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Author Van Donkersgoed, J. url  openurl
  Title Meta-analysis of field trials of antimicrobial mass medication for prophylaxis of bovine respiratory disease in feedlot cattle Type Journal Article
  Year 1992 Publication Canadian Veterinary Journal Abbreviated Journal Can Vet J  
  Volume 33 Issue 12 Pages 786-795  
  Keywords Cattle  
  Abstract One hundred and seven field trials of prophylactic mass medication for bovine respiratory disease (BRD) in feedlot cattle were reviewed. Meta-analysis is the formal quantitative statistical review process that was used to synthesize the data from randomized field trials and draw conclusions concerning the efficacy of prophylactic mass medication in feedlot calves.The results of the meta-analysis indicated that prophylactic parenteral mass medication of calves with long-acting oxytetracycline or tilmicosin on arrival at the feedlot would reduce BRD morbidity rates (p < 0.001). There were, however, unreliable data on the effects of mass medication on mortality rates and performance, insufficient data on the most effective treatment regimes, and no valid data on the efficacy of feed and water medication for prophylaxis of BRD.This review highlights the gaps in our knowledge and points out the need for additional well-designed randomized controlled field trials of adequate size to assess the efficacy and socioeconomic impact of prophylactic mass medication for BRD in feedlot cattle.  
  Address (up)  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 1992/12/01  
  ISSN 0008-5286 (Print) 0008-5286 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes MEDLINE, CAB Abstracts, Procite and Current Contents searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 804 Serial 2627  
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Author International Livestock Research Institute url  openurl
  Title Mapping of poverty and likely zoonoses hotspots Type Report
  Year 2012 Publication Mapping of poverty and likely zoonoses hotspots, Zoonoses Project 4, Report to Department for International Development, UK Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 119 pp  
  Keywords Agricultural Economics [EE110] Veterinary Economics [EE117] Health Economics [EE118] Income and Poverty [EE950] Prion, Viral, Bacterial and Fungal Pathogens of Animals [LL821] Protozoan, Helminth, Mollusc and Arthropod Parasites of Animals [LL822] Meteorology and Climate [PP500] Prion, Viral, Bacterial and Fungal Pathogens of Humans [VV210] Protozoan, Helminth and Arthropod Parasites of Humans [VV220] Occupational Health and Safety [VV900] agroecological zones animal diseases animal production climate change disease transmission emerging infectious diseases farmers human diseases infectious diseases livestock mapping occupational hazards poverty productivity zoonoses man Developing Countries countries Homo Hominidae Primates mammals vertebrates Chordata animals eukaryotes; [Indexed using CAB Thesaurus terms]  
  Abstract This report aims to present data and expert knowledge on poverty and zoonoses hotspots to inform prioritization of study areas on the transmission of disease in emerging livestock systems in the developing world, where prevention of zoonotic disease might bring greatest benefit to poor people. The first chapter reviews the substantial literature on prioritizing disease and identifies prioritization criteria relevant to this study, namely: burden of human disease; impacts on livestock production and productivity; amenability to agricultural intervention; and, concern because of emergence or severity. This allowed the identification of 24 zoonoses of high importance to poor people, 13 of which were investigated in depth. The next chapter reviews current evidence on poverty and livestock, on livestock systems and their dynamics, and on zoonoses and how they are currently mapped. The map of poor livestock keepers is updated and an additional map based on subnational data is presented. Maps of livestock systems that are changing most rapidly in response to emerging markets are also presented, and vulnerability to climate change is described. The strengths and weaknesses of different maps are noted. The next chapter presents evidence from a systematic review of over 1000 studies on the prevalence of the 13 priority zoonoses in people and animals. It focuses on the endemic zoonoses that impose greatest burden and a 'top 20' list is given of geographical hotspots. Data on zoonoses are also extracted from the WHO Global Burden of Disease and the 'top 20' countries identified. A case study that compares our systematic review with an 'in-country review' focusing on grey literature and literature in a language other than English is included. Some of the challenges of the study and caution in interpreting the results are discussed. The next chapter updates the map of emerging disease events. For the first time, emerging zoonoses are mapped as distinct from other emerging disease events. The last chapter provides maps of regional agroecosystems and summarizes numbers of livestock, people and poor livestock keepers by system as well as the zoonoses context. It also draws some global conclusions from the study.  
  Address (up)  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher ILRI Place of Publication Nairobi Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, CAB Direct (CAB Abstracts?), Google and Google Scholar searched. Database record copyright CAB International 2010. Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1166 Serial 2662  
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Author Artemiou, E.; Adams, C.L.; Toews, L.; Violato, C.; Coe, J.B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Informing web-based communication curricula in veterinary education: A systematic review of web-based methods used for teaching and assessing clinical communication in medical education Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Journal of Veterinary Medical Education Abbreviated Journal J Vet Med Educ  
  Volume 41 Issue 1 Pages 44-54  
  Keywords Clinical Competence; Communication; Education, Medical/methods; Education, Medical/standards; Education, Veterinary/methods; Education, Veterinary/standards; Educational Measurement; Humans; Internet; Learning; Students; Teaching/methods  
  Abstract We determined the Web-based configurations that are applied to teach medical and veterinary communication skills, evaluated their effectiveness, and suggested future educational directions for Web-based communication teaching in veterinary education. We performed a systematic search of CAB Abstracts, MEDLINE, Scopus, and ERIC limited to articles published in English between 2000 and 2012. The review focused on medical or veterinary undergraduate to clinical- or residency-level students. We selected studies for which the study population was randomized to the Web-based learning (WBL) intervention with a posttest comparison with another WBL or non-WBL method and that reported at least one empirical outcome. Two independent reviewers completed relevancy screening, data extraction, and synthesis of results using Kirkpatrick and Kirkpatrick's framework. The search retrieved 1,583 articles, and 10 met the final inclusion criteria. We identified no published articles on Web-based communication platforms in veterinary medicine; however, publications summarized from human medicine demonstrated that WBL provides a potentially reliable and valid approach for teaching and assessing communication skills. Student feedback on the use of virtual patients for teaching clinical communication skills has been positive, though evidence has suggested that practice with virtual patients prompted lower relation-building responses. Empirical outcomes indicate that WBL is a viable method for expanding the approach to teaching history taking and possibly to additional tasks of the veterinary medical interview.  
