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Author (up) Legatti, S.A.M.; El Dib, R.; Legatti, E.; Botan, A.G.; Camargo, S.E.A.; Agarwal, A.; Barretti, P.; Paes, A.C. url  doi
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  Title Acute kidney injury in cats and dogs: A proportional meta-analysis of case series studies Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication PLoS One Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 13 Issue 1 Pages e0190772  
  Keywords Acute Kidney Injury; Cats; Dogs; AKI; mortality  
  Abstract INTRODUCTION: Risk of mortality in the setting of acute kidney injury (AKI) in cats and dogs remains unclear. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the incidence of mortality in cats and dogs with AKI based on etiology (i.e. infectious versus non-infectious; receiving dialysis versus conservative treatment). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ovid Medline, EMBASE, and LILACS were searched up to July 2016. Articles were deemed eligible if they were case series studies evaluating the incidence of all-cause mortality in cats and dogs with AKI, regardless of etiology or the nature of treatment. RESULTS: Eighteen case series involving 1,201animalsproved eligible. The pooled proportions for overall mortality were: cats53.1% [95% CI 0.475, 0.586; I2 = 11,9%, p = 0.3352]; dogs 45.0% [95% CI 0.33, 0.58; I2 = 91.5%, P < 0.0001]. A non-significant increase in overall mortality risk was found among dialysed animals relative to those managed with conservative treatment, independent of animal type and the etiology of their AKI. The pooled proportions for overall mortality according to etiology, regardless of treatment type, were: AKI due infectious etiology for cats and dogs, 19.2% [95% CI 0.134, 0.258; I2 = 37.7%, P = 0.0982]; AKI due non-infectious etiology for cats and dogs, 59.9% [95% CI 0.532, 0.663; I2 = 51.0%, P = 0.0211]. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest higher rates of overall mortality in cats and dogs with AKI due to non-infectious etiologies relative to infectious etiologies, and showed non-significant differences in terms of higher rates associated with dialysis compared to conservative management. Further investigations regarding optimal time to initiate dialysis and the development of clinical models to prognosticate the course of disease and guide optimal treatment initiation for less severe cases of AKI in cats and dogs is warranted.  
  Address Department of Veterinary Hygiene and Public Health, School of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, Unesp – Univ Estadual Paulista, Botucatu, Sao Paulo, Brazil. Department of Anaesthesiology, Botucatu Medical School, Unesp – Univ Estadual Paulista, Botucatu, Sao Paulo, Brazil. McMaster Institute of Urology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. School of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, Unesp – Univ Estadual Paulista, Botucatu, Sao Paulo, Brazil. Institute of Science and Technology, Department of Biosciences and Oral Diagnosis, Unesp – Univ Estadual Paulista, Sao Jose dos Campos, Sao Paulo, Brazil. Schoolof Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. Department of Internal Medicine, Botucatu Medical School, Unesp – Univ Estadual Paulista, Botucatu, Sao Paulo, Brazil.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2018/01/26  
  ISSN 1932-6203 (Electronic) 1932-6203 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Ovid Medline, EMBASE, and LILACS searched Approved no  
  Call Number UoN @ rachel.dean @ 1467 Serial 2922  
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