toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print
  Records Links
Author (down) Zoidis, E.; Demiris, N.; Kominakis, A.; Pappas, A.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Meta-analysis of selenium accumulation and expression of antioxidant enzymes in chicken tissues Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Animal : an International Journal of Animal Bioscience Abbreviated Journal Animal  
  Volume 8 Issue 4 Pages 542-54  
  Keywords Chickens; Poultry; Nutrition  
  Abstract A meta-analysis integrating results of 40 selenium (Se) supplementation experiments that originated from 35 different controlled randomized trials was carried out in an attempt to identify significant factors that affect tissue Se accumulation in chicken. Examined factors included: Se source (12 different sources examined), type of chicken (laying hens or broilers), age of birds at the beginning of supplementation, duration of supplementation, year during which the study was conducted, sex of birds, number of chickens per treatment, method of analysis, tissue type, concentration of Se determined and Se added to feed. A correlation analysis was also carried out between tissue Se concentration and glutathione peroxidase activity. Data analysis showed that the factors significantly affecting tissue Se concentration include type of chicken (P=0.006), type of tissue (P<0.001) and the analytical method used (P=0.014). Although Se source was not found to affect tissue Se concentration (overall P>0.05), certain inorganic (sodium selenite), calcium selenite, sodium selenate and organic sources (B-Traxim Se), Se-yeast, Se-malt, Se-enriched cabbage and Se-enriched garlic as well as background Se level from feed ingredients were found to significantly affect tissue Se concentration. The Se accumulation rate (estimated as linear regression coefficient of Se concentrations to Se added to feed) discriminated between the various tissues with highest values estimated in the leg muscle and lowest in blood plasma. Correlation analysis has also shown that tissue Se concentration (pooled data) was correlated to Se added to feed (r=0.529, P<0.01, log values) and to glutathione peroxidase activity (r=0.332, P=0.0478), with the latter not being correlated with Se added to feed. Although significant factors affecting Se concentration were reported in the present study, they do not necessarily indicate the in vivo function of the antioxidant system or the level of accumulated Se as other factors, not examined in the present study, may interact at the level of trace element absorption, distribution and retention.  
  Address Department of Nutritional Physiology and Feeding, Faculty of Animal Science and Aquaculture, Agricultural University of Athens, 75 Iera Odos, 11855 Athens, Greece. 2 Department of Statistics, Athens University of Economics and Business, 76 Patission Str., 10434 Athens, Greece. 3 Department of Animal Breeding and Husbandry, Faculty of Animal Science and Aquaculture, Agricultural University of Athens, 75 Iera Odos, 11855 Athens, Greece.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2014/01/07  
  ISSN 1751-732X (Electronic) 1751-7311 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Academic Onefile, AGRICOLA, BIDS, Biochemistry and Biophysics Citation Index, BioInfoBank Library, Biological Abstracts, Biosis Previews, CAB Abstracts, Elsevier biobase-CABS, EMBASE, Current Contents/Life Sciences, EMBiology, Google Scholar, IBIDS (International Bibliographic Information on Dietary Supplements), IngentaConnect, MEDLINE, NLM Gateway, OvidSP, PubMed, Science Direct, Scopus and Wilson Web searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1195 Serial 2689  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Zhou, G.; Zhou, X.; He, Y.; Shao, J.; Hu, Z.; Liu, R.; Zhou, H.; Hosseinibai, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Grazing intensity significantly affects belowground carbon and nitrogen cycling in grassland ecosystems: a meta-analysis Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Global Change Biology Abbreviated Journal Glob Chang Biol  
  Volume 23 Issue 3 Pages 1167-1179  
  Keywords Grazing; Carbon; Livestock; Cattle, Cows; Sheep, Bovine; Ovine  
  Abstract Livestock grazing activities potentially alter ecosystem carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycles in grassland ecosystems. Despite the fact that numerous individual studies and a few meta-analyses had been conducted, how grazing, especially its intensity, affects belowground C and N cycling in grasslands remains unclear. In this study, we performed a comprehensive meta-analysis of 115 published studies to examine the responses of 19 variables associated with belowground C and N cycling to livestock grazing in global grasslands. Our results showed that, on average, grazing significantly decreased belowground C and N pools in grassland ecosystems, with the largest decreases in microbial biomass C and N (21.62% and 24.40%, respectively). In contrast, belowground fluxes, including soil respiration, soil net N mineralization and soil N nitrification increased by 4.25%, 34.67% and 25.87%, respectively, in grazed grasslands compared to ungrazed ones. More importantly, grazing intensity significantly affected the magnitude (even direction) of changes in the majority of the assessed belowground C and N pools and fluxes, and C : N ratio as well as soil moisture. Specifically,light grazing contributed to soil C and N sequestration whereas moderate and heavy grazing significantly increased C and N losses. In addition, soil depth, livestock type and climatic conditions influenced the responses of selected variables to livestock grazing to some degree. Our findings highlight the importance of the effects of grazing intensity on belowground C and N cycling, which may need to be incorporated into regional and global models for predicting effects of human disturbance on global grasslands and assessing the climate-biosphere feedbacks.  
  Address School of Ecological and Environmental Sciences, East China Normal University, Shanghai, 200062, China. Institute of Agricultural Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu, 212013, China. Center for Global Change and Ecological Forecasting, East China Normal University, Shanghai, 200062, China. Coastal Ecosystems Research Station of Yangtze River Estuary, Ministry of Education Key Laboratory for Biodiversity Science and Ecological Engineering, Institute of Biodiversity Science, Fudan University, 220 Handan Road, Shanghai, 200433, China. Faculty of Science, Health, Education and Engineering, University of the Sunshine Coast, Maroochydore, DC, Qld, 4558, Australia.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2016/07/15  
  ISSN 1365-2486 (Electronic) 1354-1013 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Web of Science and China Knowledge Resource Integrated Database (CNKI) searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1461 Serial 2917  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Zeiler, F.A.; Sader, N.; Gillman, L.M.; Teitelbaum, J.; West, M.; Kazina, C.J. doi  openurl
  Title The Cerebrovascular Response to Ketamine: A Systematic Review of the Animal and Human Literature Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Journal of Neurosurgical Anesthesiology Abbreviated Journal J Neurosurg Anesthesiol  
  Volume Epublication ahead of print Issue Pages  
  Keywords Animal models; Mice; Rats; Ketamine  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: The aim of the study was to perform a systematic review of the literature on the cerebrovascular/cerebral blood flow (CBF) effects of ketamine in both animal and human subjects. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We searched MEDLINE, BIOSIS, EMBASE, Global Health, SCOPUS, and Cochrane Library from inception to December 2014. Two reviewers independently identified all manuscripts pertaining to the administration of ketamine in both human and animal subjects in which the impact on CBF/cerebral vasculature was recorded by means of functional magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, single-photon emission computed tomography, xenon computed tomography, transcranial Doppler velocities, arteriovenous difference in N2O method of CBF measurement, cerebral digital subtraction angiography, or any other objective means of CBF determination. RESULTS: We identified 38 animal studies with various animal models studied. Overall there was a trend to a direct vasodilatory effect of ketamine on the cerebral vasculature, with a trend in most studies to an increase or regional CBF (rCBF) or global CBF.Twenty human studies were identified. The majority displayed an increase in rCBF and global CBF on imaging in patients without neurological illness. CONCLUSIONS: Animal models indicate an increase in global CBF and rCBF with ketamine administration, with a trend to vasodilation of medium-sized intracranial vessels through a calcium-dependent mechanism. Human studies display an Oxford 2b, Grading of Recommendation Assessment Development and Education C, level of evidence to support a trend to increased global CBF and rCBF with ketamine administration in both healthy volunteers and elective surgical patients without neurological illness.  