  Address (up)  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2014/01/15  
  ISSN 0748-321X (Print) 0748-321X (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes MEDLINE, CAB Abstracts, ERIC and Scopus searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1194 Serial 2688  
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Author Finka, L.R.; Ellis, S.L.; Stavisky, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A critically appraised topic (CAT) to compare the effects of single and multi-cat housing on physiological and behavioural measures of stress in domestic cats in confined environments Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication BMC Veterinary Research Abbreviated Journal BMC Vet Res  
  Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages 73  
  Keywords Animals; Cat Diseases/etiology; Cat Diseases/prevention & control; Cats/physiology; Cats/psychology; Housing, Animal/standards; Stress, Psychological/etiology; Stress, Psychological/prevention & control; Cats  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Domestic cats have evolved from solitary, asocial predators and whilst they may display social behaviours, they can still exist as solitary survivors. Over-population and relinquishment of pet cats are ubiquitous problems worldwide, and rehoming centres (also known as rescues/ shelters) aim to ameliorate this by holding cats in confinement for a variable period until a new home is found. The provision of optimal housing for large numbers of cats in close confinement, such as in rehoming centres, is therefore inherently difficult. Under these conditions there is the potential for individuals to develop signs of physical and psychological ill health, and thus experience compromised welfare. Available information regarding housing practices that maximise welfare currently provides conflicting results, and as a consequence there are no unanimous housing recommendations. The aim of this study was therefore to review the evidence on the impact of single housing compared to multi-cat housing on stress in confined cats, as measured by physiological and/or behavioural outcomes. The review was conducted using a Critically Appraised Topic (CAT) format. A systematic search of electronic databases (CAB Abstracts, Zoological Records and Medline) was carried out to identify peer-reviewed literature comparing single and multi-cat housing in confined environments. RESULTS: A total of 959 papers were initially identified, six of which met sufficient criteria based on their relevance to be included within this review. All of the studies had significant limitations in design and methodology, including a lack of information on how groups were assigned, inconsistent handling and enrichment provision between groups, and lack of information on the socialisation status of cats. CONCLUSIONS: Whilst some studies suggested that single housing may be less stressful for cats, others suggested group housing was less stressful. Several other important factors were however identified as potential mediators of stress within the different housing systems, and recommendations based upon these findings are presented.  
  Address (up)  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2014/03/25  
  ISSN 1746-6148 (Electronic) 1746-6148 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes CAB Abstracts, Zoological Record and MEDLINE searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1210 Serial 2701  
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Author Newman, J. url  openurl
  Title Human-directed dog aggression: A systematic review Type Book Whole
  Year 2012 Publication Thesis Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords dogs; aggression; bite; behaviour; epidemiology; risk factor  
  Abstract Human-directed dog aggression is a worldwide issue with major public health and animal welfare implications. Consequences for the target of aggression range from fear and minor injury, to life threatening injury and death, and for the dog impaired freedoms, restricted interactions and ultimately euthanasia. The systematic review undertaken here aimed to identify and assimilate all robust evidence regarding factors that affect the risk of human-directed dog aggression. Such information is vital for the development of sound preventive strategies. Multiple electronic literature databases were interrogated in order to identify all evidence for risk factors of human-directed dog aggression. The search strategy was designed to minimise the risk of publication and language biases, specificity was sacrificed for sensitivity. The threshold for acceptance of evidence was predetermined at a moderate level; any study that provided evidence with a low risk of confounding and bias and a moderate probability that any relationship identified was causal would reach the final review. Appraisal examined methodological quality, study design, selection process, measurement of outcome and exposures, and type and quality of analysis. All stages of appraisal were undertaken blind to the study findings. On assimilating the evidence identified, no robust evidence for any risk factors of human-directed dog aggression was identified. Eight studies provided a moderate level of somewhat conflicting evidence. Amongst those studies appraised as failing to reach the moderate level of acceptable evidence, the majority were excluded as a result of multiple limitations. It is vital that future research is undertaken to a high methodological standard in order that it provides robust evidence for the effect of any risk factor identified.  
