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Author Caja, G.; Roca, X.; Salama, A.K.K. url  isbn
openurl 
  Title [A meta-analysis for comparing dry matter intake prediction models in dairy goats] Type Book Chapter
  Year 2011 Publication XIV Jornadas sobre Produccion Animal, Zaragoza, Espana, 17 y 18 de mayo de 2011 Abbreviated Journal (up)  
  Volume Issue Pages 216-218  
  Keywords Dairy Animals [LL110]; Animal Nutrition (Production Responses) [LL520]; Mathematics and Statistics [ZZ100]; body weight; dairy performance; dry matter; feed intake; meta-analysis; milk fat; milk yield; milk yielding animals; models; performance traits; goats; [Indexed using CAB Thesaurus terms]  
  Abstract Currently available models for dairy goats (INRA, 2007; NRC, 2007; Avondo et al., 2008) estimated dry matter intake (DMI) from body weight (BW) and milk yield (MY). A model comparison for similar BW showed marked differences in predicted DMI depending on MY (0 to 6 L/d). A meta-analysis of dairy goat intake data published in 125 papers indexed in PubMed and Science Direct was done, resulting in a total of 219 values normally distributed. Milk yield was standardized to 3.5% milk fat (MY3.5%). Goat performances ranged from 29.0 to 85.5 kg BW, 0.4 to 6.2 L/d MY3.5% and 0.8 to 3.5 kg DMI/d. Prediction models were (+or-SEM; P<0.001): DMI (+or-0.099)=1.233+0.370 x MY3.5%; R2=0.69 DMI (+or-0.075)=0.553+0.277 x MY3.5%+0.018 x BW; R2=0.76 The meta-analysis models showed the lowest error of prediction (-0.030 kg DM/d), being lower than those of the Avondo et al. (-0.092 kg DM/d) and INRA (-0.101 kg DM/d) models. On the contrary, the NRC overestimated intake (+0.185 kg DM/d).  
  Address Grup de Recerca en Remugants (G2R), Departament de Ciencia Animal i dels Aliments, Facultat de Veterinaria, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona), Spain. gerardo.caja@uab.es  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Asociacion Interprofesional para el Desarrollo Agrario Place of Publication Zaragoza Editor  
  Language Spanish Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title XIV Jornadas sobre Produccion Animal, Zaragoza, Espana, 17 y 18 de mayo de 2011  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN 978-84-615-0062-8 Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed and Science Direct searched. Database record copyright CAB International 2010 Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 296 Serial 2370  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Downs, S.H.; Parry, J.; Nunez-Garcia, J.; Abernethy, D.A.; Broughan, J.M.; Cameron, A.R.; Cook, A.J.; Rua-Domenech, R. de la; Goodchild, A.V.; Greiner, M.; Gunn, J.; More, S.J.; Rhodes, S.; Rolfe, S.; Sharp, M.; Upton, P.; Vordermeier, H.M.; Watson, E.; Welsh, M.; Whelan, A.O.; Woolliams, J.A.; Clifton-Hadley, R.S. isbn  openurl
  Title Meta-analysis of diagnostic test performance and modelling of testing strategies for control of bovine tuberculosis in GB Type Book Chapter
  Year 2011 Publication Proceedings of the Society for Veterinary Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Leipzig, Germany, 23 Abbreviated Journal (up)  
  Volume Issue Pages 139-153  
  Keywords Dairy Animals [LL110]; Prion, Viral, Bacterial and Fungal Pathogens of Animals [LL821]; Diagnosis of Animal Diseases [LL886]; Mathematics and Statistics [ZZ100]; control programmes; cows; dairy cattle; dairy cows; dairy herds; diagnosis; diagnostic techniques; disease control; disease prevalence; disease prevention; disease transmission; epidemiology; estimates; mathematical models; meta-analysis; monitoring; probability; risk; statistical analysis; tuberculosis; cattle; Mycobacterium bovis; UK; Bos; Bovidae; ruminants; Artiodactyla; mammals; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; ungulates; eukaryotes; Mycobacterium; Mycobacteriaceae; Corynebacterineae; Actinomycetales; Actinobacteridae; Actinobacteria; Bacteria; prokaryotes; British Isles; Western Europe; Europe; Commonwealth of Nations; Developed Countries; European Union Countries; OECD Countries; cattle; [Indexed using CAB Thesaurus terms]  
  Abstract The British Government spends over <pounds>100 million per annum on the control of bovine tuberculosis (bTB). Improvement in the control through targeted use of diagnostic tests is one focus of eradication plans. The aims were: (a) through systematic literature review identify primary research with estimates of sensitivity (Se) and specificity (Sp) for diagnostic tests for bTB in cattle (b) conduct a statistical meta-analysis to estimate test performance, and (c) using the estimates, model and compare different testing strategies. Of 9782 references reviewed, only 261 met agreed criteria and contained performance estimates for one or more of 14 diagnostic tests. The performance of bTB surveillance systems using the estimates of test performance was affected by the historical probability of herd freedom and the risk of introduction of infection. Where the probability of introduction of infection was high, it was difficult to achieve a high target probability of herd freedom from infection.  
  Address Veterinary Laboratories Agency-Weybridge, New Haw, Addlestone, Surrey, KT15 3NB, UK. s.downs@vla.defra.gsi.gov.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Society for Veterinary Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine Place of Publication Roslin Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title Proceedings of the Society for Veterinary Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Leipzig, Germany, 23  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN 978-0-948073-99-1 Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Web of Science, Current Contents, CAB Abstracts, MEDLINE, Embase, AGRICOLA and AGRIS searched. Database record copyright CAB International 2010 Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 310 Serial 2398  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Waghorn, G.C.; Northover, S.A. isbn  openurl
  Title Milk production response to iodine supplementation – will it work in New Zealand cows: results of a literature search Type Book Chapter
  Year 1992 Publication Trace elements: roles, risks and remedies. Proceedings of the New Zealand Trace Elements Group Conference Abbreviated Journal (up)  
  Volume Issue Pages 116-122  
  Keywords Animal Nutrition (Physiology) [LL510]; Dairy Animals [LL110]; cows; feeding; goitre; iodine; milk production; milk yield; nutritional state; supplements; cattle; New Zealand; Bos; Bovidae; ruminants; Artiodactyla; mammals; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; ungulates; eukaryotes; Australasia; Oceania; Developed Countries; Commonwealth of Nations; OECD Countries; [Indexed using CAB Thesaurus terms]  
  Abstract As endemic goitre was widespread in New Zealand before the introduction of iodized salt, it was assumed that ruminants, particularly dairy cows, may benefit from iodine supplementation although clinical signs of I deficiency are rare. Several trials with sheep have not indicated any significant response in productivity to I supplements, but no definitive trials have been made with dairy cows. Estimates of pasture I concentrations are variable and requirements for lactating cows are imprecise. To ascertain the possibility of a response to I supplements, 2 literature searches, with CAB ABSTRACTS and DIALOG, were made and the procedures involved in each search are described. There were only 3 data sets in which the effect of I supplementation was studied in cows with an inadequate I intake. There was no response in terms of milk production or composition. It is suggested that, in the absence of goitrogens, pasture I less than 500 mu g/kg DM may be adequate for lactating cows but there are insufficient data on pasture or milk I in New Zealand to make an informed judgment on I status in dairy cows.  