  Address *Section of Neurosurgery daggerDepartment of Medical Sciences double daggerSection of Critical Care and General Surgery, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB section signSection of Neurocritical Care, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2015/10/16  
  ISSN 1537-1921 (Electronic) 0898-4921 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes MEDLINE, BIOSIS, EMBASE, Global Health, SCOPUS, and Cochrane Library searched Approved no  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1382 Serial 2849  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Zebeli, Q.; Metzler-Zebeli, B.U.; Ametaj, B.N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Meta-analysis reveals threshold level of rapidly fermentable dietary concentrate that triggers systemic inflammation in cattle Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Journal of Dairy Science Abbreviated Journal J Dairy Sci  
  Volume 95 Issue 5 Pages 2662-2672  
  Keywords Animal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena/physiology; Animals; Cattle; Cattle Diseases/etiology; Diet/adverse effects/veterinary; Dietary Fiber/adverse effects; Female; Inflammation/etiology/veterinary; Male; Rumen/physiology  
  Abstract This study examined the extent by which changes in the concentrate level and neutral detergent fiber (NDF) content in the diet as well as the severity of acidotic insult, measured as the duration time of rumen pH below 6.0 and daily mean rumen pH, and the concentration of endotoxin in the rumen fluid are involved in the development of inflammatory conditions in cattle. A meta-analytical approach accounting for inter- and intraexperimental variation was used to generate prediction models, and data from recent studies were used to parameterize these models. A total of 10 recently conducted experiments with 43 different dietary treatments fulfilled the criteria for inclusion in this study. Diets of all of the experiments included in this meta-analysis were based on rapidly degradable grain sources, such as barley and wheat, and the findings of this study apply only to these kinds of diets. Data indicated that greater levels of concentrate in the diet were associated with increased concentrations of rumen endotoxin (R(2)=0.27), plasma haptoglobin (R(2)=0.19), and serum amyloid A (SAA) level (R(2)=0.46). Similar correlations, but in opposite directions, were observed between dietary NDF content and rumen endotoxin (R(2)=0.39) and plasma SAA concentrations (R(2)=0.22). The meta-analysis revealed that the relationships between those variables were not linear. Additionally, the breakpoint model fitted to the data of rumen endotoxin, plasma haptoglobin, and SAA indicated the presence of a threshold level of dietary concentrate and NDF, above which those responses became linear to increasing amounts of concentrate or decreasing contents of NDF in the diet. Also, feeding cattle more than 44.1% concentrate or less than 39.2% NDF in the diet was associated with a linear increase in the risk of systemic inflammation. Low daily mean rumen pH (R(2)=0.38) and duration of rumen pH <6.0 (R(2)=0.59) were associated with increased concentrations of endotoxin in the rumen fluid; although those events were not always associated with systemic inflammation. Accordingly, only 15 to 21% of the overall variation in the responses of SAA was explained by variables of rumen pH, whereas the concentrate level in the diet accounted for 46% of this variation. In conclusion, data from this study indicated the presence of thresholds of dietary concentrate and NDF levels in the diets based on rapidly fermentable grains beyond which the risk of systemic inflammation in cattle increases linearly.  
  Address Institute of Animal Nutrition, Department for Farm Animals and Veterinary Public Health, Vetmeduni Vienna, Vienna, Austria. Qendrim.Zebeli@vetmeduni.ac.at  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2012/05/01  
  ISSN 1525-3198 (Electronic) 0022-0302 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, Google Scholar, ScienceDirect and Scopus searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 824 Serial 2652  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Zanton, G.I.; Heinrichs, A.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Analysis of nitrogen utilization and excretion in growing dairy cattle Type Journal Article
  Year 2008 Publication Journal of Dairy Science Abbreviated Journal J Dairy Sci  
  Volume 91 Issue 4 Pages 1519-1533  
  Keywords Animal Feed; Animal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena; Animals; Body Weight; Cattle/growth & development/metabolism; Diet/veterinary; Digestion; Feces/chemistry; Female; Linear Models; Milk/metabolism; Models, Biological; Nitrogen/analysis/metabolism; Weaning; Cattle  
  Abstract Literature data on utilization of dietary N were analyzed by using meta-analytic procedures for growing milk-fed dairy calves and weaned dairy heifers. The objective was to statistically assess N utilization and excretion in growing dairy cattle when dietary N was altered in otherwise balanced rations at various stages of growth. Studies meeting the selection criteria included data from 16 published papers encompassing 94 distinct observations made on 217 animals. Of these, 6 studied calves were fed milk or milk protein-based milk replacer [milk-fed; 30 to 81 kg of body weight (BW)] with 37 different dietary treatments, and 10 experiments studied heifers receiving diets based on forage, concentrates, or a combination of forage and concentrates (weaned; 56 to 472 kg of BW) with 57 different dietary treatments. Mixed model and fixed effect regression analyses were used to evaluate responses to additional dietary N. True digestibility of dietary N was 100.4% for milk-fed calves and 96.4% for weaned heifers, with corresponding basal fecal N excretion values of 3.05 and 6.51 g of N/kg of dry matter intake. Urinary N (g of N/kg of BW(0.75)) was consistently greater for milk-fed calves, but the response to increasing N intake was parallel to the response for weaned heifers. Whether using a mixed model approach or a fixed effect approach to account for metabolizable energy intake, BW, and dry matter intake, milk-fed calves retained more N per kilogram of BW(0.75) than weaned heifers. However, marginal efficiency of N utilization responded as a continuous function of BW, as opposed to a bimodal response associated with diet type. Gross N efficiency (GNE) responded quadratically to N intake and was greater for milk-fed calves than for weaned heifers. Linear and quadratic coefficients of this function did not differ between diet types, indicating that the response in gross N efficiency to additional N intake was not different between diet groups; rather, the absolute level obtainable differed. Dietary CP concentrations of 18.9% for milk-fed calves and 14.2% for weaned heifers were found to maximize GNE; 22.5% MJ of crude protein/MJ of ME was found to maximize GNE for both groups. Equations are discussed relative to the requirements to replace basal N losses and efficiency of N utilization.  