  Address (up)  
  Corporate Author Thesis Master's thesis  
  Publisher University of Liverpool Place of Publication Liverpool Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Master of Philosophy Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Department of Veterinary Clinical Science Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1265 Serial 2753  
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Author Tadesse, G.; Tessema, T.S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A meta-analysis of the prevalence of Salmonella in food animals in Ethiopia Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication BMC Microbiology Abbreviated Journal BMC Microbiol  
  Volume 14 Issue 1 Pages 270  
  Keywords Salmonella; Pigs; Swine; Cattle; Sheep; Goats  
  Abstract Background The globalization of the food supply and the increased movements of people, animals and goods have increased the threat of Salmonella infections in several countries. The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of Salmonella in food animals in Ethiopia by using meta-analytical methods. Results The prevalence of Salmonella in slaughtered cattle, sheep, goats and pigs were 7.07%, 8.41%, 9.01% and 43.81% respectively. The occurrence of Salmonella was significantly higher in pigs than in slaughtered true ruminants (p <0.001) but not significantly different between cattle, sheep and goats (p >0. 05). S. Mishmarhaemek, S. Infantis and S. Hadar were the predominant isolates in cattle, small ruminants and pigs respectively. S. Typhimurium was isolated from all host species. Conclusions All food animals are considerable reservoirs of Salmonella and pose a significant risk to public health. Safety measures in slaughter houses and butcheries and education of the public could reduce the risk of transmission of Salmonella from animals to humans.  
  Address (up)  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2014/11/16  
  ISSN 1471-2180 (Electronic) 1471-2180 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes MEDLINE and Google Scholar searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1282 Serial 2769  
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Author Liu, Y.; Li, J.; Lovendahl, P.; Schmidt, M.; Larsen, K.; Callesen, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title In vitro manipulation techniques of porcine embryos: a meta-analysis related to transfers, pregnancies and piglets Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Reproduction, Fertility, and Development Abbreviated Journal Reprod Fertil Dev  
  Volume 27 Issue 3 Pages 429-439  
  Keywords Pigs; Swine; Piglets; Embryos  
  Abstract During the last 17 years, considerable advancements have been achieved in the production of pigs, transgenic and non-transgenic, by methods of somatic cell nuclear transfer, in vitro fertilisation, intracytoplasmic sperm injection, microinjection and sperm-mediated gene transfer by artificial insemination. Therefore, a review of the overall efficiency for the developmental competence of embryos produced by these in vitro methods would be useful in order to obtain a more thorough overview of this growing area with respect to its development and present status. In this review a meta-analysis was used to analyse data collected from all published articles with a focus on zygotes and embryos for transfer, pregnancy, full-term development and piglets born. It was generally concluded that an increasing level of in vitro manipulation of porcine embryos decreased the overall efficiency for production of piglets. The techniques of nuclear transfer have been developed markedly through the increasing number of studies performed, and the results have become more stable. Prolonged in vitro culture period did not lead to any negative effect on nuclear transfer embryos after their transfer and it resulted in a similar or even higher litter size. More complete information is needed in future scientific articles about these in vitro manipulation techniques to establish a more solid basis for the evaluation of their status and to reveal and further investigate any eventual problems.  
  Address (up)  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2014/12/09  
  ISSN 1031-3613 (Electronic) 1031-3613 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1295 Serial 2780  
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Author Scotney, R.L.; McLaughlin, D.; Keates, H.L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A systematic review of the effects of euthanasia and occupational stress in personnel working with animals in animal shelters, veterinary clinics, and biomedical research facilities Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Journal of the American Veterinary Medicine Association Abbreviated Journal J Am Vet Med Assoc  
  Volume 247 Issue 10 Pages 1121-1130  
  Keywords veterinary surgeons; Veterinarians; Stress; Shelter Medicine; Euthanaisa  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: The study of occupational stress and compassion fatigue in personnel working in animal-related occupations has gained momentum over the last decade. However, there remains incongruence in understanding what is currently termed compassion fatigue and the associated unique contributory factors. Furthermore, there is minimal established evidence of the likely influence of these conditions on the health and well-being of individuals working in various animal-related occupations. OBJECTIVE: To assess currently available evidence and terminology regarding occupational stress and compassion fatigue in personnel working in animal shelters, veterinary clinics, and biomedical research facilities. DATA SOURCE: Studies were identified by searching the following electronic databases with no publication date restrictions: ProQuest Research Library, ProQuest Social Science Journals, PsycARTICLES, Web of Science, Science Direct, Scopus, PsychINFO databases, and Google Scholar. Search terms included (euthanasia AND animals) OR (compassion fatigue AND animals) OR (occupational stress AND animals). STUDY APPRAISAL AND SYNTHESIS: Only articles published in English in peer-reviewed journals that included use of quantitative or qualitative techniques to investigate the incidence of occupational stress or compassion fatigue in the veterinary profession or animal-related occupations were included. On the basis of predefined criteria, 1 author extracted articles, and the data set was then independently reviewed by the other 2 authors. RESULTS: 12 articles met the selection criteria and included a variety of study designs and methods of data analysis. Seven studies evaluated animal shelter personnel, with the remainder evaluating veterinary nurses and technicians (2), biomedical research technicians (1), and personnel in multiple animal-related occupations (2). There was a lack of consistent terminology and agreed definitions for the articles reviewed. Personnel directly engaged in euthanasia reported significantly higher levels of work stress and lower levels of job satisfaction, which may have resulted in higher employee turnover, psychological distress, and other stress-related conditions. LIMITATIONS AND CONCLUSIONS: Results of this review suggested a high incidence of occupational stress and euthanasia-related strain in animal care personnel. The disparity of nomenclature and heterogeneity of research methods may contribute to general misunderstanding and confusion and impede the ability to generate high-quality evidence regarding the unique stressors experienced by personnel working with animals. The present systematic review provided insufficient foundation from which to identify consistent causal factors and outcomes to use as a basis for development of evidence-based stress management programs, and it highlights the need for further research.  