  Address AgResearch, Private Bag 11008, Palmerston North, New Zealand.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Massey University Place of Publication Palmerston North Editor Lee, J.; Turner, M.A.; Joblin, K.N.; Grace, N.D.; Savage, G.P.  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title Trace elements: roles, risks and remedies. Proceedings of the New Zealand Trace Elements Group Confe  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN 0-473-01893-4 Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes CAB Abstracts and DIALOG searched (Note: DIALOG is a search interface, not a defined database). Database record copyright CAB International 2010 Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 417 Serial 2637  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author International Livestock Research Institute url  openurl
  Title Mapping of poverty and likely zoonoses hotspots Type Report
  Year 2012 Publication Mapping of poverty and likely zoonoses hotspots, Zoonoses Project 4, Report to Department for International Development, UK Abbreviated Journal (up)  
  Volume Issue Pages 119 pp  
  Keywords Agricultural Economics [EE110] Veterinary Economics [EE117] Health Economics [EE118] Income and Poverty [EE950] Prion, Viral, Bacterial and Fungal Pathogens of Animals [LL821] Protozoan, Helminth, Mollusc and Arthropod Parasites of Animals [LL822] Meteorology and Climate [PP500] Prion, Viral, Bacterial and Fungal Pathogens of Humans [VV210] Protozoan, Helminth and Arthropod Parasites of Humans [VV220] Occupational Health and Safety [VV900] agroecological zones animal diseases animal production climate change disease transmission emerging infectious diseases farmers human diseases infectious diseases livestock mapping occupational hazards poverty productivity zoonoses man Developing Countries countries Homo Hominidae Primates mammals vertebrates Chordata animals eukaryotes; [Indexed using CAB Thesaurus terms]  
  Abstract This report aims to present data and expert knowledge on poverty and zoonoses hotspots to inform prioritization of study areas on the transmission of disease in emerging livestock systems in the developing world, where prevention of zoonotic disease might bring greatest benefit to poor people. The first chapter reviews the substantial literature on prioritizing disease and identifies prioritization criteria relevant to this study, namely: burden of human disease; impacts on livestock production and productivity; amenability to agricultural intervention; and, concern because of emergence or severity. This allowed the identification of 24 zoonoses of high importance to poor people, 13 of which were investigated in depth. The next chapter reviews current evidence on poverty and livestock, on livestock systems and their dynamics, and on zoonoses and how they are currently mapped. The map of poor livestock keepers is updated and an additional map based on subnational data is presented. Maps of livestock systems that are changing most rapidly in response to emerging markets are also presented, and vulnerability to climate change is described. The strengths and weaknesses of different maps are noted. The next chapter presents evidence from a systematic review of over 1000 studies on the prevalence of the 13 priority zoonoses in people and animals. It focuses on the endemic zoonoses that impose greatest burden and a 'top 20' list is given of geographical hotspots. Data on zoonoses are also extracted from the WHO Global Burden of Disease and the 'top 20' countries identified. A case study that compares our systematic review with an 'in-country review' focusing on grey literature and literature in a language other than English is included. Some of the challenges of the study and caution in interpreting the results are discussed. The next chapter updates the map of emerging disease events. For the first time, emerging zoonoses are mapped as distinct from other emerging disease events. The last chapter provides maps of regional agroecosystems and summarizes numbers of livestock, people and poor livestock keepers by system as well as the zoonoses context. It also draws some global conclusions from the study.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher ILRI Place of Publication Nairobi Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, CAB Direct (CAB Abstracts?), Google and Google Scholar searched. Database record copyright CAB International 2010. Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1166 Serial 2662  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Newman, J. url  openurl
  Title Human-directed dog aggression: A systematic review Type Book Whole
  Year 2012 Publication Thesis Abbreviated Journal (up)  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords dogs; aggression; bite; behaviour; epidemiology; risk factor  
  Abstract Human-directed dog aggression is a worldwide issue with major public health and animal welfare implications. Consequences for the target of aggression range from fear and minor injury, to life threatening injury and death, and for the dog impaired freedoms, restricted interactions and ultimately euthanasia. The systematic review undertaken here aimed to identify and assimilate all robust evidence regarding factors that affect the risk of human-directed dog aggression. Such information is vital for the development of sound preventive strategies. Multiple electronic literature databases were interrogated in order to identify all evidence for risk factors of human-directed dog aggression. The search strategy was designed to minimise the risk of publication and language biases, specificity was sacrificed for sensitivity. The threshold for acceptance of evidence was predetermined at a moderate level; any study that provided evidence with a low risk of confounding and bias and a moderate probability that any relationship identified was causal would reach the final review. Appraisal examined methodological quality, study design, selection process, measurement of outcome and exposures, and type and quality of analysis. All stages of appraisal were undertaken blind to the study findings. On assimilating the evidence identified, no robust evidence for any risk factors of human-directed dog aggression was identified. Eight studies provided a moderate level of somewhat conflicting evidence. Amongst those studies appraised as failing to reach the moderate level of acceptable evidence, the majority were excluded as a result of multiple limitations. It is vital that future research is undertaken to a high methodological standard in order that it provides robust evidence for the effect of any risk factor identified.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis Master's thesis  
  Publisher University of Liverpool Place of Publication Liverpool Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Master of Philosophy Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Department of Veterinary Clinical Science Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1265 Serial 2753  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Mitsunaga Junior, J.K.; Gragnani, A.; Ramos, M.L.; Ferreira, L.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Rat an experimental model for burns: a systematic review Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Acta cirurgica brasileira / Sociedade Brasileira para Desenvolvimento Pesquisa em Cirurgia Abbreviated Journal (up) Acta Cir Bras  