  Address Department of Dairy and Animal Science, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2008/03/20  
  ISSN 1525-3198 (Electronic) 0022-0302 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed and Web of Science searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 823 Serial 2651  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Zanton, G.I.; Bowman, G.R.; Vazquez-Anon, M.; Rode, L.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Meta-analysis of the lactation performance in dairy cows receiving supplemental dietary methionine sources or postruminal infusion of methionine Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Journal of Dairy Science Abbreviated Journal J Dairy Sci  
  Volume 97 Issue 11 Pages 7085-101  
  Keywords Cattle; Cows  
  Abstract The objectives of our study were to evaluate the productive response to methionine supplementation in lactating dairy cows and to define a relationship between metabolizable Met (MP Met) intake and production. A database of 64 papers meeting the selection criteria was developed evaluating postruminally infused dl-methionine (9 papers with 18 control diets and 35 treatment comparisons), 2-hydroxy-4-methylthio butanoic acid (HMTBa) provided as either a liquid or Ca salt form (17 papers with 34 control diets and 46 treatment comparisons), Mepron (Evonik Industries, Essen, Germany; 18 papers with 35 control diets and 42 treatment comparisons), and Smartamine (Adisseo Inc., Antony, France; 20 papers with 30 control diets and 39 treatment comparisons). Dietary ingredients and their accompanying nutritional compositions as described in the reports were entered into the Cornell-Penn-Miner software to model the diets and to predict nutrients that were not reported in the original publication. Data were analyzed using a weighted analysis of response to supplementation compared with the intraexperiment control, as well as through a regression analysis to changing dietary MP Met. Data included in the analysis were from experiments published between 1970 and 2011 with cows supplemented with between 3.5 and 67.9 g of Met or its equivalent from HMTBa. Cows supplemented with Smartamine consumed more, whereas cows supplemented with Mepron consumed less DM compared with controls. Milk yield did not significantly respond to Met supplementation, although it tended to increase for cows supplemented with HMTBa and Mepron. Milk protein yield was increased due to supplementation from all sources or from infusion, and protein concentration was greater for all supplements or infusion of dl-Met, except for cows supplemented with HMTBa. Irrespective of Met source, milk protein yield increased 2.23 g of protein/g of MP Met until reaching the breakpoint. Milk fat yield was increased for Mepron and HMTBa, whereas milk fat concentration was increased for infused dl-Met and for cows supplemented with HMTBa. Based on regression analysis, response of milk fat yield to Met supplementation was not different for infused dl-Met, Mepron, and Smartamine (1.87 g of fat/g of MP Met), whereas the response to HMTBa was significantly greater at 5.38 g of fat/g of MP Met.  
  Address Novus International Inc., St. Charles, MO 63304. Novus International Inc., St. Charles, MO 63304. Electronic address: Mercedes.vazquez@novusint.com.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2014/09/23  
  ISSN 1525-3198 (Electronic) 0022-0302 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Google Scholar, Nerac Inc database and published meta-analyses searched. Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1258 Serial 2746  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Zammarchi, L.; Strohmeyer, M.; Bartalesi, F.; Bruno, E.; Munoz, J.; Buonfrate, D.; Nicoletti, A.; Garcia, H.H.; Pozio, E.; Bartoloni, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Epidemiology and management of cysticercosis and Taenia solium taeniasis in Europe, systematic review 1990-2011 Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication PLoS One Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 8 Issue 7 Pages e69537  
  Keywords Animals; Cysticercosis/diagnosis/epidemiology/parasitology; Europe/epidemiology; Humans; Taenia solium/pathogenicity; Taeniasis/diagnosis/epidemiology/parasitology; Pigs; Swine  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Cysticercosis is caused by the invasion of human or pig tissues by the metacestode larval stage of Taenia solium. In Europe, the disease was endemic in the past but the autochthonous natural life cycle of the parasite is currently completed very rarely. Recently, imported cases have increased in parallel to the increased number of migrations and international travels. The lack of specific surveillance systems for cysticercosis leads to underestimation of the epidemiological and clinical impacts. OBJECTIVES: To review the available data on epidemiology and management of cysticercosis in Europe. METHODS: A review of literature on human cysticercosis and T. solium taeniasis in Europe published between 1990-2011 was conducted. RESULTS: Out of 846 cysticercosis cases described in the literature, 522 cases were autochthonous and 324 cases were imported. The majority (70.1%) of the autochthonous cases were diagnosed in Portugal from 1983 and 1994. Imported cases of which 242 (74.7%) diagnosed in migrants and 57 (17.6%) in European travellers, showed an increasing trend. Most of imported cases were acquired in Latin America (69.8% of migrants and 44.0% of travellers). The majority of imported cases were diagnosed in Spain (47.5%), France (16.7%) and Italy (8.3%). One third of neurosurgical procedures were performed because the suspected diagnosis was cerebral neoplasm. Sixty eight autochthonous and 5 imported T. solium taeniasis cases were reported. CONCLUSIONS: Cysticercosis remains a challenge for European care providers, since they are often poorly aware of this infection and have little familiarity in managing this disease. Cysticercosis should be included among mandatory reportable diseases, in order to improve the accuracy of epidemiological information. European health care providers might benefit from a transfer of knowledge from colleagues working in endemic areas and the development of shared diagnostic and therapeutic processes would have impact on the quality of the European health systems.  