  Address (up)  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2015/11/01  
  ISSN 1943-569X (Electronic) 0003-1488 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes ProQuest Research Library, ProQuest Social Science Journals, PsycARTICLES, Web of Science, Science Direct, Scopus, PsychINFO databases, and Google Scholar searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1376 Serial 2843  
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Author Gadberry, M.S.; Hawley, J.; Beck, P.A.; Jennings, J.A.; Kegley, E.B.; Coffey, K.P. doi  openurl
  Title BILL E. KUNKLE INTERDISCIPLINARY BEEF SYMPOSIUM: A meta-analysis of research efforts aimed at reducing the impact of fescue toxicosis on cattle weight gain and feed intake Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Journal of Animal Science Abbreviated Journal J Anim Sci  
  Volume 93 Issue 12 Pages 5496-5505  
  Keywords Cattle; Bovines; Fescue  
  Abstract The objective of this paper is to present a systematic review and meta-analysis of research efforts aimed at recovering cattle production losses attributed to toxic endophyte-infected [ (Morgan-Jones & Gams.) Glenn, Bacon, & Hanlin comb. Nov.] tall fescue [ (Schreb.) Darbysh.]. The strategies presented include those 1) applied with forage systems, 2) based on pharmacological compounds and functional foods, and 3) based on supplemental dietary nutrients. Cattle BW gain and DM intake was the dependent response evaluated. Among the forage systems reviewed, studies with nontoxic, endophyte-infected tall fescue as a total replacement forage system demonstrated the greatest improvement in per-hectare (152 +/- 27.5 kg/ha) and per-animal (0.29 +/- 0.03 kg/d) BW gain. Studies with interseeded legumes have exhibited a small and highly variable BW gain effect size per hectare (52 +/- 24.1 kg/ha) and per animal (0.11 +/- 0.03 kg/d). The legume response was seasonal, with summer exhibiting the greatest benefit. Studies with chemicals that suppress plant growth demonstrated BW gain responses (0.17 +/- 0.06 kg/d) equal to or greater than the response observed with legume studies. Cattle grazing toxic tall fescue responded well to anthelmentics, antimicrobial feed additives, and steroid implants, and the use of these technologies may additively help recover production losses. As a group, functional foods have not improved BW gain ( = 0.85). Studies with cattle supplemented with highly digestible fiber supplements observed a 0.15 kg greater BW gain compared with studies using starch- and sugar-based supplements ( < 0.05). Weight gain was positively impacted by the level of supplementation (0.06 kg/DM intake as percent BW). Supplement feed conversion was estimated at 6:1 for the highly digestible fiber supplements compared with 11:1 for starch-based supplements. Tall fescue forage DM intake was predicted to maximize at a supplemental feeding rate of 0.24% BW with a breakpoint at 0.5% BW, and total maximum DM intake (forage plus supplement) occurred at 2.7% BW when supplemental feeding approached 0.9% BW. Results from this meta-analysis should be useful for 1) establishing and comparing measured responses to theoretical improvements in BW gain when additive strategies are considered, 2) research planning, and 3) producer education.  
  Address (up)  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2015/12/08  
  ISSN 1525-3163 (Electronic) 0021-8812 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Agricola and Google Scholar searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1393 Serial 2858  
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Author White, R.R.; Miller, P.S.; Hanigan, M.D. doi  openurl
  Title Evaluating equations estimating change in swine feed intake during heat and cold stress Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Journal of Animal Science Abbreviated Journal J Anim Sci  
  Volume 93 Issue 11 Pages 5395-5410  
  Keywords Pigs; Swine; Heat stress; Feed intake  
  Abstract The objectives of this study were to evaluate heat stress feed intake models for growing swine using a data set assembled from the literature and to develop a series of new equations modeling the influence of the thermal environment and interactions between the thermal environmental and other factors on feed intake. A literature survey was conducted to identify studies assessing intake responses to temperature. The resulting data set comprised 35 studies containing 120 comparisons to thermoneutral intake. Intake as a fraction of thermoneutral intake (FFI) was the primary response variable, where a value of 1 represented no change from thermoneutral intake. The FFI predicted by NRC and a recent model from a meta-analysis (Renaudeau et al.,) were compared to observed values. New parameters for the NRC equation (NRCmod) were derived, and a series of new equations incorporating duration of exposure (TD), temperature cycling (TC), and floor type (TH) were also derived. Root-mean-square prediction error (RMSPE) and concordance correlation coefficients were used to evaluate all models. The RMSPE for the NRC model was 23.6 with mean and slope bias accounting for 12.6% and 51.1% of prediction error, respectively. The TD, TC, and TH models had reduced RMSPE compared with NRC: 12.9 for TD, 12.6 for TC, and 12.9 for TS. Substantial improvements were also made by refitting parameters (NRCmod; RMSPE 13.0%). In NRCmod, TD, TC, and TH, random error was the predominant source, accounting for over 97% of prediction error. The Renaudeau et al. model was also evaluated. Renaudeau et al. had relatively low RMSPE (22.3) for intake but higher RMSPE for FFI (22.6) than NRC, NRCmod, TD, TC, or TH. Additional parameters were derived for the Renaudeau et al. equation to account for housing system and diet characteristics. This adjustment reduced RMSPE of predicting feed intake (16.0) and FFI (16.3) and reduced systematic bias in the equation. This evaluation of equations highlights the effects of novel explanatory variables on feed intake during heat stress, and the comparison can be useful when selecting a model that best explains variability in feed intake responses to heat stress given available input data.  