  Volume 27 Issue 6 Pages 417-423  
  Keywords Animals; Burns/pathology/physiopathology/therapy; Disease Models, Animal; Postoperative Period; Rats; Research Design; Skin/pathology  
  Abstract PURPOSE: To revise and systematize scientific knowledge of the experimental model for cutaneous burns in rats. METHODS: A bibliographical review from 2008 up to January 2011 in PubMed, EMBASE and LILACS was undertaken. Were used the keywords: animal models, burns and rats. 221 studies were identified, and 116 were selected. RESULTS: It was found that: 54/86 (62.7%) had third degree burns; 55/73 (75.3%) studied the back; 45/78 (57.6%) used heated water and 27/78 (35.9%) incandescent instruments; 39/78 (50%) studied systemic effects; 22/71 (31%) used ketamine associated with xylazine; 61/64 (95.3%) performed depilation with appropriate equipment; 36/72 (50%) used microscopy; more than 50% did not describe analgesia or antibiotics during the postoperative period; in 42/116 (36.2%) postoperative fluid therapy was performed; and the time interval after the burn, up to the beginning of the results analysis varied from 7s up to four weeks. Legislation issues on burn experiments are discussed. CONCLUSION: The hot water was the main method to induce burns those of third degree on the back, with anesthesia using ketamine and xylazine, after depilation. These were evaluated microscopically, without using analgesia or an antibiotic during the postoperative period. The studies were not very reproducible.  
  Address UNIFESP-EPM, Sao Paulo-SP, Brazil.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2012/06/06  
  ISSN 1678-2674 (Electronic) 0102-8650 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, EMBASE and LILACS searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1124 Serial 2514  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Brioudes, A.; Warner, J.; Hedlefs, R.; Gummow, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A review of domestic animal diseases within the Pacific Islands region Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Acta Tropica Abbreviated Journal (up) Acta Trop  
  Volume 132 Issue Pages 23-38  
  Keywords Cats; Cattle; Dogs; Donkeys; Goats; Horses; Pigs; Swine; Poultry; Sheep  
  Abstract The Pacific Island countries and territories (PICTs) are reported to be free of the most serious infectious livestock diseases which are prevalent in other parts of the globe, such as Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza, Foot and Mouth Disease or Rabies. Yet there is a lack of scientifically based evidence to confirm this animal health status. This paper reviews what has been published on diseases of domestic animals in the Pacific Islands region with a particular focus on data from the last 20 years (1992-2012). Relevant published papers were identified by a computerized literature search of two electronic databases (PubMed and Web of Knowledge). The latest reports on the animal health situation submitted by the PICTs to the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) were accessed on the World Animal Health Information Database (WAHID) interface and included in this review. Additionally, paper searches of resources were undertaken at the library of the Secretariat of the Pacific Community (SPC) in Fiji to retrieve any relevant grey literature for this review. The study eligibility criteria included qualitative or quantitative information on any disease (bacterial, viral, parasitic and other health disorders) affecting domestic terrestrial animals (mammals, reptiles, birds and bees) in any of the 22 PICTs members of the SPC. A total of 158 eligible references were retrieved of which only 77 (48.7%) were published since 1992 and analysed in more details. One hundred and one diseases and pathogens were reported on for bee, bird, carabao, cat, cattle, crocodile, deer, dog, donkey, goat, horse, pig, pigeon, poultry and sheep in the Oceania region and in 17 PICTs in particular. The paper gives information about known animal diseases, their reported prevalence and diseases not reported within the Pacific Islands region. The study found retrieved literature on animal diseases in PICTs was scarce and no longer up to date. There is a need to improve the published knowledge on the current animal disease status in the region.  
  Address School of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Health and Molecular Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville 4811, QLD, Australia. Electronic address: Aurelie.Brioudes@my.jcu.edu.au. Department of Production Animal Studies, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2014/01/07  
  ISSN 1873-6254 (Electronic) 0001-706X (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed and Web of Knowledge (Web of Science?) searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1231 Serial 2720  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Asmare, K.; Sheferaw, D.; Aragaw, K.; Abera, M.; Sibhat, B.; Haile, A.; Kiara, H.; Szonyi, B.; Skjerve, E.; Wieland, B. doi  openurl
  Title Gastrointestinal nematode infection in small ruminants in Ethiopia: A systematic review and meta-analysis Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Acta Tropica Abbreviated Journal (up) Acta Trop  
  Volume 160 Issue Pages 68-77  
  Keywords Sheep; Ovine; Goat; Caprine; Haemonchus; Nematoda; Nematode Infections; Prevalence; Meta analysis  
  Abstract Gastrointestinal (GI) nematode infections are a major health challenge affecting productive and reproductive performance of sheep and goats in Ethiopia. However, there is no comprehensive summary on the occurrence and distribution of the infection at national level. This systematic review provides pooled prevalence estimates and assesses potential predictors of the nematode infections in small ruminants, i.e. helpful in planning interventions or control strategies. The review used 50 animal level datasets retrieved from 24 manuscripts. The studies used data collected from 9407 sheep and 3478 goats. A meta-analytical approach was employed to analyze Effect size (ES). The reported GI nematodes represented eleven genera affecting sheep and goats including: Haemonchus, Trichostrongylus, Teladorsagia/Ostertagia, Strongyloides, Bunostomum, Nematodirus, Chabertia, Trichuris, Cooperia, Skrjabinema and Oesophagostomum. The GI nematodes pooled prevalence estimate in the random effect model was 75.8% (95% CI: 69.6, 80.8). The subgroup analysis revealed significant (p<0.05) differences in the prevalence between different regions and type of diagnostic methods used. 'Postmortem technique' and 'eastern part of the country' were associated with higher GI nematode prevalence and accounted for 68.1% of the between studies heterogeneity. In light of the high parasitic prevalence in all agro-ecologies, the need for strategic intervention is recommended. Meanwhile, data need to be generated for some of the regions where dependable survey reports are lacking.  