  Address Infectious Disease Unit, Department of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, University of Florence School of Medicine, Florence, Italy.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2013/08/08  
  ISSN 1932-6203 (Electronic) 1932-6203 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library and European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1216 Serial 2706  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Zambrano, L.D.; Levy, K.; Menezes, N.P.; Freeman, M.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Human diarrhea infections associated with domestic animal husbandry: a systematic review and meta-analysis Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene Abbreviated Journal Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg  
  Volume 108 Issue 6 Pages 313-325  
  Keywords Animal Husbandry/methods; Animals; Animals, Domestic/microbiology; Campylobacter Infections/epidemiology; Campylobacter Infections/prevention & control; Campylobacter Infections/transmission; Campylobacter Infections/veterinary; Diarrhea/epidemiology; Diarrhea/microbiology; Diarrhea/prevention & control; Feces/microbiology; Humans; Poultry Diseases/epidemiology; Poultry Diseases/microbiology; Poultry Diseases/prevention & control; Qualitative Research; Risk Factors; Zoonoses/microbiology; Zoonoses/prevention & control; Zoonoses/transmission; Zoonoses; Cattle; Poultry; Pigs; Swine; Sheep; Goats  
  Abstract Domestic animal husbandry, a common practice globally, can lead to zoonotic transmission of enteric pathogens. However, this risk has received little attention to date. This systematic review and meta-analysis examines the evidence for an association between domestic exposure to food-producing animals and cases of human diarrhea and specific enteric infections. We performed a systematic review of available literature to examine domestic livestock and poultry as risk factors for diarrhea and applied pre-determined quality criteria. Where possible, we carried out meta-analysis of specific animal-pathogen pairs. We found consistent evidence of a positive association between exposure to domestic food-producing animals and diarrheal illness across a range of animal exposures and enteric pathogens. Out of 29 studies included in the review, 20 (69.0%) reported a positive association between domestic animal exposure and diarrhea. Domestic exposure to poultry revealed a substantial association with human campylobacteriosis (OR 2.73, 95% CI 1.90-3.93). Our results suggest that domestic poultry and livestock exposures are associated with diarrheal illness in humans. Failure to ascertain the microbial cause of disease may mask this effect. Exposure to domestic animals should be considered a risk factor for human diarrheal illness and additional studies may identify potential mitigation strategies to address this risk.  
  Address Department of Environmental Health, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, 1518 Clifton Rd NE, CNR 2027, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA. Department of Environmental Health, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, 1518 Clifton Rd NE, CNR 2027, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA mcfreem@emory.edu.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2014/05/09  
  ISSN 1878-3503 (Electronic) 0035-9203 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, Web of Science and Embase searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1226 Serial 2715  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Yun, Y.; Kim, K.; Choi, I.; Ko, S.G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Topical herbal application in the management of atopic dermatitis: a review of animal studies Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Mediators of Inflammation Abbreviated Journal Mediators Inflamm  
  Volume 2014 Issue Pages 752103  
  Keywords Administration, Topical Animals Dermatitis, Atopic/ drug therapy Plant Extracts/ administration & dosage/ therapeutic use Skin/drug effects/pathology  
  Abstract Herbs are widely used in the treatment of atopic dermatitis (AD) in Eastern Asian countries, and certain herbs regarded have anti-inflammatory properties that can help with AD. With the goal of developing a topical herbal agent for AD, we conducted a systematic review of in vivo studies of AD-like skin models for screening potential herbs. Searches were conducted from PubMed and EMBASE. After all, 22 studies were included for this review. We judged most of the domains of all studies to be at unclear risk of bias. Among 22 included studies, 21 herbs have been reported to reduce AD-like skin lesions in mouse models by suppressing Th2 cell response. Our findings may offer potential herbs for the topical application treatment of AD.  
  Address Department of Dermatology of Korean Medicine, College of Korean Medicine, Graduate School of Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701, Republic of Korea ; Department of Dermatology of Korean Medicine, Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, No. 149 Sangil-dong, Gangdong-gu, Seoul 134-090, Republic of Korea. Department of Ophthalmology & Otorhinolaryngology & Dermatology of Korean Medicine, College of Korean Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701, Republic of Korea. Department of Dermatology of Korean Medicine, Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, No. 149 Sangil-dong, Gangdong-gu, Seoul 134-090, Republic of Korea ; Department of Ophthalmology & Otorhinolaryngology & Dermatology of Korean Medicine, College of Korean Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701, Republic of Korea. Department of Preventive Medicine, College of Korean Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701, Republic of Korea.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2014/07/16  
  ISSN 1466-1861 (Electronic) 0962-9351 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed and Embase searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1320 Serial 2801  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Young, I.; Wilhelm, B.J.; Cahill, S.; Nakagawa, R.; Desmarchelier, P.; Rajic, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A Rapid Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of the Efficacy of Slaughter and Processing Interventions to Control Non-Typhoidal Salmonella in Beef and Pork Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Journal of Food Protection Abbreviated Journal J Food Prot  
  Volume 79 Issue 12 Pages 2196-2210  
  Keywords Cattle; Cows; Bovine; Swine; Pigs; Abattoirs; Public health; Food Contamination; Salmonella  
  Abstract Pork is one of the major food sources of human salmonellosis worldwide, while beef products have been implicated in numerous foodborne outbreaks. As a result, effective interventions to reduce Salmonella contamination during beef and pork processing are of interest to both regulators and industry. We conducted a rapid systematic review and meta-analysis of literature investigating the efficacy of slaughter and processing interventions to control Salmonella in beef and pork. Review steps included: a comprehensive search strategy; relevance screening of abstracts; relevance confirmation of articles; data extraction; risk-of-bias assessment; meta-analysis (where appropriate); and a weight-of-evidence assessment. A total of 191 relevant experimental studies were identified. Two controlled trials indicated that hot water and steam treatments are effective at reducing the prevalence of Salmonella on beef carcasses (relative risk [RR] = 0.11, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.02, 0.58), while four trials found that pre-chill organic acid washes are effective at reducing Salmonella on pork carcasses (RR = 0.32, 95% CI: 0.13, 0.78), with high confidence in the estimates of effect. Four quasi-experimental studies found that post-exsanguination chemical washes were effective to reduce the prevalence of Salmonella on cattle hides, with low confidence in the specific estimate of effect; moderate confidence was found for the effect estimates of scalding (RR = 0.20, 95% CI: 0.14, 0.29) and singeing (RR = 0.34, 95% CI: 0.22, 0.52) of pork carcasses. The overall evidence supported enhanced reductions of Salmonella through a multiple-hurdle approach. In conclusion, various slaughter and processing interventions can contribute to reducing Salmonella on beef and pork carcasses, depending on the context of application; an appropriate combination should be selected, validated, and verified by establishment operators within their local conditions.  