  Address (up)  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2015/12/08  
  ISSN 1525-3163 (Electronic) 0021-8812 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes AGRICOLA searched Approved no  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1394 Serial 2859  
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Author Abell, K.M.; Theurer, M.E.; Larson, R.L.; White, B.J.; Apley, M. doi  openurl
  Title A mixed treatment comparison meta-analysis of metaphylaxis treatments for bovine respiratory disease in beef cattle Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Animal Science Abbreviated Journal J Anim Sci  
  Volume 95 Issue 2 Pages 626-635  
  Keywords Cattle: Cows; Calves; Bovine; Respiratory diseases; Antimicrobials  
  Abstract The objective of this project was to evaluate the effects of antimicrobials approved for parenteral metaphylactic use in feeder and stocker calves on morbidity and mortality for bovine respiratory disease with the use of a mixed treatment comparison meta-analysis. An initial literature review was conducted in April 2016 through Pubmed, Agricola, and CAB (Commonwealth Agricultural Bureau) for randomized controlled trials for metaphylaxis antimicrobial administered parentally to incoming feedlot or stocker calves within 48 h of arrival. The final list of publications included 29 studies, with a total of 37 trials. There were 8 different metaphylactic antimicrobials. Final event outcomes were categorized into bovine respiratory disease (BRD) morbidity cumulative incidence d 1 to </= 60 of the feeding period, BRD morbidity cumulative incidence d 1 to closeout of the feeding period, BRD mortality cumulative incidence d 1 to closeout of the feeding period, and BRD retreatment cumulative incidence morbidity d 1 to closeout of the feeding period. Network meta-analysis combined direct and indirect evidence for all the event outcomes to determine mean odds ratio (OR) with 95% credibility intervals (CrIs) for all metaphylactic antimicrobial comparisons. The “upper tier” treatment arms for morbidity d 1 to </= 60 included tulathromycin, gamithromycin, and tilmicosin. For BRD mortality cumulative incidence d 1 to closeout and BRD retreatment morbidity d 1 to closeout, classifying the treatment arms into tiers was not possible due to overlapping 95% CrIs. The results of this project accurately identified differences between metaphylactic antimicrobials, and metaphylactic antimicrobial options appear to offer different outcomes on BRD morbidity and mortality odds in feedlot cattle.  
  Address (up)  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2017/04/06  
  ISSN 1525-3163 (Electronic) 0021-8812 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Pubmed, Agricola, and CAB searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1448 Serial 2904  
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Author Zeiler, F.A.; Sader, N.; Gillman, L.M.; Teitelbaum, J.; West, M.; Kazina, C.J. doi  openurl
  Title The Cerebrovascular Response to Ketamine: A Systematic Review of the Animal and Human Literature Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Journal of Neurosurgical Anesthesiology Abbreviated Journal J Neurosurg Anesthesiol  
  Volume Epublication ahead of print Issue Pages  
  Keywords Animal models; Mice; Rats; Ketamine  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: The aim of the study was to perform a systematic review of the literature on the cerebrovascular/cerebral blood flow (CBF) effects of ketamine in both animal and human subjects. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We searched MEDLINE, BIOSIS, EMBASE, Global Health, SCOPUS, and Cochrane Library from inception to December 2014. Two reviewers independently identified all manuscripts pertaining to the administration of ketamine in both human and animal subjects in which the impact on CBF/cerebral vasculature was recorded by means of functional magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, single-photon emission computed tomography, xenon computed tomography, transcranial Doppler velocities, arteriovenous difference in N2O method of CBF measurement, cerebral digital subtraction angiography, or any other objective means of CBF determination. RESULTS: We identified 38 animal studies with various animal models studied. Overall there was a trend to a direct vasodilatory effect of ketamine on the cerebral vasculature, with a trend in most studies to an increase or regional CBF (rCBF) or global CBF.Twenty human studies were identified. The majority displayed an increase in rCBF and global CBF on imaging in patients without neurological illness. CONCLUSIONS: Animal models indicate an increase in global CBF and rCBF with ketamine administration, with a trend to vasodilation of medium-sized intracranial vessels through a calcium-dependent mechanism. Human studies display an Oxford 2b, Grading of Recommendation Assessment Development and Education C, level of evidence to support a trend to increased global CBF and rCBF with ketamine administration in both healthy volunteers and elective surgical patients without neurological illness.  
