Recent research data indicate that commonly used volatile anesthetic agents, such as isoflurane and sevoflurane, may have a protective effect on vital organs. With the lung as the target organ, protection using an appropriate anesthetic protocol may be possible during direct pulmonary insults, including mechanical ventilation, and during systemic disease processes, such as endotoxemia, generalized sepsis, and ischemia-reperfusion injury.  
  Address Department of Veterinary Biomedical Sciences, Western College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2014/03/05  
  ISSN 1467-2995 (Electronic) 1467-2987 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, Google Scholar, Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia, and Journal of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1212 Serial 2703  
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Author (up) Anderson, S.L.; Duke-Novakovski, T.; Singh, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The immune response to anesthesia: Part 2 sedatives, opioids, and injectable anesthetic agents Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia Abbreviated Journal Vet Anaesth Analg  
  Volume 41 Issue 6 Pages 553-66  
  Keywords Animals; Anaesthesia; Anaesthetics  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To review the immune response to injectable anesthetics and sedatives and to compare the immunomodulatory properties between inhalation and injectable anesthetic protocols. STUDY DESIGN: Review. METHODS AND DATABASES: Multiple literature searches were performed using PubMed and Google Scholar from March 2012 through November 2013. Relevant anesthetic and immune terms were used to search databases without year published or species constraints. The online database for Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia and the Journal of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care were searched by issue starting in 2000 for relevant articles. CONCLUSION: Sedatives, injectable anesthetics, opioids, and local anesthetics have immunomodulatory effects that may have positive or negative consequences on disease processes such as endotoxemia, generalized sepsis, tumor growth and metastasis, and ischemia-reperfusion injury. Therefore, anesthetists should consider the immunomodulatory effects of anesthetic drugs when designing anesthetic protocols for their patients.  
  Address Department of Veterinary Biomedical Sciences, Western College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2014/06/26  
  ISSN 1467-2995 (Electronic) 1467-2987 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, Google Scholar, Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia, and Journal of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1233 Serial 2722  
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Author (up) Andretta, I.; Kipper, M.; Lehnen, C.R.; Hauschild, L.; Vale, M.M.; Lovatto, P.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Meta-analytical study of productive and nutritional interactions of mycotoxins in growing pigs Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Animal : an International Journal of Animal Bioscience Abbreviated Journal Animal  
  Volume 6 Issue 9 Pages 1476-1482  
  Keywords Age Factors; Animal Feed/analysis/microbiology; Animal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena; Animals; Feeding Behavior/drug effects; Female; Food Contamination; Male; Mycotoxins/metabolism/toxicity; Organ Size/drug effects; Sex Factors; Swine/growth & development/microbiology/physiology; Weight Gain/drug effects; Pigs; Swine  
  Abstract A meta-analysis was carried out in order to study the association of mycotoxins with performance and organ weights in growing pigs. A total of 85 articles published between 1968 and 2010 were used, totaling 1012 treatments and 13 196 animals. The meta-analysis followed three sequential analyses: graphical, correlation and variance-covariance. The presence of mycotoxins in diets was seen to reduce the feed intake by 18% and the weight gain in 21% compared with the control group. Deoxynivalenol and aflatoxins were the mycotoxins with the greatest impact on the feed intake and growth of pigs, reducing by 26% and 16% in the feed intake and by 26% and 22% in the weight gain. The mycotoxin concentration in diets and the animal age at challenge were the variables that more improved the coefficient of determination in equations for estimating the effect of mycotoxins on weight gain. The mycotoxin effect on growth proved to be greater in younger animals. In addition, the residual analysis showed that the greater part of the variation in weight gain was explained by the variation in feed intake (87%). The protein and methionine levels in diets could influence the feed intake and the weight gain in challenged animals. The weight gain in challenged pigs showed a positive correlation with the methionine level in diets (0.68). The mycotoxin effect on growth was greater in males compared with the effect on females. The reduction in weight gain was of 15% in the female group and 19% in the male group. Mycotoxin presence in pig diets has interfered in the relative weight of the liver, the kidneys and the heart. Mycotoxins have an influence on performance and organ weight in pigs. However, the magnitude of the effects varies with the type and concentration of mycotoxin, sex and the animal age, as well as nutritional factors.  
  Address Grupo de Modelagem Animal, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria, RS 97105-900, Brazil. iandretta@gmail.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2012/10/04  
  ISSN 1751-732X (Electronic) 1751-7311 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Google Scholar, HighWire, ScienceDirect Scopus, Scielo and PubMed searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 862 Serial 2335  
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Author (up) Anestis, M.D.; Anestis, J.C.; Zawilinski, L.L.; Hopkins, T.A.; Lilienfeld, S.O. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Equine-related treatments for mental disorders lack empirical support: a systematic review of empirical investigations Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Journal of Clinical Psychology Abbreviated Journal J Clin Psychol  
  Volume 70 Issue 12 Pages 1115-32  
  Keywords Horses; Animal Assisted Therapy  
  Abstract CONTEXT: Equine-related treatments (ERT) for mental disorders are becoming increasingly popular for a variety of diagnoses; however, they have been subjected only to limited systematic investigation. OBJECTIVE: To examine the quality of and results from peer-reviewed research on ERT for mental disorders and related outcomes. METHOD: Peer-reviewed studies (k = 14) examining treatments for mental disorders or closely related outcomes were identified from databases and article reference sections. RESULTS: All studies were compromised by a substantial number of threats to validity, calling into question the meaning and clinical significance of their findings. Additionally, studies failed to provide consistent evidence that ERT is superior to the mere passage of time in the treatment of any mental disorder. CONCLUSION: The current evidence base does not justify the marketing and utilization of ERT for mental disorders. Such services should not be offered to the public unless and until well-designed studies provide evidence that justify different conclusions.  
  Address University of Southern Mississippi.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2014/06/24  
  ISSN 1097-4679 (Electronic) 0021-9762 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PsycINFO searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1234 Serial 2723  
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