  Address School of Occupational and Public Health, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, POD 249, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M5B 2K3. Department of Population Medicine, University of Guelph, 50 Stone Road, Guelph, Ontario, Canada, N1G 2W1. Food Safety and Quality Unit, Office of Food Safety, Agriculture and Consumer Protection Department, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Viale delle Terme di Caracalla, Rome 00153, Italy. Department of Food Safety and Zoonoses, World Health Organization, 20 Avenue Appia, 1211 Geneva 27, Switzerland. Food Safety Principles, 558 Pullenvale Road, Pullenvale, Queensland 4069, Australia.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2017/01/21  
  ISSN 1944-9097 (Electronic) 0362-028X (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Databases not stated in abstract and full citation not accessible Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1441 Serial 2902  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Young, I.; Waddell, L.; Sanchez, J.; Wilhelm, B.; McEwen, S.A.; Rajic, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The application of knowledge synthesis methods in agri-food public health: recent advancements, challenges and opportunities Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Preventive Veterinary Medicine Abbreviated Journal Prev Vet Med  
  Volume 113 Issue 4 Pages 339-55  
  Keywords Female; Humans; Meta-Analysis as Topic Public Health/methods; Review Literature as Topic; Veterinary Medicine/methods  
  Abstract Knowledge synthesis refers to the integration of findings from individual research studies on a given topic or question into the global knowledge base. The application of knowledge synthesis methods, particularly systematic reviews and meta-analysis, has increased considerably in the agri-food public health sector over the past decade and this trend is expected to continue. The objectives of our review were: (1) to describe the most promising knowledge synthesis methods and their applicability in agri-food public health, and (2) to summarize the recent advancements, challenges, and opportunities in the use of systematic review and meta-analysis methods in this sector. We performed a structured review of knowledge synthesis literature from various disciplines to address the first objective, and used comprehensive insights and experiences in applying these methods in the agri-food public health sector to inform the second objective. We describe five knowledge synthesis methods that can be used to address various agri-food public health questions or topics under different conditions and contexts. Scoping reviews describe the main characteristics and knowledge gaps in a broad research field and can be used to evaluate opportunities for prioritizing focused questions for related systematic reviews. Structured rapid reviews are streamlined systematic reviews conducted within a short timeframe to inform urgent decision-making. Mixed-method and qualitative reviews synthesize diverse sources of contextual knowledge (e.g. socio-cognitive, economic, and feasibility considerations). Systematic reviews are a structured and transparent method used to summarize and synthesize literature on a clearly-defined question, and meta-analysis is the statistical combination of data from multiple individual studies. We briefly describe and discuss key advancements in the use of systematic reviews and meta-analysis, including: risk-of-bias assessments; an overall quality-of-evidence approach; engagement of stakeholders; Bayesian, multivariate, and network meta-analysis; and synthesis of diagnostic test accuracy studies. We also highlight several challenges and opportunities in the conduct of systematic reviews (e.g. inclusion of grey literature, minimizing language bias, and optimizing search strategies) and meta-analysis (e.g. inclusion of observational studies and approaches to address the insufficient reporting of data and significant heterogeneity). Many of these developments have yet to be comprehensively applied and evaluated in an agri-food public health context, and more research is needed in this area. There is a need to strengthen knowledge synthesis capacity and infrastructure at the regional, national, and international levels in this sector to ensure that the best available knowledge is used to inform future decision-making about agri-food public health issues.  
  Address Laboratory for Foodborne Zoonoses, Public Health Agency of Canada, 160 Research Lane, Guelph, Ontario, Canada N1G 5B2; Department of Population Medicine, University of Guelph, 50 Stone Road, Guelph, Ontario, Canada N1G 2W1. Electronic address: ian.young@phac-aspc.gc.ca. Laboratory for Foodborne Zoonoses, Public Health Agency of Canada, 160 Research Lane, Guelph, Ontario, Canada N1G 5B2; Department of Population Medicine, University of Guelph, 50 Stone Road, Guelph, Ontario, Canada N1G 2W1. Department of Health Management, University of Prince Edward Island, 550 University Avenue, Charlottetown, PE, Canada C1A 4P3. Department of Population Medicine, University of Guelph, 50 Stone Road, Guelph, Ontario, Canada N1G 2W1. Department of Population Medicine, University of Guelph, 50 Stone Road, Guelph, Ontario, Canada N1G 2W1; Nutrition and Consumer Protection Division, Food and Agriculture Organization, Viale delle Terme di Caracalla, Roma 00153, Italy.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2014/02/04  
  ISSN 1873-1716 (Electronic) 0167-5877 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes MEDLINE, Scopus, CAB Direct (CAB Abstracts), Current Contents Connect and CINAHL searched Approved no  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1274 Serial 2761  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Young, I.; Rajic, A.; Wilhelm, B.J.; Waddell, L.; Parker, S.; McEwen, S.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Comparison of the prevalence of bacterial enteropathogens, potentially zoonotic bacteria and bacterial resistance to antimicrobials in organic and conventional poultry, swine and beef production: a systematic review and meta-analysis Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication Epidemiology and Infection Abbreviated Journal Epidemiol Infect  
  Volume 137 Issue 9 Pages 1217-1232  
  Keywords Animals; Animals, Domestic/microbiology; Campylobacter/drug effects/isolation & purification; Cattle; Chickens/microbiology; Colony Count, Microbial; Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial; Enterobacteriaceae/drug effects/isolation & purification; Food Industry; Food Microbiology; Health Food/microbiology; Humans; Prevalence; Sus scrofa/microbiology; Turkeys/microbiology; Pigs; Swine; Poultry; Chickens; Turkeys  
  Abstract The prevalences of zoonotic and potentially zoonotic bacteria or bacteria resistant to antimicrobials in organic and conventional poultry, swine and beef production were compared using systematic review and meta-analysis methodology. Thirty-eight articles were included in the review. The prevalence of Campylobacter was higher in organic broiler chickens at slaughter, but no difference in prevalence was observed in retail chicken. Campylobacter isolates from conventional retail chicken were more likely to be ciprofloxacin-resistant (odds ratio 9.62, 95% confidence interval 5.67-16.35). Bacteria isolated from conventional animal production exhibited a higher prevalence of resistance to antimicrobials; however, the recovery of some resistant strains was also identified in organic animal production, where there is an apparent reduced antimicrobial selection pressure. Limited or inconsistent research was identified in studies examining the prevalence of zoonotic and potentially zoonotic bacteria in other food-animal species. There is a need for further research of sufficient quality in this area.  