  Address (up) *Section of Neurosurgery daggerDepartment of Medical Sciences double daggerSection of Critical Care and General Surgery, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB section signSection of Neurocritical Care, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2015/10/16  
  ISSN 1537-1921 (Electronic) 0898-4921 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes MEDLINE, BIOSIS, EMBASE, Global Health, SCOPUS, and Cochrane Library searched Approved no  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1382 Serial 2849  
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Author Voss-Rech, D.; Potter, L.; Vaz, C.S.; Pereira, D.I.; Sangioni, L.A.; Vargas, A.C.; de Avila Botton, S. doi  openurl
  Title Antimicrobial Resistance in Nontyphoidal Salmonella Isolated from Human and Poultry-Related Samples in Brazil: 20-Year Meta-Analysis Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Foodborne Pathogical Diseases Abbreviated Journal Foodborne Pathog Dis  
  Volume 14 Issue 2 Pages 116-124  
  Keywords Salmonella; Antimicrobial resistance; Humans; Poultry; Chickens; Zoonoses  
  Abstract Nontyphoidal Salmonella are one of the leading causes of foodborne diseases in the world. As poultry products are recognized as main sources of human salmonellosis, nontyphoidal Salmonella control has become a global issue for the poultry industry. The increasing antimicrobial resistance in poultry-related nontyphoidal Salmonella serovars is a global matter of concern. By monitoring the evolution of antimicrobial resistance, alternative treatments can be identified and possible restrictions in the treatment of systemic human salmonellosis foreseen. A meta-analysis was conducted to assess the profile and temporal evolution of the antimicrobial resistance of nontyphoidal Salmonella of poultry and human origin in Brazil, isolated in the period from 1995 to 2014. Four databases were researched; twenty-nine articles met the eligibility criteria and were included in the meta-analysis. In the nontyphoidal isolates of poultry origin, the highest levels of antimicrobial resistance were verified for sulfonamides (44.3%), nalidixic acid (42.5%), and tetracycline (35.5%). In the human-origin isolates, the resistance occurred mainly for sulfonamides (46.4%), tetracycline (36.9%), and ampicillin (23.6%). Twenty-two articles described results of antimicrobial resistance specifically for Salmonella Enteritidis, also enabling the individual meta-analysis of this serovar. For most antimicrobials, the resistance levels of Salmonella Enteritidis were lower than those found when considering all the nontyphoidal serovars. In the poultry-origin isolates, a quadratic temporal distribution was observed, with reduced resistance to streptomycin in Salmonella Enteritidis and in all nontyphoidal serovars, and a linear increase of resistance to nalidixic acid in Salmonella Enteritidis. In the human-origin isolates, a linear increase was identified in the resistance to nalidixic acid in Salmonella Enteritidis and in all the nontyphoidal isolates, and to gentamicin in Salmonella Enteritidis. Continuous monitoring of the development and spread of antimicrobial resistance could support the measurement of the consequences on poultry and human health.  
  Address (up) 1 Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Medicina Veterinaria (PPGMV), Departamento de Medicina Veterinaria Preventiva, Centro de Ciencias Rurais (CCR), Universidade Federal de Santa Maria (UFSM) , Santa Maria, Brazil . 2 Laboratorio de Sanidade e Genetica Animal , Embrapa Suinos e Aves, Concordia, Brazil . 3 Departamento de Zootecnia, CCR , UFSM, Santa Maria, Brazil . 4 Departamento de Microbiologia e Parasitologia, Instituto de Biologia (IB), Universidade Federal de Pelotas (UFPel) , Pelotas, Brazil .  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2016/12/07  
  ISSN 1556-7125 (Electronic) 1535-3141 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Databases searched not detailed in the abstract and full citation not available Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1449 Serial 2905  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Jaramillo, D.; Peeler, E.J.; Laurin, E.; Gardner, I.A.; Whittington, R.J. doi  openurl
  Title Serology in Finfish for Diagnosis, Surveillance, and Research: A Systematic Review Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Aquatic Animal Health Abbreviated Journal J Aquat Anim Health  
  Volume 29 Issue 1 Pages 1-14  
  Keywords Fish; Aquatic animals; Serological  
  Abstract Historically, serological tests for finfish diseases have been underused when compared with their use in terrestrial animal health. For years the nonspecific immune response in fish was judged to make serology unreliable and inferior to the direct measurement of agent analytes. We conducted a systematic review of peer-reviewed publications that reported on the development, validation, or application of serological tests for finfish diseases. A total of 168 articles met the screening criteria; most of them were focused on salmonid pathogens (e.g., Aeromonas spp. and viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus). Before the 1980s, most publications reported the use of agglutination tests, but our review indicates that enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) has more recently become the dominant serological test. The main application of serological tests has been in the assessment of vaccine efficacy, with few applications for surveillance or demonstration of freedom from disease, despite the advantages of serological tests over direct detection at the population level. Nonlethal sampling, low cost, and postinfection persistence of antibodies make serological assays the test of choice in surveillance, especially of valuable broodstock. However, their adoption has been constrained by poor characterization and validation. The number of publications in our review reporting diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of serological tests in finfish was small (n = 7). Foreseeing a wider use of serological tests in the future for diagnostic end purposes, we offer recommendations for mitigating deficiencies in the development and evaluation of serological tests, including optimization, control of nonspecific reactions, informed cutoff points, diagnostic accuracy, and serological baseline studies. Achieving these goals will facilitate greater international recognition of serological testing in programs supporting aquatic animal health. Received March 21, 2016; accepted September 24, 2016.  
  Address (up) a Atlantic Veterinary College , University of Prince Edward Island , 550 University Avenue, Charlottetown , Prince Edward Island C1A 4P3 , Canada. b Faculty of Veterinary Science , The University of Sydney , 425 Werombi Road, Camden , New South Wales 2570 , Australia. c Centre for Environment , Fisheries and Aquaculture Science , Barrack Road, Weymouth DT4 8UB , UK.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2017/02/07  
  ISSN 1548-8667 (Electronic) 0899-7659 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Databases not stated in abstract, full citation not yet available. Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1452 Serial 2908  
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Author LaVallee, E.; Mueller, M.K.; McCobb, E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A Systematic Review of the Literature Addressing Veterinary Care for Underserved Communities Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Jounrl of Applied Animal Welfare Science Abbreviated Journal Journal of Applied Animal Welfare Science  
  Volume Epublication ahead of print Issue Pages 1-14  
  Keywords Charity medine; Low price clinic; Community medicine; Low-price clinic; Underserved community  
  Abstract Currently, there is a care gap in veterinary medicine affecting low-income and underserved communities, resulting in decreased nonhuman-animal health and welfare. The use of low-price and community veterinary clinics in underserved populations is a strategy to improve companion-animal health through preventative care, spay/neuter, and other low-price care programs and services. Little research has documented the structure and effectiveness of such initiatives. This systematic review aimed to assess current published research pertaining to accessible health care, community-based veterinary medicine, and the use of community medicine in teaching programs. The review was an in-depth literature search identifying 51 publications relevant to the importance, benefits, drawbacks, and use of low-price and community clinics in underserved communities. These articles identified commonly discussed barriers to care that may prevent underserved clientele from seeking veterinary care. Five barriers were identified including the cost of veterinary care, accessibility of care, problems with or lack of veterinarian-client communication, culture/language, and lack of client education. The review also identified a need for additional research regarding evidence of effectiveness and efficiency in community medicine initiatives.  