  Address School of Veterinary Medicine, Hawassa University, P.O. Box 005, Hawassa, Ethiopia. Electronic address: ka7588@yahoo.com. School of Veterinary Medicine, Hawassa University, P.O. Box 005, Hawassa, Ethiopia. College of Veterinary Medicine, Haramaya University, P.O. Box 138, Dire Dawa, Ethiopia. International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA), Ethiopia Research Platform, Sub-Saharan Africa Regional Program, P.O. Box 5689, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), P.O. Box 30709, Nairobi, Kenya. International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), P.O. Box 5689, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Norwegian University of Life Sciences, P.O. Box 8146 Dep., N- 0033 Oslo, Norway.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2016/05/08  
  ISSN 1873-6254 (Electronic) 0001-706X (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, Web of Science, Google scholar, Cab Direct and African Journals Online searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1424 Serial 2883  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Asmare, K.; Abayneh, T.; Sibhat, B.; Shiferaw, D.; Szonyi, B.; Krontveit, R.I.; Skjerve, E.; Wieland, B. doi  openurl
  Title Major vectors and vector-borne diseases in small ruminants in Ethiopia: A systematic review Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Acta Tropica Abbreviated Journal (up) Acta Trop  
  Volume 170 Issue Pages 95-104  
  Keywords Epidemiology; Babesiosis; Ethiopia; Insect Vectors; Ruminants; Theileriasis; Ticks; Trypanosomiasis; Goats; Sheep; Vector  
  Abstract Vector-borne diseases are among major health constraints of small ruminant in Ethiopia. While various studies on single vector-borne diseases or presence of vectors have been conducted, no summarized evidence is available on the occurrence of these diseases and the related vectors. This systematic literature review provides a comprehensive summary on major vectors and vector-borne diseases in small ruminants in Ethiopia. Search for published and unpublished literature was conducted between 8th of January and 25th of June 2015. The search was both manual and electronic. The databases used in electronic search were PubMed, Web of Science, CAB Direct and AJOL. For most of the vector-borne diseases, the summary was limited to narrative synthesis due to lack of sufficient data. Meta-analysis was computed for trypanosomosis and dermatophilosis while meta-regression and sensitivity analysis was done only for trypanososmosis due to lack of sufficient reports on dermatophilosis. Owing emphasis to their vector role, ticks and flies were summarized narratively at genera/species level. In line with inclusion criteria, out of 106 initially identified research reports 43 peer-reviewed articles passed the quality assessment. Data on 7 vector-borne diseases were extracted at species and region level from each source. Accordingly, the pooled prevalence estimate of trypanosomosis was 3.7% with 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.8, 4.9), while that of dermatophilosis was 3.1% (95% CI: 1.6, 6.0). The in-between study variance noted for trypanosomosis was statistically significant (p<0.05). Among the three covariates considered for meta-regression, only one (species) fitted the final model significantly (p<0.05) and explained 65.44% of the between studies variance (R2). The prevalence in sheep (5.5%) increased nearly by 34% compared to goats (2.9%). The parasitic presence in blood was documented for babesiosis (3.7% in goats); and anaplasmosis (3.9% in sheep). Serological evidence was retrieved for bluetongue ranging from 34.1% to 46.67% in sheep, and coxiellosis was 10.4% in goats. There was also molecular evidence on the presence of theileriosis in sheep (93%, n=160) and goats (1.9%, n=265). Regarding vectors of veterinary importance, 14 species of ticks in five genera, four species of Glossina and 4 genera of biting flies were reported. Despite the evidence on presence of various vectors including ticks, flies, mosquitoes and midges, studies on vector-borne diseases in Ethiopia are surprisingly rare, especially considering risks related to climate change, which is likely to affect distribution of vectors. Thus better evidence on the current situation is urgently needed in order to prevent spread and to model future distribution scenarios.  
  Address School of Veterinary Medicine, Hawassa University, P.O. Box 005, Hawassa, Ethiopia. Electronic address: kassahun7588@gmail.com. College of Veterinary Medicine and Agriculture, Addis Ababa University, P.O. Box 34, Debre-Zeit, Ethiopia. College of Veterinary Medicine, Haramaya University, P.O. Box 138, Dire Dawa, Ethiopia. School of Veterinary Medicine, Hawassa University, P.O. Box 005, Hawassa, Ethiopia. International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), P.O. Box 5689, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Norwegian Medicines Agency, P. O. Box 6167 Etterstad, N-0602, Oslo, Norway. University of Life Sciences, Department of Food Safety and Infection Biology, Oslo, Norway.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2017/02/19  
  ISSN 1873-6254 (Electronic) 0001-706X (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, Web of Science, CAB Direct and AJOL searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1460 Serial 2916  
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Author Meganck, V.; Hoflack, G.; Opsomer, G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Advances in prevention and therapy of neonatal dairy calf diarrhoea: a systematical review with emphasis on colostrum management and fluid therapy Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Acta Veterinaria Scandinavica Abbreviated Journal (up) Acta Vet Scand  
  Volume 56 Issue Pages 75  
  Keywords Cattle; Cows; Calves; Diarrhoea  
  Abstract Neonatal calf diarrhoea remains the most common cause of morbidity and mortality in preweaned dairy calves worldwide. This complex disease can be triggered by both infectious and non-infectious causes. The four most important enteropathogens leading to neonatal dairy calf diarrhoea are Escherichia coli, rota- and coronavirus, and Cryptosporidium parvum. Besides treating diarrhoeic neonatal dairy calves, the veterinarian is the most obvious person to advise the dairy farmer on prevention and treatment of this disease. This review deals with prevention and treatment of neonatal dairy calf diarrhoea focusing on the importance of a good colostrum management and a correct fluid therapy.  