  Address Department of Population Medicine, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada. iyoung@uoguelph.ca  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2009/04/22  
  ISSN 0950-2688 (Print) 0950-2688 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes AGRICOLA, Biological Sciences, BioMed Central, CAB Abstracts, Current Contents, Environmental Sciences and Pollution Management, Food Science and Technology Abstracts, MEDLINE and Scopus searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 822 Serial 2650  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Yan, L.; Robinson, R.; Shi, Z.; Mann, G. doi  openurl
  Title Efficacy of progesterone supplementation during early pregnancy in cows: A meta-analysis Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Theriogenology Abbreviated Journal Theriogenology  
  Volume 85 Issue 8 Pages 1390-1398 e1  
  Keywords Cattle; Bovines; Fertility; Pregnancy Rate; Progesterone  
  Abstract Progesterone is a critical hormone during early pregnancy in the cow. As a result, a number of studies have investigated the effects of progesterone supplementation on pregnancy rates. In this study, a meta-analysis using a univariate binary random effects model was carried out on 84 specific treatments reported in 53 publications involving control (n = 9905) and progesterone-treated (n = 9135) cows. Although the results of individual studies showed wide variations (-40% to +50% point changes), progesterone treatment resulted in an overall increase in pregnancy rate odds ratio (OR = 1.12; P < 0.01). Improvements in pregnancy rate were only observed in cows treated at natural estrus (OR = 1.41, P < 0.01) and not following synchronization of estrus or ovulation. Although treatment between Days 3 to 7 postinsemination was beneficial (OR = 1.15; P < 0.01), treatment earlier or later than this was not. Progesterone supplementation was beneficial in cows of lower fertility (<45% control pregnancy rate) but not in cows with higher fertility. These results indicated that the benefit of progesterone supplementation on fertility of cows required exogenous progesterone supplementation to start between Day 3 to 7 and the appropriate reproductive status (i.e., lower fertility, natural estrus) of the treated cows.  
  Address Institute of Animal Science, Jiangsu Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Nanjing, Jiangsu, China. School of Veterinary Medicine and Science, University of Nottingham, Sutton Bonington Campus, Loughborough, Leicestershire, UK. Institute of Animal Science, Jiangsu Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Nanjing, Jiangsu, China. Electronic address: zdshi@jaas.ac.cn. Division of Animal Sciences, School of Biosciences, University of Nottingham, Sutton Bonington Campus, Loughborough, Leicestershire, UK. Electronic address: george.mann@nottingham.ac.uk.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2016/01/30  
  ISSN 1879-3231 (Electronic) 0093-691X (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Web of Science, PubMed, Science Direct and Google Scholar searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1427 Serial 2886  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Yakimicki, M.L.; Edwards, N.E.; Richards, E.; Beck, A.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Animal-Assisted Intervention and Dementia: A Systematic Review Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Clinical Nursing Research Abbreviated Journal Clin Nurs Res  
  Volume Issue Pages 1054773818756987  
  Keywords Animal-assisted therapy; Dogs; Canines; Dementia  
  Abstract This review discusses the relationship between animal-assisted interventions (AAI) and behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD). A systematic search was conducted within CINAHL, Web of Science CAB Abstracts, PubMed, Abstracts in Social Gerontology, Google Scholar, and PsycINFO for primary research articles. A total of 32 studies were included in the final review. Variation was noted in study designs and in study setting. Twenty-seven of 32 studies used dogs as the intervention. Agitation/aggression showed a significant decrease in nine of 15 studies. Eleven of 12 studies demonstrated increased social interaction with AAI. Mood had mixed results in nine studies. Quality of life was increased in three of four studies. Resident activity and nutritional intake were each increased in two studies. Animal assisted activities/interventions showed a strong positive effect on social behaviors, physical activity, and dietary intake in dementia patients and a positive effect on agitation/aggression and quality of life.  
  Address 1 Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, USA.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2018/02/15  
  ISSN 1552-3799 (Electronic) 1054-7738 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes CINAHL, Web of Science CAB Abstracts, PubMed, Abstracts in Social Gerontology, Google Scholar, and PsycINFO searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1678 Serial 2933  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Xavier, C.; Gonzales-Barron, U.; Paula, V.; Estevinho, L.; Cadavez, V. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Meta-analysis of the incidence of foodborne pathogens in Portuguese meats and their products Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Food Research International Abbreviated Journal Food Res Int  
  Volume 55 Issue Pages 311-323  
  Keywords Meat Produce [QQ030]; Other Produce [QQ070]; Food Science and Food Products (Human) [QQ000]; Food Contamination, Residues and Toxicology [QQ200]; Prion, Viral, Bacterial and Fungal Pathogens of Animals [LL821]; Prion, Viral, Bacterial and Fungal Pathogens of Humans [VV210]; Meat Producing Animals [LL120]; Food Service [QQ700]; broilers; chicken meat; convenience foods; cured meats; data analysis; food; food safety; foodborne diseases; foods; human diseases; hygiene; incidence; meat; meat products; meta-analysis; models; monitoring; pathogens; pigmeat; poultry; poultry meat; sausages; training; Campylobacter; Escherichia; Escherichia coli; fowls; Listeria monocytogenes; man; Salmonella; Staphylococcus; Staphylococcus aureus; Yersinia enterocolitica; Portugal; Gallus gallus; Gallus; Phasianidae; Galliformes; birds; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; eukaryotes; Campylobacteraceae; Campylobacterales; Epsilonproteobacteria; Proteobacteria; Bacteria; prokaryotes; Enterobacteriaceae; Enterobacteriales; Gammaproteobacteria; Homo; Hominidae; Primates; mammals; Listeria (Bacteria); Listeriaceae; Bacillales; Bacilli; Firmicutes; Developed Countries; European Union Countries; Mediterranean Region; OECD Countries; Southern Europe; Europe; Staphylococcaceae; Yersinia (Bacteria); bacterium; chickens; domesticated birds; E. coli; pork; pigs [Indexed using CAB Thesaurus terms]  
  Abstract Meat and meat products are the main vehicles of foodborne diseases in humans caused by pathogens such as Salmonella spp., Campylobacter spp., Listeria monocytogenes, Yersinia enterocolitica, verotoxigenic Escherichia coli (VTEC) and Staphylococcus aureus. In order to prioritise research on those microbial hazards, a meta-analysis study was conducted to summarise available information on the presence of such pathogens in meats produced in Portugal. By using a logit-transformed proportion as effect size parameterisation, a number of multilevel random-effect meta-analysis models were fitted to estimate mean occurrence rates of pathogens, and to compare them among meat categories (i.e., bovine meat, broiler meat, pork, minced beef and minced pork), and among meat product categories (i.e., intended to be eaten cooked, to be eaten raw and cured meats). The mean occurrence rate of Campylobacter in Portuguese broiler meat (40%; 95% CI: 22.0-61.4%) was about ten times higher than that of Salmonella (4.0%; 95% CI: 1.4-10.8%); although these levels were comparable to current EU ranges. Nevertheless, in the other meat categories, the meta-analysed incidences of Salmonella were slightly to moderately higher than EU averages. A semi-quantitative risk ranking of pathogens in Portuguese-produced pork pointed Salmonella spp. as critical (with a mean occurrence of 12.6%; 95% CI: 8.0-19.3%), and Y. enterocolitica as high (6.8%; 95% CI: 2.2-19.3%). In the case of the Portuguese meat products, the non-compliance to EU microbiological criteria for L. monocytogenes (8.8%; 95% CI: 6.5-11.8%) and Salmonella spp. (9.7%; 95% CI: 7.0-13.4%) at sample units level, in the categories 'intended to be eaten cooked' and 'to be eaten raw', were considerably higher than EU levels for ready-to-eat products in comparable categories. S. aureus was the pathogen of greatest concern given its high occurrence (22.6%; 95% CI: 15.4-31.8%) in meat products. These results emphasised the necessity of Portuguese food safety agencies to take monitoring, and training actions for the maintenance of good hygiene practices during the production of the great variety of traditional meat products. This meta-analysis study also highlighted important gaps of knowledge, and may assist food safety authorities in the prioritisation of microbiological hazards, and the implementation of essential food safety assurance systems at primary production.  