  Address (up) a Center for Animals and Public Policy , Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2017/06/29  
  ISSN 1532-7604 (Electronic) 1088-8705 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Databases not stated in abstract, contacting authors for details as full citation not available Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1430 Serial 2895  
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Author Denagamage, T.; Jayarao, B.; Patterson, P.; Wallner-Pendleton, E.; Kariyawasam, S. doi  openurl
  Title Risk Factors Associated With Salmonella in Laying Hen Farms: Systematic Review of Observational Studies Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Avian Diseases Abbreviated Journal Avian Dis  
  Volume 59 Issue 2 Pages 291-302  
  Keywords Poultry; Chickens; Salmonella  
  Abstract Salmonella contamination of laying hen flocks and shell eggs is associated with various management and environmental factors. Foodborne outbreaks of human salmonellosis have been traced back to consumption of Salmonella-contaminated shell eggs. In the present study, a systematic literature review was conducted to identify and provide an evidence-based overview of potential risk factors of Salmonella contamination of laying hens, layer premises, and shell eggs. This systematic literature search was conducted using AGRICOLA, CAB Abstracts, and PubMed databases. Observational studies that identified risk factors for Salmonella contamination of layer flocks and shell eggs were selected, and best evidence was synthesized to summarize the results. Altogether, 13 cross-sectional studies and four longitudinal studies published in English were included in the review. Evidence scores were assigned based on the study design and quality of the study to grade the evidence level. The strength of association of a risk factor was determined according to the odds ratios. In this systematic review, the presence of previous Salmonella infection, absence of cleaning and disinfection, presence of rodents, induced molting, larger flock size (>30,000 hens), multiage management, cage housing systems, in-line egg processing, rearing pullets on the floor, pests with access to feed prior to movement to the feed trough, visitors allowed in the layer houses, and trucks near farms and air inlets were identified as the risk factors associated with Salmonella contamination of laying hen premises, whereas high level of manure contamination, middle and late phase of production, high degree of egg-handling equipment contamination, flock size of >30,000, and egg production rate of >96% were identified as the risk factors associated with Salmonella contamination of shell eggs. These risk factors demonstrated strong to moderate evidence of association with Salmonella contamination of laying hens and shell eggs. Eggshells testing positive for Salmonella were 59 times higher when fecal samples were positive and nine times higher when floor dust samples were positive. Risk factors associated with Salmonella Enteritidis infection in laying hens were flock size, housing system, and farms with hens of different ages. As a summary, this systematic review demonstrated that Salmonella contamination of laying hen flocks and shell eggs in layer production systems is multifactorial. This study provides a knowledge base for the implementation of targeted intervention strategies to control Salmonella contamination of laying hen flocks and shell eggs.  
  Address (up) A Department of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802. B Department of Animal Science, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2015/10/17  
  ISSN 0005-2086 (Print) 0005-2086 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes AGRICOLA, CAB Abstracts, and PubMed searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1381 Serial 2848  
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Author McCrackin, M.A.; Helke, K.L.; Galloway, A.M.; Poole, A.Z.; Salgado, C.D.; Marriott, B.P. doi  openurl
  Title Effect of Antimicrobial Use in Agricultural Animals on Drug-resistant Foodborne Campylobacteriosis in Humans: A Systematic Literature Review Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition Abbreviated Journal Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr  
  Volume Epublication ahead of print Issue Pages  
  Keywords Cattle; Sheep; Pigs; Food safety; Antibiotics; Meat  
  Abstract Controversy continues concerning antimicrobial use in food animals and its relationship to drug-resistant infections in humans. We systematically reviewed published literature for evidence of a relationship between antimicrobial use in agricultural animals and drug-resistant foodborne campylobacteriosis in humans. Based on publications from the United States (U.S.), Canada and Denmark from 2010 to July 2014, 195 articles were retained for abstract review, 50 met study criteria for full article review with 36 retained for which data are presented. Two publications reported increase in macrolide resistance of Campylobacter coli isolated from feces of swine receiving macrolides in feed, and one of these described similar findings for tetracyclines and fluoroquinolones. A study in growing turkeys demonstrated increased macrolide resistance associated with therapeutic dosing with Tylan(R) in drinking water. One publication linked tetracycline-resistant C. jejuni clone SA in raw cow's milk to a foodborne outbreak in humans. No studies that identified farm antimicrobial use also traced antimicrobial-resistant Campylobacter from farm to fork. Recent literature confirms that on farm antibiotic selection pressure can increase colonization of animals with drug-resistant Campylobacter spp. but is inadequately detailed to establish a causal relationship between use of antimicrobials in agricultural animals and prevalence of drug-resistant foodborne campylobacteriosis in humans.  