  Address Department of Reproduction, Obstetrics and Herd Health, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ghent University, Salisburylaan 133, Merelbeke, 9820, Belgium. vanessa.meganck@ugent.be.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2014/11/29  
  ISSN 1751-0147 (Electronic) 0044-605X (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Web of Science searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1312 Serial 2793  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Christensen, M.B.; Eriksen, T.; Kjelgaard-Hansen, M. doi  openurl
  Title C-reactive protein: quantitative marker of surgical trauma and post-surgical complications in dogs: a systematic review Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Acta Veterinaria Scandinavica Abbreviated Journal (up) Acta Vet Scand  
  Volume 57 Issue Pages 71  
  Keywords Dogs; Canine; C-reactive protein  
  Abstract C-reactive protein (CRP) is a major acute phase protein showing increasing serum concentrations in dogs with systemic inflammation following e.g., surgery, trauma, infections, or neoplasia. CRP is a useful diagnostic marker of systemic inflammation in dogs and automated assays have been validated for reliable measurements for routine diagnostic purposes. In the present study available evidence for the use of CRP as a marker of surgery related systemic inflammation in dogs was reviewed and assessed. Two main themes were in focus: (1) canine CRP as a potential marker of postsurgical infectious complications and (2) canine CRP as a marker of the degree of surgical trauma. As outlined in the review several studies suggest that CRP is a useful marker for both purposes. However, the evidence level is limited and studies in the field are all affected by considerable risks of bias. Thus, further studies are needed in order to confirm the assumptions from previous studies and increase the level of evidence for CRP as a useful marker for detecting inflammation after surgery in dogs.  
  Address Department of Veterinary Clinical and Animal Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Dyrlaegevej 16, 1870, Frederiksberg C, Denmark. mic@sund.ku.dk. Department of Veterinary Clinical and Animal Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Dyrlaegevej 16, 1870, Frederiksberg C, Denmark. ter@sund.ku.dk. Novo Nordisk A/S, Novo Nordisk Park, 2760, Maaloev, Denmark. mdkh@novonordisk.com.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2015/10/21  
  ISSN 1751-0147 (Electronic) 0044-605X (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, Web of Science, Agris, and CAB Abstract searched Approved no  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1380 Serial 2847  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Li, F.; Xu, M.; Cao, Y.C.; Sun, F.F.; Yang, X.J.; Yao, J.H.; Li, D.Q. url  openurl
  Title [Meta-analysis to optimizing dietary carbohydrate balance index in lactating dairy cow] Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Acta Veterinaria et Zootechnica Sinica Abbreviated Journal (up) Acta Veterinaria et Zootechnica Sinica  
  Volume 45 Issue 9 Pages 1457-1466  
  Keywords Dairy Animals [LL110]; Animal Nutrition (General) [LL500]; Animal Nutrition (Physiology) [LL510]; Mathematics and Statistics [ZZ100]; acetates; acidosis; carbohydrate metabolism; carbohydrate modified diets; carbohydrates; cattle feeding; cows; dairy cattle; dairy cows; diets; feed conversion; forage; lactation; mathematical models; meta-analysis; milk fat; propionates; rumen; starch digestion; cattle; Bos; Bovidae; ruminants; Artiodactyla; ungulates; mammals; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; eukaryotes; butterfat; carbohydrate modifications; metabolic acidosis; saccharides; subacute ruminal acidosis; [Indexed using CAB Thesaurus terms]  
  Abstract The objective of the present study was to optimizing the dietary forage NDF (FNDF) and rumen degradable starch (RDS) content and ratios by using the meta-analysis in dairy cows. We collected 39 peered review manuscripts, which were related to FNDF or RDS content on rumen health and milk performance in dairy cows. In this study, we adopted FNDF to RDS ratio (CBIR) or their intake difference (CBID) as carbohydrate balance indexes (CBI), and evaluated their regression relationship to the ruminal pH, fermentation characteristics, milk fat and feed efficiency. The results revealed that the CBIR and CBID showed strong linear or quadratic correlation with the dependent variables. Dietary CBIR and CBID above 1. 28 or 1.09 kg.d-1 could minimize the risk of subacute ruminal acidosis, respectively. To obtain appropriate feed efficiency (>=1.5), milk fat (>=3.5%) and acetate to propionate ratio (2.2:1-3:1) in dairy cows, the CBID and CBIR should be set in the range of -0.42-0.99 kg.d-1 and 0.93-1.30, respectively. In this study, the appropriate CBID and CBIR ranges were calculated based on meta-analysis, the CBID and CBIR can reflect the change of rumen health and performance of dairy cow.  
  Address College of Animal Science and Technology, Northwest A&F University, Yangling 712100, China. xnlifei@126.com yaojunhu2004@sohu.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Chinese Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0366-6964 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Web of Science, ScienceDirect and Cambridge Online Journals searched. Database record copyright CAB International 2010 Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1323 Serial 2804  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Al-Samarai, F.R. url  openurl
  Title A meta-analysis of the impact of parity on dystocia and stillbirth in Holstein cattle Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Advances in Animal and Veterinary Sciences Abbreviated Journal (up) Adv Anim Vet Sci  
  Volume 2 Issue 7 Pages 381-9  
  Keywords Dairy Animals [LL110]; Animal Reproduction and Embryology [LL250]; Non-communicable Diseases and Injuries of Animals [LL860]; age at first calving; calving interval; cows; dairy cattle; dairy cows; dystocia; fetal death; parturition; complications; cattle; Bos; Bovidae; ruminants; Artiodactyla; ungulates; mammals; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; eukaryotes; foetal death; [Indexed using CAB Thesaurus terms]  
  Abstract Dystocia and stillbirth are major factors reducing the productivity of dairy cattle. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of parity on the rates of dystocia and stillbirth. A meta-analysis was conducted to investigate the impact of first parity (primiparous) and later parities (multiparous) on dystocia and stillbirth in Holstein cattle. A total of 30 and 19 papers were analyzed for evaluation of two traits. Results revealed that primiparous cattle are more susceptible to dystocia [Odds Ratio (OR)=2.68, 95% Confidence interval (CI) 2.51 to 2.85], stillbirth (OR=2.18, 95% CI 1.84 to 2.58) as compared with multiparous. These results supported the opinion about the importance of considering primiparous and multiparous as different traits in genetic evaluation and shed light on the importance of improving genetics and environment of heifers to minimize the effect of dystocia and stillbirth in Holstein cattle.  