  Address CIMO Mountain Research Centre, School of Agriculture (ESA), Polytechnic Institute of Braganza, Braganza, Portugal. ubarron@ipb.pt  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0963-9969 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Web of Science and Google searched. (Also mentions searching Web of Knowledge, which is a search interface, not a defined database). Database record copyright CAB International 2010 Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1205 Serial 2697  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Wylie, C.E.; Collins, S.N.; Verheyen, K.L.; Richard Newton, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Frequency of equine laminitis: a systematic review with quality appraisal of published evidence Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Veterinary Journal (London, England : 1997) Abbreviated Journal Vet J  
  Volume 189 Issue 3 Pages 248-256  
  Keywords Animals; Foot Diseases/epidemiology/pathology/physiopathology/veterinary; Hoof and Claw/pathology/physiopathology; Horse Diseases/epidemiology/pathology/physiopathology; Horses; Incidence; Prevalence; Research Design/standards  
  Abstract Equine laminitis is a highly debilitating disease of the foot. Despite its perceived importance, epidemiological characteristics are poorly understood and the true frequency of the disease remains unclear. The objective of this study was to retrospectively assess previous research to identify publications which provide the best evidence of the frequency of naturally-occurring equine laminitis. A systematic review of English language publications was conducted using MEDLINE (1950-2010), CAB Direct (1910-2010) and IVIS (1997-2010). Additional publications were included by searching bibliographies. Search terms included laminitis, equine, frequency, prevalence and incidence. Studies that allowed frequency estimations to be made for naturally-occurring equine laminitis were included. Information was extracted using predefined data fields, including 13 study quality indicators. Sixty-nine publications were appraised. Ten were considered to provide the most reliable information, estimating the frequency of equine laminitis ranging from 1.5% to 34%. Previous publications estimating laminitis frequency were generally poor quality. Laminitis frequency varied across publications however the publications included in this review focussed on many of the different underlying laminitis aetiologies and comparison of the frequencies between groups would be inappropriate. High-quality evidence-based studies are needed to estimate the true disease frequency in different equine populations.  
  Address Epidemiology Department, Centre for Preventive Medicine, Animal Health Trust, Lanwades Park, Kentford, Newmarket, Suffolk, UK. claire.wylie@aht.org.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2011/06/15  
  ISSN 1532-2971 (Electronic) 1090-0233 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, CAB Direct (CAB Abstracts?) and IVIS searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 821 Serial 2649  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Wylie, C.E.; Collins, S.N.; Verheyen, K.L.; Newton, J.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Risk factors for equine laminitis: a systematic review with quality appraisal of published evidence Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Veterinary Journal (London, England : 1997) Abbreviated Journal Vet J  
  Volume 193 Issue 1 Pages 58-66  
  Keywords Animals; Foot Diseases/epidemiology/pathology/physiopathology/veterinary; Hoof and Claw/pathology/physiopathology; Horse Diseases/epidemiology/pathology/physiopathology; Horses; Research Design/standards; Risk Factors  
  Abstract Epidemiological studies into the risk factors for naturally-occurring equine laminitis are limited. There are a small number of such studies, although the results are inconsistent and remain disputed. The reasons for the conflicting results remain unclear. The aim of this review was to critically evaluate previous research in order to identify publications which provide the best evidence of risk factors for naturally-occurring equine laminitis. A systematic review of English language publications was conducted using MEDLINE (1950-2010), CAB Direct (1910-2010) and IVIS (1997-2010). Additional publications were included by searching bibliographies. Search terms included laminitis, equine, risk factors and epidemiology. Publications which compared a case population to a control population and made inferences about parameters as risk factors for naturally-occurring equine laminitis were included. Information was extracted using predefined data fields, including 18 study quality indicators. In total, 17 publications were fully appraised. Six were considered to provide the most reliable information about risk factors for naturally-occurring laminitis. Information on signalment was well researched and there was good evidence for an association with chronic laminitis and increasing age. There remain inconsistent results for many other horse-level risk factors including gender, breed and bodyweight. Previous publications estimating risk factors for equine laminitis were of reasonable quality, although they were limited in the number and scope of the risk factors studied. High-quality, evidence-based studies are needed to identify further risk factors and to establish consensus over previously identified risk factors for different equine populations.  
  Address Epidemiology Department, Centre for Preventive Medicine, Animal Health Trust, Lanwades Park, Kentford, Newmarket, Suffolk, UK. claire.wylie@aht.org.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2011/11/23  
  ISSN 1532-2971 (Electronic) 1090-0233 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, CAB Direct (CAB Abstracts) and IVIS searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 847 Serial 2648  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Wylie, C.E.; Carbonell-Antonanzas, M.; Aiassa, E.; Dhollander, S.; Zagmutt, F.J.; Brodbelt, D.C.; Solano-Gallego, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A systematic review of the efficacy of prophylactic control measures for naturally-occurring canine leishmaniosis, part I: Vaccinations Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Preventive Veterinary Medicine Abbreviated Journal Prev Vet Med  
  Volume 117 Issue 1 Pages 7-18  
  Keywords Dogs  
  Abstract Canine leishmaniosis (CanL) is an important zoonotic disease; however, the efficacy of available vaccines for the prevention of naturally-occurring Leishmania infantum (L. infantum) infection in dogs remains unclear. The objective of this review was to determine the efficacy of currently available vaccines to prevent naturally-occurring L. infantum infection in dogs. Four bibliographic databases (CAB Direct 2011, Web of Science 2011, U.S. National Library of Medicine 2011 and Literatura Latino Americana e do Caribe em Ciencias da Saude) were searched along with eight sets of conference proceedings and the International Veterinary Information Service (IVIS) database, from 1980 to November 2012. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs), non-randomised clinical trials (NRCTs), cohort studies and case-control studies that investigated vaccine efficacy for natural L. infantum infection in dogs were eligible for inclusion. Two review authors independently assessed each study against the inclusion criteria, independently extracted relevant data from all included studies and assessed the risk of methodological shortcomings in each individual study. The odds ratio (OR) and absolute risk reduction (ARR) for dichotomous outcomes and mean difference for continuous outcomes were calculated. Meta-analysis was not performed due to heterogeneity of the studies identified. The search was conducted for all mitigations for CanL and yielded the title and abstract of 937 articles, from which 84 articles were screened based on full text. Twelve studies on vaccinations (five RCTs, seven NRCTs) were identified. Ten studies were at a high risk of methodological shortcomings, whilst two were at an unclear risk. The use of 200mug ALM protein, Leishmune(R), CaniLeish(R), LiESAp with MDP, and ALM with BCG tended to significantly reduce the proportion of dogs infected with L. infantum based on either parasitological or serological evidence. The use of lyophilized protein vaccine significantly increased the proportion of dogs infected with L. infantum based on either parasitological or serological evidence. There is peer-reviewed evidence that control measures are effective in preventing CanL with the results suggesting that between 6 and 54% of infections could be prevented with vaccination. However, this evidence is based on a small number of RCTs, all of which are either at high or unclear risk of methodological shortcomings. Well-designed, adequately powered and properly reported randomised clinical trials are needed to clearly establish efficacy of vaccines as CanL control measures.  