  Address (up) a Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center Research Service , Charleston , SC , USA 29401. b Department of Comparative Medicine , Professor, College of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina , Charleston , SC , USA 29425. c Nutrition Section, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine, and Military Division, Department of Psychiatry , College of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina , Charleston , SC , USA 29425. d Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine , College of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina , Charleston , SC , USA 29425.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2015/11/19  
  ISSN 1549-7852 (Electronic) 1040-8398 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes SCOPUS searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1370 Serial 2839  
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Author van Knegsel, A.T.; van der Drift, S.G.; Cermakova, J.; Kemp, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of shortening the dry period of dairy cows on milk production, energy balance, health, and fertility: A systematic review Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Veterinary Journal (London, England : 1997) Abbreviated Journal Vet J  
  Volume 198 Issue 3 Pages 707-13  
  Keywords Cattle; Animals; Cattle/physiology; Cattle Diseases/prevention & control; Dairying/methods; Energy Metabolism; Female; Fertility; Lactation; Milk/secretion; Milk Proteins/metabolism; Milk Proteins  
  Abstract A dry period of 6-8weeks for dairy cows is generally thought to maximise milk production in the next lactation. However, the value of such a long dry period is increasingly questioned. In particular, shortening the dry period shifts milk production from the critical period after calving to the weeks before calving. This shift in milk production could improve the energy balance (EB), health and fertility of dairy cows. The objective of this study was to systematically review the current knowledge on dry period length in relation to milk production, EB, fertility, and health of cows and calves. A meta-analysis was performed for variables where at least five studies were available. Overall, both shortening and omitting the dry period reduces milk production, increases milk protein percentage and tends to reduce the risk of ketosis in the next lactation. Individual studies reported an improvement of EB after a short or no dry period, compared with a conventional dry period. Shortening or omitting the dry period did not affect milk fat percentage and shortening the dry period did not alter the odds ratio for mastitis, metritis, or fertility measures in the next lactation. So, current evidence for an improvement of health and fertility of dairy cows is marginal and may be partly explained by the limited number of studies which have evaluated health and fertility in relation to dry period length, the limited number of animals in those studies and the variable responses reported.  
  Address (up) Adaptation Physiology Group, Department of Animal Sciences, Wageningen University, P.O. Box 338, 6700 AH Wageningen, The Netherlands. Electronic address: Ariette.vanKnegsel@wur.nl.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2013/11/19  
  ISSN 1532-2971 (Electronic) 1090-0233 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, Google Scholar and Scopus searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1177 Serial 2673  
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Author Mikkelsen, H.; Aagaard, C.; Nielsen, S.S.; Jungersen, G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Review of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis antigen candidates with diagnostic potential Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Veterinary Microbiology Abbreviated Journal Vet Microbiol  
  Volume 152 Issue 1-2 Pages 1-20  
  Keywords Animals; Antigens, Bacterial/diagnostic use/immunology; Cattle/immunology/microbiology; Cattle Diseases/diagnosis/immunology/microbiology; Cell Wall/immunology; Feces/microbiology; Heat-Shock Proteins/immunology; Immunity, Cellular; Lipoproteins/immunology; Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis/immunology; Paratuberculosis/diagnosis/immunology/microbiology; Sensitivity and Specificity; Cattle  
  Abstract Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is a slow growing bacterium that can infect ruminants and remain latent for years without development of any clinical signs or disease. Diagnosis is often based on detection of MAP antibodies in milk or serum samples or culture of bacteria from faeces; however, these diagnostic tools are often not applicable until years after infection. Detection of MAP specific cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses can serve as an alternative and be implemented in a diagnostic tool. CMI responses can be measured at an early stage of infection, prior to development of antibodies and shedding of detectable amounts of MAP. At present, available diagnostic assays are limited by the lack of MAP specific antigens included in these assays resulting in poor specificity. The objective of this review is to provide a systematic overview of diagnostic MAP antigen candidates described to date with special emphasis on antigen candidates tested for CMI responses. Relevant information on 115 different MAP antigens was systematically extracted from literature and summarized in 6 tables of CMI antigens, secreted antigens, cell wall and membrane antigens, lipoprotein antigens, heat shock antigens and hypothetical antigens. Strategies for evaluation of novel antigen candidates are discussed critically. Relatively few of the described antigens were evaluated for their use in CMI based diagnostic assays and so far, no obvious candidate has been identified for this application. Most of the novel diagnostic candidates were evaluated in few animals and it is recommended that an appropriate sample size is included for evaluation of antigen candidates in future studies.  
  Address (up) Adaptive Immunology and Parasitology, National Veterinary Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Bulowsvej 27, 1790 Copenhagen, Denmark.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2011/04/13  
  ISSN 1873-2542 (Electronic) 0378-1135 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Web of Science and PubMed searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 849 Serial 2509  
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Author McKenzie, B.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title What is the evidence? There is only very weak clinical trial evidence to support the use of glucosamine and chondroitin supplements for osteoarthritis in dogs Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association Abbreviated Journal J Am Vet Med Assoc  
  Volume 237 Issue 12 Pages 1382-1383  
  Keywords Animals; Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/adverse effects/therapeutic use; Chondroitin/therapeutic use; Dog Diseases/diagnosis/drug therapy; Dogs; Evidence-Based Medicine; Glucosamine/therapeutic use; Male; Osteoarthritis, Hip/diagnosis/drug therapy/veterinary  
  Abstract  
  Address (up) Adobe Animal Hospital, 4470 El Camino Real, Los Altos, CA 94022, USA. mckenzievmd@gmail.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2010/12/16  
  ISSN 0003-1488 (Print) 0003-1488 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 467 Serial 2501  
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