  Address Department of Veterinary Public Health, University of Baghdad, Baghdad, Iraq. firas_rashad@yahoo.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2309-3331 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, Google Scholar, CAB (Abstracts?), ISI Web of Knowledge (Web of Science?), Science Direct, SciQuest and Scirus searched. Database record copyright CAB International 2010. Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1278 Serial 2765  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Akhtar, A.Z.; Pippin, J.J.; Sandusky, C.B. url  openurl
  Title Animal studies in spinal cord injury: a systematic review of methylprednisolone Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication Alternatives to Laboratory Animals : ATLA Abbreviated Journal (up) Altern Lab Anim  
  Volume 37 Issue 1 Pages 43-62  
  Keywords Animals; Cats; Disease Models, Animal; Dogs; Haplorhini; Humans; Methylprednisolone/ therapeutic use; Mice; Neuroprotective Agents/ therapeutic use; Predictive Value of Tests; Rabbits; Rats; Recovery of Function; Sheep; Species Specificity; Spinal Cord Injuries/ drug therapy/physiopathology  
  Abstract The objective of this study was to examine whether animal studies can reliably be used to determine the usefulness of methylprednisolone (MP) and other treatments for acute spinal cord injury (SCI) in humans. This was achieved by performing a systematic review of animal studies on the effects of MP administration on the functional outcome of acute SCI. Data were extracted from the published articles relating to: outcome; MP dosing regimen; species/strain; number of animals; methodological quality; type of injury induction; use of anaesthesia; functional scale used; and duration of follow-up. Subgroup analyses were performed, based on species or strain, injury method, MP dosing regimen, functional outcome measured, and methodological quality. Sixty-two studies were included, which involved a wide variety of animal species and strains. Overall, beneficial effects of MP administration were obtained in 34% of the studies, no effects in 58%, and mixed results in 8%. The results were inconsistent both among and within species, even when attempts were made to detect any patterns in the results through subgroup analyses. The results of this study demonstrate the barriers to the accurate prediction from animal studies of the effectiveness of MP in the treatment of acute SCI in humans. This underscores the need for the development and implementation of validated testing methods.  
  Address Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, Washington, DC, USA. aysha.akhtar@oxfordanimalethics.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2009/03/19  
  ISSN 0261-1929 (Print) 0261-1929 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 611 Serial 2333  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bettauer, R.H. url  openurl
  Title Systematic review of chimpanzee use in monoclonal antibody research and drug development: 1981-2010 Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Altex Abbreviated Journal (up) Altex  
  Volume 28 Issue 2 Pages 103-116  
  Keywords Animal Testing Alternatives; Animal Welfare; Animals; Antibodies, Monoclonal/pharmacology; Pan troglodytes; Research Design; Chimpanzees  
  Abstract This survey examines the extent to which live chimpanzees have been used in monoclonal antibody (mAb) research and the drug approval process. The survey covers 193 scientific articles published during the years 1981-2010, as well as preclinical studies leading to the approval of mAb drugs by the Food and Drug Administration of the United States. The frequency of the articles has decreased by more than two- thirds from their highs in the late 1980's, and the aggregate number of chimpanzees used in these studies has decreased by more than 90%. The experimental protocols ranged from single or multiple blood draws to extraction of body fluids and tissue samples, and to multiple, repeated organ biopsies. Many studies involved infecting the chimpanzee(s) with pathogenic organisms and immunization and infusion protocols. Addressing the health history and status of the chimpanzees was an exception rather than the rule, and anesthesia and analgesia were mentioned only in a small minority of the surveyed articles. In the past two decades, the FDA has approved 32 mAb drugs, but only three of those drugs could be determined to involve the chimpanzee in the preclinical stage. Two of those three drugs have been withdrawn from the market due to their severe adverse effects in human patients. Available alternatives, together with ethical and economic reasons, suggest that the use of the chimpanzee in this manner may not be necessary or appropriate.  
  Address Bettauer BioMed Research, McLean, VA, USA. raija.bettauer@verizon.net  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2011/06/01  
  ISSN 1868-596X (Print) 1868-596X (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 435 Serial 2361  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, W.; Liu, Z.; Yao, Z.; Fan, Y.; Ye, X.; Chen, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The prevalence and influencing factors of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus carriage in people in contact with livestock: A systematic review Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication American Journal of Infection Control Abbreviated Journal (up) Am J Infect Control  
  Volume Epublication ahead of print Issue Pages  
  Keywords Animals; Livestock; Veterinary surgeons  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is becoming a serious epidemic worldwide. Recently, studies have shown that people in contact with livestock may have a greater chance of MRSA carriage. We aimed to establish the prevalence of MRSA among people in contact with livestock and review the factors influencing MRSA carriage. METHODS: We systematically examined published epidemiologic studies on MRSA prevalence in people in contact with livestock using Pubmed, Medline, Embase, Ovid, and the Cochrane Library. Prevalence estimates were pooled using a random-effects model. Study heterogeneity was assessed using Q statistics and quantified with I2 statistics. RESULTS: Thirty-three eligible studies were included in this systematic review. Prevalence of MRSA ranged from 0.0%-85.8%. The pooled prevalence estimate of MRSA was 14.2% (95% confidence interval, 9.1%-20.1%) for people in contact with livestock. Substantial heterogeneity in eligible studies was noted (chi2 = 1,025; P < .001; I2 = 96.9%). Subgroup analysis showed the prevalence of MRSA was high in people from Europe (15.9%), farmers (18.2%), and by longitudinal study design (38.9%). Animal contact and intensity of animal contact were associated with increased risk of MRSA carriage. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that there may be transmission of MRSA between animals and humans.  
  Address Guangdong Key Laboratory of Molecular Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Guangdong Pharmaceutical University, Guangzhou, China. Guangdong Key Laboratory of Molecular Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Guangdong Pharmaceutical University, Guangzhou, China. Electronic address: chensidong1@126.com.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Eng Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2015/02/15  
  ISSN 1527-3296 (Electronic) 0196-6553 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, MEDLINE, Embase, Ovid (?) and the Cochrane Library searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 1314 Serial 2795  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Aghajafari, F.; Murphy, K.; Matthews, S.; Ohlsson, A.; Amankwah, K.; Hannah, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Repeated doses of antenatal corticosteroids in animals: a systematic review Type Journal Article
  Year 2002 Publication American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology Abbreviated Journal (up) Am J Obstet Gynecol  
  Volume 186 Issue 4 Pages 843-849  
  Keywords Adrenal Cortex Hormones/administration & dosage/adverse effects; Animals; Behavior, Animal/drug effects; Betamethasone/administration & dosage/adverse effects; Birth Weight; Embryonic and Fetal Development/drug effects; Female; Fetal Growth Retardation/chemically induced; Fetal Organ Maturity; Haplorhini; Lung/embryology; Medline; Male; Mice; Placebos; Pregnancy; Rabbits; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Sheep  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this review was to assess the effects of repeated doses of antenatal corticosteroids on lung and brain function and on growth restriction in animals. STUDY DESIGN: MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched for randomized controlled trials that compared repeated doses of antenatal corticosteroids versus a single dose, with or without placebo, in pregnant animals. RESULTS: Nineteen studies were included. The animals that were studied included sheep, monkeys, rabbits, and mice. There were 8 studies that assessed the effects of repeated doses of antenatal corticosteroids on lung function. All the studies reported improvement in lung function after repeated doses of antenatal corticosteroids. Seven studies investigated the effects of repeated doses of antenatal corticosteroids on brain or nervous system function or growth; all the studies found adverse effects with repeated doses of antenatal corticosteroids. Eleven studies looked at the effect of repeated doses of antenatal corticosteroids on fetal growth. Nine studies found evidence of fetal growth restriction with repeated doses of antenatal corticosteroids. One study assessed long-term behavioral outcomes in mice and found no effect. CONCLUSION: Evidence from randomized controlled trials in animals suggests that repeated doses of antenatal corticosteroids may have beneficial effects in terms of lung function but may have adverse effects on brain function and fetal growth. Because of the differences between animals and humans, it is difficult to extrapolate directly the results of these studies to humans. Therefore, randomized controlled trials in humans are needed to assess the effects of repeated courses of antenatal corticosteroids for pregnant women who are at increased risk of preterm birth in terms of important perinatal, neonatal, and maternal outcomes.  
  Address Institute of Medical Sciences, Maternal, Infant and Reproductive Health Research Unit, Center for Research in Women's Health, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Center, University of Toronto, Ontario.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2002/04/23  
  ISSN 0002-9378 (Print) 0002-9378 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes MEDLINE and Embase searched Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 503 Serial 2332  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Frizzo, L.S.; Zbrun, M.V.; Soto, L.P.; Signorini, M.L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of probiotics on growth performance in young calves: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Animal Feed Science and Technology Abbreviated Journal (up) Anim Feed Sci Tech  
  Volume 169 Issue 3/4 Pages 147-156  
  Keywords Pesticides and Drugs (General) [HH400]; Information and Documentation [CC300]; Animal Nutrition (General) [LL500]; Host Resistance and Immunity [HH600]; Animal Nutrition (Physiology) [LL510]; Nutrition related Disorders and Therapeutic Nutrition [VV130]; Prion, Viral, Bacterial and Fungal Pathogens of Animals [LL821]; Animal Immunology [LL650]; Microbiology (General) [ZZ390]; Milk and Dairy Produce [QQ010]; Other Produce [QQ070]; Forage and Feed Products (Non-human) [RR000]; animal nutrition; antibiotics; body weight; calves; data analysis; databases; diarrhoea; digestive system; feed conversion efficiency; feeds; gastrointestinal diseases; growth promoters; growth rate; immunity; infections; intestines; lactic acid; lactic acid bacteria; meta-analysis; milk; passive immunity; probiotics; promoters; research; weight gain; Bacteria; bacterium; prokaryotes; alimentary tract; data banks; diarrhea; feeding stuffs; gastrointestinal system; growth stimulants; lactate; promoter region; promoter sequences; scouring; studies; cattle; [Indexed using CAB Thesaurus terms]  
  Abstract Growth of calves during their first few weeks of life is one of the most important factors affecting their performance during subsequent rearing, and it can be modified by disease, especially gastrointestinal infections. Use of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) is a tool which may maintain the intestinal microbial balance, prevent diarrhea and improve growth. However, a consensus has not been reached as to whether probiotics are effective in improving growth of calves. The objective of this meta-analysis was to assess effects of probiotics on the growth of calves (i.e., body weight gain (BWG), feed efficiency). PubMed and Scopus databases were searched from 1980 to 2010, unrestricted by language. The inclusion criteria were: randomized and controlled experiments using calves less than 5 d of age without apparent disease and with passive immunity, and published in peer reviewed journals. Twenty-one and 14 studies were included to assess probiotic effects on BWG and feed efficiency, respectively. LAB supplementation increased BWG (standardized mean differences (SMD)=0.22822, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.1006-0.4638) and improve feed efficiency (SMD=-0.8141, 95% CI -1.2222 to -0.4059), considering the source of heterogeneity and publication biases. Growth of calves was not affected when the LAB was added to whole milk, but beneficial effects occurred when LAB was added to milk replacer. The probiotic effect was not related to the number of LAB strains in the inoculum. The number of calves in the experiments had an impact on the results and conclusions. Probiotics may be an alternative to the antibiotics commonly used as growth promoters in calves.  
  Address Department of Public Health, Faculty of Veterinary Science – Litoral National University, Kreder 2805, (S3080HOF) Esperanza, Province of Santa Fe, Argentina. marcelo.signorini@gmail.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0377-8401 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed and Scopus searched. Database record copyright CAB International 2010 Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 324 Serial 2427  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Klevenhusen, F.; Muro-Reyes, A.; Khiaosa-Ard, R.; Metzler-Zebeli, B.U.; Zebeli, Q. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A meta-analysis of effects of chemical composition of incubated diet and bioactive compounds on in vitro ruminal fermentation Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Animal Feed Science and Technology Abbreviated Journal (up) Anim Feed Sci Tech  
  Volume 176 Issue 1 Pages 61-69  
  Keywords Animal Nutrition (General) [LL500]; Animal Nutrition (Physiology) [LL510]; Techniques and Methodology [ZZ900]; Forage and Feed Products (Non-human) [RR000]; ammonia; animal nutrition; chemical composition; composition; correlation analysis; crude protein; data analysis; diet; diets; dry matter; essential oils; estimation; fatty acids; feeds; fermentation; fibre; in vitro; meta-analysis; oils; research; rumen; rumen fermentation; rumen fluid; techniques; volatile fatty acids; feeding stuffs; fiber; studies; cattle; ruminants; [Indexed using CAB Thesaurus terms]  
  Abstract This study examined the role of supplementation of several bioactive compounds (BC) and the chemical composition of the diet used as substrate for in vitro incubations, on in vitro ruminal fermentation profile and nutrient degradation. A meta-analytical approach was used to weigh the sample size used in each experiment, and account for the random effect of each as well as unequal variance among studies. A total of 20 recently conducted experiments with 354 treatments, each including one control (i.e., no BC supplementation), fulfilled the criteria for inclusion. Doses of BC supplementation varied from 0.03 to 500 mg/g dry matter (DM) of incubated diet. Contents of crude protein (CP) and neutral detergent fibre (NDF) of the incubated diets (DM basis) ranged from 139 to 189 g/kg and 160 to 420 g/kg, respectively. Results indicate that supplementation of BC linearly decreased (137.4 versus 116.5 mmol/L; P<0.05) concentration of total volatile fatty acids (VFA) and proportion of acetate (P<0.05). Also, the concentration of ammonia in the in vitro rumen fluid was lower with BC supplementation (22.9 versus 15.6 mg/dL; P<0.05). Analysis by backward elimination correlation analysis revealed that inclusion of the chemical composition of the incubated diet into the model with BC supplementation improved the accuracy of estimation of responses of fermentation variables. Thus, higher NDF and CP contents of the substrate and higher BC dosage were associated with lower concentrations of total VFA (r2=0.54), whereas both lower CP contents of the substrate and BC supplementation lowered the concentration of ammonia (r2=0.32). This analysis showed negative associations between BC supplementation and in vitro disappearance of DM and NDF, and positive correlations with dietary NDF content. In contrast, higher BC inclusion and lowering NDF content in the diet was accompanied with decreased in vitro CH4 formation (r2=0.21). Results indicate that BC supplementation and chemical composition of the incubated diet are determining factors which impact responses of in vitro ruminal fermentation and degradation.  
  Address Institute of Animal Nutrition, Department for Farm Animals and Veterinary Public Health, Vetmeduni Vienna, Veterinaerplatz 1, 1210 Vienna, Austria. qendrim.zebeli@vetmeduni.ac.at  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0377-8401 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, Google Scholar, Sciencedirect and Scopus searched. Database record copyright CAB International 2010 Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 575 Serial 2471  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Lean, I.J.; Celi, P.; Raadsma, H.; McNamara, J.; Rabiee, A.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of dietary crude protein on fertility: meta-analysis and meta-regression Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Animal Feed Science and Technology Abbreviated Journal (up) Anim Feed Sci Tech  
  Volume 171 Issue 1 Pages 31-42  
  Keywords Animal Genetics and Breeding [LL240]; Animal Physiology and Biochemistry (Excluding Nutrition) [LL600]; Animal Reproduction and Embryology [LL250]; Dairy Animals [LL110]; Animal Nutrition (General) [LL500]; Milk and Dairy Produce [QQ010]; Animal Husbandry and Production [LL180]; Animal Nutrition (Physiology) [LL510]; Crop Produce [QQ050]; Forage and Feed Products (Non-human) [RR000]; Field Crops [FF005]; animal breeding; animal nutrition; blood; blood chemistry; comparisons; composition; conception rate; cows; crude protein; dairy cattle; dairy cows; data analysis; diets; feeds; fertility; fibre; intake; meta-analysis; milk; milk production; models; modification; pregnancy; research; rumen; soyabean products; soyabeans; urea; yields; cattle; Glycine (Fabaceae); Bos; Bovidae; ruminants; Artiodactyla; ungulates; mammals; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; eukaryotes; Papilionoideae; Fabaceae; Fabales; dicotyledons; angiosperms; Spermatophyta; plants; feeding stuffs; fiber; gestation; soybean products; soybeans; studies; [Indexed using CAB Thesaurus terms]  
  Abstract Studies used to evaluate effects of dietary intervention on fertility may be subject to confounding because modification of one nutritional input requires a change in at least one other input. Meta-analytical modeling allows examination of a main intervention for a series of studies, but also an examination of a series of related effects through use of meta-regression. Effects of dietary crude protein (CP) on fertility were examined using this approach. We obtained 21 studies containing 32 comparisons that had pregnancy or conception data and met the eligibility criteria for meta-analysis of randomized controlled experiments providing information on diets used. Publications that contained data on prospective, randomized controlled experiments examining effects of dietary CP, either concentrations or degradability, or effects of a specific feed ingredient intervention on fertility were identified. Details on dietary formulation and diet intake were extracted from the publications, as were measures of urea in blood or plasma. Estimated fixed and random effects relative risks showed that risk of conception was lower in cows fed higher CP or more degradable CP diets (fixed effect (Mantel-Haenszel Relative Risk)=0.91 (95% CI 0.84-0.98); P=0.019). This effect was homogenous (I2=0) and not influenced by difference in blood urea N, duration of intervention, breed, parity, milk production or type of diet delivery. Significant associations among CP components of the diet and carbohydrate fractions supported the hypothesized potential for confounding, but only the amount of soluble CP eaten was a significant meta-regression covariate that reduced risk of conception. There was no evidence that the significant reduction in fiber or non-fiber carbohydrate (NFC) fractions of the diets associated with increased concentration of CP, soluble CP or rumen degradable fractions or soyabean products content of the diet influenced conception rates. Results support findings of experiments showing that increased intake of soluble CP reduced conception rates, and provides strong evidence that increased concentrations of CP or increased degradability of CP, within the ranges evaluated in the studies contributing to this meta-analysis, reduce the risk of conception in lactating dairy cattle.  
  Address Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Sydney, Camden, NSW, Australia. ianl@sbscibus.com.au  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0377-8401 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PubMed, Google Scholar, Science Direct, Scirus and CAB (Abstracts) searched. Database record copyright CAB International 2010 Approved yes  
  Call Number UoN @ douglas.grindlay @ 570 Serial 2479  
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