  Address Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Departament de Medicina i Cirurgia Animal, Campus Bellaterra, Edifici V, Cerdanyola del Valles, Barcelona, Spain. Electronic address: claire.wylie@rossdales.com. European Food Safety Authority, Via Carlo Magno 1/A, IT-43126 Parma, Italy. Epichi Analytics, 1643 Spruce Street, Boulder, CO 80302, USA. Veterinary Epidemiology, Economics and Public Health Group, Department of Production and Population Health, Royal Veterinary College, North Mymms, Hatfield, Hertfordshire, UK.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2014/07/31  
  ISSN 1873-1716 (Electronic) 0167-5877 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes CAB Direct (CAB Abstracts?), Web of Science, MEDLINE and LILACS searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1239 Serial 2728  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Wylie, C.E.; Carbonell-Antonanzas, M.; Aiassa, E.; Dhollander, S.; Zagmutt, F.J.; Brodbelt, D.C.; Solano-Gallego, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A systematic review of the efficacy of prophylactic control measures for naturally occurring canine leishmaniosis. Part II: Topically applied insecticide treatments and prophylactic medications Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Preventive Veterinary Medicine Abbreviated Journal Prev Vet Med  
  Volume 117 Issue 1 Pages 19-27  
  Keywords Dogs  
  Abstract The objective of this study was to systematically review the efficacy of topically applied insecticide treatments of dogs (impregnated collars, spot-ons), and prophylactic medications to prevent natural Leishmania infantum (L. infantum) infection in dogs. Randomised controlled trials (RCT), non-randomised clinical trials, cohort studies and case-control studies that investigated preventive efficacy for natural L. infantum infection in dogs were eligible for inclusion. Two review authors independently assessed each study against the inclusion criteria, independently extracted relevant data from all included studies and assessed the risk of methodological shortcomings in each individual study. The odds ratio (OR) and absolute risk reduction (ARR) for dichotomous outcomes and mean difference for continuous outcomes were calculated. Meta-analysis was not performed due to heterogeneity of the studies identified. The search yielded 937 articles, from which 84 full text articles were selected for second stage screening. Eleven eligible studies were included; four on collars (two RCTs), three on spot-ons (two RCTs – one looking at two different dosing regimens), three on prophylactic medications (all RCTs) and one on both collars and spot-ons summarised in this paper. All of the studies were considered to be at a high risk of methodological shortcomings, with the exception of one spot-on study which was considered to be at an unclear risk of methodological shortcomings. Deltamethrin collars, 65% permethrin, 10% imidacloprid with 50% permethrin spot-ons and domperidone prophylactic medication tended to significantly reduce the proportion of dogs infected with L. infantum based on either parasitological or serological evidence.  
  Address Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Departament de Medicina i Cirurgia Animal, Campus Bellaterra, Edifici V, Cerdanyola del Valles, Barcelona, Spain. Electronic address: claire.wylie@rossdales.com. European Food Safety Authority, Via Carlo Magno 1/A, IT-43126 Parma, Italy. Epichi Analytics, 1643 Spruce Street, Boulder, CO 80302, USA. Veterinary Epidemiology, Economics and Public Health Group, Department of Production and Population Health, Royal Veterinary College, North Mymms, Hatfield, Hertfordshire, UK.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2014/07/27  
  ISSN 1873-1716 (Electronic) 0167-5877 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes CAB Direct (CAB Abstracts?), Web of Science, MEDLINE and LILACS searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1240 Serial 2729  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Wolfger, B.; Timsit, E.; White, B.J.; Orsel, K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A Systematic Review of Bovine Respiratory Disease Diagnosis Focused on Diagnostic Confirmation, Early Detection, and Prediction of Unfavorable Outcomes in Feedlot Cattle Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication The Veterinary Clinics of North America. Food Animal Practice Abbreviated Journal Vet Clin North Am Food Anim Pract  
  Volume 31 Issue 3 Pages 351-365  
  Keywords Cattle: Respiratory; Diagnosis  
  Abstract A large proportion of newly arrived feedlot cattle are affected with bovine respiratory disease (BRD). Economic losses could be reduced by accurate, early detection. This review evaluates the available literature regarding BRD confirmatory diagnostic tests, early detection methods, and modalities to estimate post-therapeutic prognosis or predict unfavorable or fatal outcomes. Scientific evidence promotes the use of haptoglobin to confirm BRD status. Feeding behavior, infrared thermography, and reticulorumen boluses are promising methods. Retrospective analyses of routinely collected treatment and cohort data can be used to identify cattle at risk of unfavorable outcome. Other methods have been reviewed but require further study.  
  Address Department of Production Animal Health, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Calgary, 3330 Hospital Drive Northwest, Calgary, Alberta T2N-4N1, Canada. Electronic address: bwolfger@ucalgary.ca. Department of Production Animal Health, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Calgary, 3330 Hospital Drive Northwest, Calgary, Alberta T2N-4N1, Canada. Department of Clinical Sciences, Kansas State University, Mosier Hall Q 211, 1800 Denison Avenue, Manhattan, KS 66506, USA.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2015/07/27  
  ISSN 1558-4240 (Electronic) 0749-0720 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes CAB Abstracts and PubMed searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1359 Serial 2830  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print

Save Citations:
Export Records: